Diagnostic Reading #30: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Carestream LogoAnother week means another edition of Diagnostic Reading where we highlight five must-read articles published in the last seven days. This week’s articles focus on Stage 3 Meaningful Use, dense breast tissue, VNAs, breast cancer screening, and mobile app adoption among radiologists.

1) Proposed Rules for Stage 3 Meaningful Use – Imaging Technology News (ITN)

Dave Fornell of ITN goes into details for each of the eight objectives for Stage 3 Meaningful Use set in place by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The eight objectives include: 1. Protect Patient Electronic Health Information; 2. Electronic Prescribing; 3. Clinical Decision Support (CDS); 4. Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE); 5. Patient Electronic Access to Health Information; 6. Coordination of Care Through Patient Engagement; 7. Health Information Exchange (HIE); and, 8. Public Health Reporting.

2) Making Sense of Dense Breasts – Imaging Technology News (ITN)

Jeff Zagoudis of ITN discusses how as states continue to mandate patient notification of dense breast tissue, the technology for analyzing and reporting continues to evolve. A big issue today is how almost all in the medical community know about the impact of breast density, but that knowledge has not been passed down to patients. The article dives into the how many states in the U.S. are working to notify patients about dense breast tissue, and other modalities to get a second read of the exam.

3) NEJM: Breast Cancer Screening Reduces Mortality by 40% – AuntMinnie

“Researchers from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) found that women ages 50 to 69 who regularly receive mammography screening reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer by 40%, compared with women who are not screened. This translates into about eight deaths prevented per 1,000 women regularly screened, according to the group.”

4) SIIM 2015: VNA Adoption Yields Workflow, Cost Benefits – AuntMinnie

In this session from SIIM 2015, Wake Radiology was able to realize the benefits of a vendor-neutral archive (VNA) such as improved workflow, better management of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images, and reduced storage costs.

5) Q&A: Radiologists at the Forefront of Mobile App Use – Diagnostic Imaging

The Q&A is with David Hirschorn, MD, director of radiology informatics at Staten Island University Hospital, in which he discusses a panel he participated on at ACR 2015 called, “Reshaping Radiology Through Mobile: Apps, Technologies, and FDA Regulations.”

DBT: Is It Ready for PACS Prime Time?

SIIM 2015 LogoOn the final day of SIIM 2015, a vendor panel took place that looked at the evolution and adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and whether or not facilities were prepared to handle the influx of these 3D images on their PACS, as well as across their IT networks.

The panel was led by David A. Clunie, PixelMed, and consisted of Ron Muscosky, MSEE, Carestream, Steve Deaton, Viztek, Mark Bronkalla, MBA, Merge, and Bobby Roe, Visage.

After the vendors each took turn describing their own offerings and advice to those who currently use DBT or are planning to, we segued into an audience Q&A that dived into more detail among the seven audience questions. Below are the questions asked, as well as answers provided from the panel.

Question #1: Secondary capture–should facilities be talked out of it?

Answer: The option exists to store in a standalone archive, or in a PACS and then have the DBT images converted. The issue is that once converted into a PACS, facilities now have double the storage needs as two images now exist. Among panel attendees, they all either had DBT in place, and planned to have it within the next 12 months. However, few who were planning deplpy DBT had a plan in place. Essentially, facilities need to put priority on BTO (Breast Tomosynthesis Object) over SCO (Secondary Capture Object) for improved flexibility in storing and sharing images.

Question #2: What is the clinical impact of DBT? Does it take three times as long to read the exams?

Answer: This answer to this question was diverted to the audience, where one attendees traditional 2D mammography took 10-20 seconds to read, versus DBT exams which took 20 minutes. Attendees knew reading DBT exams took longer, but not that long. The panel responded to this answer by saying that DBT was still relatively new and as adoption and familiarity increased, reading time would become more efficient.

Question #3: Will reimbursement for DBT improve? Especially after the stick-shock for installation?

Answer: When DBT was not reimbursed, few were using the technology. Now that more are using the technology, reimbursement is in place, though it is consider poor. For improved reimbursement, the introduction of new competitors will drive purchase and installation prices. Carestream’s Muscosky said that he has been seeing many facilities adding DBT for competitive reasons, because they do not want to lose patients to other facilities that have it installed. There are of course diagnostic benefits to DBT, and in turn providing better patient care. Essentially, facilities should be installing DBT to maintain an edge on the competition, and use it as a marketing device for the facility. A large majority of the audience agreed with this and are currently practicing this themselves.

