Improving radiology reports and leveraging IT to improve efficiency are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: benefits of actionable reports; how to leverage IT resources to improve efficiency and quality; four strategies to improve radiology reports; healthcare providers experience challenges in transitioning to value-based care; and Asia is poised to replace Europe as second largest healthcare market by 2025.

RSNA 2016: Actionable reports can save money, patient anxiety – Radiology Businessmoney in a wastebasket

According to the Institute of Medicine, between $800 billion and $1 trillion is wasted by the U.S. healthcare system every year. And imaging plays a role in this costly cycle. Unactionable language in a radiology report can create unneeded exams—and radiology reports often contain vague wording. Aggregating usable data, clinical history, and relevant documents into a report can aid the referring physician in reaching a conclusion and delivers the best value to patients. Using standardized language and pre-populated text is important.

RSNA 2016: How to improve quality by leveraging your IT department – Radiology Business

A medical director of enterprise imaging urged increased use of IT resources to improve efficiency and quality. He tapped the IT staff to extract all relevant information about a patient from the EMR and automatically give it to radiologists as they place orders. He also eliminated the need for technologists to enter imaging protocols into equipment before each exam. The IT staff also implemented a system that allows radiologists to send short message services or text messages to other physicians—and when those messages are ignored, an alarm goes off until they are acknowledged.  

Centers consolidate workstations with Carestream Vue RIS and Vue PACS Imaging technology applications have the potential to provide many benefits – including increased efficiency. With this goal in mind, Reno Diagnostic Centers of Reno Nevada implemented Carestream’s Vue RIS and Vue PACS to help streamline workflow

Customer Input Drives Carestream’s Engineering Innovation Carestream was proud to receive the Aunt Minnie award for Best New Radiology Device at RSNA16 in Chicago. The prestigious award was given to Carestream for our innovative OnSight 3D Extremity System that brings a new modality and clinical value to

Carestream Health integrates Materialise service that produces 3D anatomical models for medical applications

If a picture is worth a thousand words, how much is an actual physical anatomical model worth?

For some healthcare providers, the ability to see and touch a 3D visualization of pathology or a model of an organ prior to surgery could be priceless. That’s why Carestream is collaborating with Materialise NV to provide healthcare providers with a Web-based printing service to create 3D anatomical models.

AnatomyPrint ge3d anatomical modelnerates 3D anatomical models from STL files that originate with data in Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform. Materialise can use the files to generate detailed 3D printed models for healthcare providers.

“Our printing service enables healthcare providers to quickly and effortlessly send imaging data to our company, which is a premier supplier of 3D models used in medical applications,” said Brigitte de Vet, Vice President of Materialise Medical Unit. “This technology can help a clinician visualize the anatomy in 3D, which can assist in providing improved patient outcomes.”

Reports can help facilitate the prevention of serious or disabling diseases; an interview with Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí of the Royal Academy of MedicineRadiology structured report

Haga clic aquí para leer esta entrevista en español.

Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí has held chair number 13 of the Royal Academy of Medicine since last February. In his inaugural speech as a scholar at this prestigious institution, Dr. Martí-Bonmatí made references to quantitative radiology and imaging biomarkers.

In the second part of his interview with Everything Rad, he explains how biomarkers and structured reports will change the way radiologists work in the future.

5 reasons why the future of radiologists is secure

Dr. Eliot Siegel, University of Maryland School of Medicine

There has been quite a bit of “trash talk” about radiologists being replaced by computers in both thepopular press and in the medical journals lately.  Experts in artificial intelligence and machine learning such as Andrew Ng at Stanford have suggested that radiologists might be easier to replace than their executive assistants.

robots can't replace radiologists

A well-funded startup’s CEO recently suggested that he would love to replace the “wasted protoplasm” that represents the radiology profession with a machine learning system.

Ezekiel Emanuel, principal “architect” of the Affordable Care Act, has gone so far as to suggest that radiologists might be replaced by computers in the next four to five years.  He made his comments about artificial intelligence in healthcare in his keynote address at the ACR this spring. He repeated the comments in recent articles in the New England Journal of Medicine “Predicting the Future – Big Data, Machine Learning, and Clinical Medicine”, and in the Journal of the American College of Radiology “The End of Radiology?  Three Threats to the Future Practice of Radiology”.

As a result of all the unfounded hype, I’ve been getting letters from trainees and colleagues. They are concerned about the potential threat of ‘automated radiologists’ and ask whether they should drop out of radiology or avoid it as a career.