SIIM 2015 DBT PanelQuestion#4: Regarding size of images–how can DICOMweb help with performance issues?

Answer: One response was that is does not matter one way or the other if facility is handling everything on the server side. Another response was that any image being view for mammography is either lossless or not. High resolution, no bandwidth advantage to the client, because you want to have a viewer that does not need the entire study to start display or the entire object to start display. Server-side issues have advantages but is not a silver bullet. Facilities can user server-side for non-diagnostic, or offer a choice on whether facilities want loss or lossless, and server-side is not truly offering bandwidth advantages.

Question #5: This audience member asked about digital mammography priors for comparison reasons that has resulted in a struggling workflow. She had to alter workflow because her facility cannot get to prior to workstations fast enough. Has this problem been fixed with digital mammography?

Answer: The issue with the attendee’s facility was that there are multiple offices, but read at one central workstation. The facility is sending all studies to all workstation, creating three or four copies. Routers would send study once across, and central location would route once. The solution to this is that intelligent routing would mitigate the issue. Technology that is zero-footprint has not been available, whether supporting server-side rendering or not, but it is moving in that direction. All of this re-routing goes away once facilities move to the cloud. Panelists commented how it is important to focus on not just getting diagnostic tools to diagnosing physician, but also having good bedside manner with patients. Carestream’s Muscosky added that many facilities are converging multiple sites, and data needs to be accessed quickly no matter where from. Data cannot be sent around among facilities and re-routed.

Question #6: Is the industry moving toward supporting motion detection and correction?

Answer: Panelists all agreed that this advancement would need to be completed on the image acquisition side, since these vendors are the ones creating the hardware. They all agreed that it would great to see projection when there is motion, but have not heard of anyone released a motion detector.

Question #7: How do facilities correct hanging protocols that are not working?

Answer: One true way to identify an image according to view, and every view port has to give the user an option to toggle between C-view, and others. Facilities should refer to the IHE DBT framework. There was an idea presented that in the future, vendors should allow hanging protocols that make more sense and are deterministic. Users still want to hang right, regardless of vendor, and new modality gives a chance to hope for the best compliance. In the future, there will need to be a right code that allows users to apply logic and alternate paths to identify mishaps.

PulvinoRich Pulvino is the digital media specialist for Carestream. He attended SIIM 2015 from May 28-30 at the National Harbor in Maryland.


Diagnostic Reading #29: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

It’s Friday, which means it’s time for another Diagnostic Reading! This week’s articles focus on the expanding purposes of VNAs, a study from the Annals of Internal Medicine about breast cancer risk factors, an article about the ICD-10 grace period and updates about presentations from ACR 2015.Carestream Logo

1) Time to Retire the term “VNA”? – Healthcare Informatics

This article addresses the acronym, VNA, and its definition: Vendor Neutral Archive. The growth of health IT products has also expanded their responsibilities. The author claims that a VNA is neither ‘vendor neutral’ nor an ‘archive.’ He goes on to explain, saying that these applications manage data rather than simply archive it.

2) Study: There’s More to Breast Cancer Risk than Density – Aunt Minnie

A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine noted that breast density is not the only factor that should be considered when determining which women should receive supplemental breast screening in addition to mammography. The researchers looked at a variety of factors including age and a consortium of risk factors. The authors writes, “Density information combined with breast cancer risk could be used to prioritize women who could benefit from breast imaging tests with better specificity than digital mammography, such as tomosynthesis.”

3) Number of Female Radiologists, Field Leaders Remains Low – Diagnostic Imaging

According to a presentation this week at ACR 2015, the number of women in radiology has not grown in the last 10 years. This research was done to see if the raised awareness of gender disparity has caused any change in gender representation in radiology. They found that women have consistently made up about 27% of the radiology field since 2004.

4) Newly Introduced Bill Looks to Establish ICD-10 Grace Period – Health Imaging

The US House is moving forward with the ICD-10 bill. The upgrade will take place on October 1. However, some healthcare executives and politicians were concerned that transition to the new coding from ICD-9 would cause confusion. For this reason, a bill was passed that says nobody can be denied Medicare reimbursement solely for using inaccurate codes during the first 18 months of implementation.

5) Medicare Imaging Spending is Down, with Some Variation by State – Radiology Business

At ACR 2015, presenters shared their findings on the trends of Medicare spending when it comes to imaging. They found that overall, national Medicare expenditures for imaging have fallen since 2006. They attribute this to factors based on education about radiation dose and the recession as well as policies instituted by the government. Some states did not follow these trends, read more to find out why.



Diagnostic Reading #26: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Carestream LogoIt’s Friday, it’s almost the weekend, and that means it’s also time for a new Diagnostic Reading. This week’s articles include an article about technology and connectivity written by a Carestream’s director of IT, more questions about the USPSTF breast screening recommendations, tips to improve healthcare quality, the new CMS quality-based standards and how patient portals might cause disparities.

1) Is Technology Still the Main Road to the CustomerCIO Review

The growth of new media has been obvious in recent history. David G. Sherburne, Director of IT for Carestream, provides his insight on the growth of media when it comes to “C-Level executives.” Sherburne makes the initial observation that technology has created connectivity and ease of access across several levels. He notes that for this reason, he states that executives should abandon the old-fashioned silo system and work more closely with their “C-Level” peers.

2) Should women over 75 be screened for breast cancer?AuntMinnie

Many questions have been raised about the recent update by the USPSTF concerning recommendations for breast imaging. One of the disputed topics is about the recommendation for women over 75 years-old. This article explores the importance of continuing breast screening when women are older, highlighting how other organizations such as the American Cancer Society and the American College of Radiology have recommended that women should have annual screenings starting at age 40, and as long as they are in good health.

3) 15 ‘Vital Signs’ to Improve HealthcareFierce Healthcare

Quality healthcare is a point of emphasis at just about any facility. This article lists 15 metrics, as determined by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) that can affect the overall health of Americans and lead to better health care provision. These factors include patient safety, care access, community health, addictive behavior, preventative services, etc.

4) CMS Releases Strategic Vision for Physician Quality Reporting Programs – Healthcare Informatics

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have released standards for quality care reporting programs. This initiative moves the payment system away from the fee-for-service model and begins the shift toward reward incentives for providing quality care. Quality reporting and patient feedback are emphasized by the new plan.

5) Study: Patient Portals Could Widen Health Disparities – Healthcare Informatics

A recent study at Northwestern Medical has found that patient portals might widen disparities by race, education and health literacy. The study concluded that people who are not health literate are 3.5 times less likely to register for patient portals than their counterparts.




The USPSTF Misses Again on Breast Screening Guidelines

In a recent move that is drawing much ire from the medical and women’s health communities, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) declined to expand its recommendation on which women should receive regular mammography screening. What was offered upon this rejection was essentially the reinforcement of the conservative guidance from 2009.

The new guidance states that women in their 50s should only receive mammography screening every two years, rather than annually as is advocated by many women’s health and medical groups. Advocates for annual screening are also upset that the USPSTF did not recommend screening for women in their 40s, because of its belief that the benefits of screening in this age group do not outweigh the purported harms of screening.

To be blunt—this is questionable advice at best. The guidelines will do nothing but confuse women as again they are not emphatic, but leave decisions up to the women’s general physicians or OB-GYN.

Many women in the 40 to 49 group have dense breasts. Having regular screening mammograms can help this group be sent for further screening with adjuncts such as full breast ultrasound and MRI—helping to find earlier cancers.

Many countries, such as Sweden, Norway, Australia and Canada have adopted the approach that if you have dense breasts (or a certain amount of glandular tissue,) the woman should be screened yearly. Women with fatty breasts are screened every 2 years. This is without arbitrary age grouping.

The U.S. is getting better about dense breast notification, as 22 states have enacted laws about notifying women who possess dense tissue, and a number of other states have bills introduced about these notifications, but these new guidelines from USPTF could hinder this progress.

Breast cancer is heterogenous, i.e. ,many different types with some being much more aggressive than others. Finding cancers later may do more harm as treatments will be ineffective, more toxic and of course more expensive

Another one of the biggest pain-points in the new guidelines was that women over 70 were excluded. This is just not right. Many women in this age group are active, healthy and go on to live very long lives. Finding breast cancer in this age group can be easier due to the fact many women in this age group have fatty breast tissue, making cancer show up much easier. Small cancers can be treated and women can go on to live very productive lives.

On a personal note, two of my aunts had small cancers found when they were over 75. One lived to be 93, being cancer-free for almost 20 years, and the other lived to be 103!

As a woman, I am lucky I have had the opportunity to have advisors and the education to know what to do. There are many out there who are not so lucky. Much has been done to educate women on the importance of screening, and what the USPSTF is doing by confusing them will not help.

For an addition helpful viewpoint on this issue, please read Dr. Daniel Kopans opinion that was published on AuntMinnie.

Anne Richards, CarestreamAnne Richards, Clinical Development Manager, Women’s Healthcare, Carestream



Diagnostic Reading #25: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Carestream LogoIt’s Friday, which means it is time for a new edition of Diagnostic Reading. This week’s articles include a study on radiology and patient care, the benefit of clinical decision support, breast cancer screening recommendations, the importance of telemedicine and an update about the future of Medicare without SGR.

1) ARRS: Patient Consults Improve Care, Raise Radiology Profile – AuntMinnie

A study presented at the annual American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in Toronto revealed that patients value the ability to meet with a radiologist to discuss diagnostic images. The study found that patients that met with a radiologist were likely to want to review exam results with a radiologist again. Furthermore, connecting with patients adds to the value of care provided by radiologists.

2) Clinical Decision Support can Cut Inappropriate Imaging – AuntMinnie

According to a report in Tuesday’s edition of Annals of Internal Medicine, clinical decision-support (CDS) can have a beneficial effect on imaging appropriateness. Hard-stop features could cut inappropriate imaging even more. These features disallow imaging procedures without the approval of another person, if the software considers the study to be inappropriate.

3) Speak Now About USPSTF Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations – Diagnostic Imaging

The United States Preventive Services Task Force has released recommendations for mammography. These recommendations discuss the issues of breast density and aging as some of the risk factors for breast cancer. USPSTF is asking for public comments on these recommendations until May 18, 2015.

4) Telemedicine a High 2015 Priority for Healthcare Executives – FierceHealthIT

A survey of 233 healthcare professionals conducted by REACH Health has indicated that telemedicine has taken a position of precedence among healthcare executives. About 60 percent of respondents considered telemedicine to be a high priority this year. These professionals see telemedicine as an important way to improve care. The author notes that patients are interested in telemedicine and aware of its benefits.

5) The SGR is history. Now what? – Health Imaging

With legislation to repeal SGR last week, it is time to look towards the future of healthcare. This article explains what the SGR repeal means and how it will affect healthcare legislation. The author discusses the importance of the new value-based healthcare model that will be put into place called the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System.



Diagnostic Reading #20: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Carestream logoIt’s Friday, which means it’s time for a new edition of Diagnostic Reading! This week’s reading includes the benefits of big data, the effectiveness of early imaging, pediatric radiology, an update on healthcare legislation, and an article about the importance of mammography technicians to women’s health. Have a great weekend!

1) The Benefits of Data-Driven Healthcare– Hospital Impact
This article addresses the issue of data analysis. The author makes a point to say that though data is important, simply collecting the data is useless. Evidence-based reports are noted as the most effective way to improve healthcare. If data can be used to determine which departments are underperforming, then the issue can be repaired.

2) JAMA: Early Imaging Questionable for Older Adults with Back Pain– Aunt Minnie
Researchers from the University of Washington found that early imaging for back pain in adults older than 65 years old has no significant clinical value. This study, which was recorded in the Journal of the American Medical Association, emphasized that though there are no benefits for patients, early imaging procedures add to healthcare costs. Also read: Adults at Low Risk of Heart Disease Shouldn’t Get Screening

3) Building Trust in Pediatric Imaging– Diagnostic Imaging
When working with pediatricians, it is important for radiologists to gain rapport. This trust comes from more than just accurate readings. Radiologists also need to exhibit interest in the patient and commitment to reducing radiation dose. This article looks more deeply into the relationships between radiologists and pediatricians and gives insight on how to build trust.

4) Washington Debrief: Interoperability Bill Would Penalize Non-Compliant Vendors– Healthcare Informatics
This article discusses new pieces of healthcare legislation that have been introduced. First, EHR providers and vendors will be required to be interoperable by 2018. Second, this article talks about data security. Legislators are making progress towards securing patient records and notifying patients in the event of a data breach. Lastly, lawmakers have been working to fix the current Medicare system in order to improve the physician reimbursement.

5) NCoBC: Mammography Techs Play Crucial Role in Women’s Health– Aunt Minnie
Mammography is one of the most rapidly growing segments of health imaging. This article discusses the importance of the technologist. Patient-technologist interactions have become more intensive and the technologist has taken on greater responsibility when it comes to education. The author lays out guidelines for mammography technologists to thrive in the new scene.

Diagnostic Reading #7: 10 Most Popular Blog Posts from the Second Half of 2014

CARESTREAM Touch Ultrasound System - 1Carestream has worked hard to provide content of value throughout 2014. We have used our blog to deliver information about Carestream technology, address major industry trends, and inform readers about the medical imaging and IT fields. In this edition of Diagnostic Reading, we look at our most read blog posts since July. The topics include, the recent unveiling of our newest technology, industry infographics, image quality, digital 3D mammography, and dose reduction.


Carestream unveiled its newest technology in Chicago at RSNA 2014. The CARESTREAM Touch Ultrasound System officially moved the company into the ultrasound market. This post contains information about the new technology, including images that explain its features and capabilities.


This infographic follows radiology reporting throughout history. It covers traditional hand written reports, transcribed reports, and voice recognition. Pros and cons of these types of report are listed. Ultimately, the evolution brings us to multimedia reporting and highlights its benefits.


Since being FDA approved earlier this year, radiologists are 58% more confident in their ability to read chest x-rays with bone suppression software. Since the software produces 2-D images rather than 3-D images, it also reduces the typical dose for patients receiving chest x-rays.


This Q & A with Marty Pesce asks questions about his experiences as an applications engineer for Carestream. The interview discusses the nature of a job as a radiologic technologist. Pesce also had the opportunity to answer questions about his personal experiences in the radiology field.


El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, California, has taken measures to dramatically track and decrease patient dose. The hospital attributes this success to their transition from CR to DR technology. It claims that better imaging software leads to less repeated imaging.


This post emphasizes the importance of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography for women with dense breast tissue. Numerous studies are noted by the author, including a JAMA study that found that by using DBT, there was a 41% increase in the detection of possibly lethal cancers.


With hospital mergers becoming prevalent, this post suggests that interoperability will continue to be a challenge. The adoption of software such as CARESTREAM Vue Connect could ease the transition. Combining data allows for both institutions to access their own information, as well as having access to new patient information.


Seventy-eight percent of office based physicians use some sort of electronic health record system (EHR). This post addresses the possibility of  radiologists and physicians working together using RIS and PACS to document patient records. There are inevitable challenges, but ideally this could mean “one patient, one record.”


In a time when Americans find it difficult to afford medical bills, radiologists must be conscientious about cost. Inappropriate imaging exams and lack of quality drive up costs, this post discusses how imaging appropriateness and effective reading of images can reduce costs in the field of radiology. Additionally, the post addresses other ways that health IT can help lower imaging costs.


Innovative Radiology adopted CARESTREAM Vue Motion. Since the implementation, efficiency has been higher. Additionally, Vue Motion connected Innovative Radiology with more than 40 sites in early 2014.

Diagnostic Reading #3: Five Must-Read Articles from the Past Week


On-site or cloud-based teleradiology can provide effective patient care.

An on-site or cloud-based teleradiology system can connect radiologists to reports, images, and patient history to provide efficient and effective care.

This week’s Diagnostic Readings include updates on meaningful use, analysis of telemedicine growth, tips about dose management and more. Check out our weekly series, “Diagnostic Reading,” for news and updates in healthcare IT and radiology.

1) Survey Indicates Telemedicine Adoption Growth among Healthcare Executives

This post presents the results of a survey taken by 57 healthcare executives. The findings explore the extent to which health care systems are adopting telemedicine and electronic health records (EHR). The author explores the the channels of telemedicine that are the most popular among this sample group.

2) Enterprise Imaging—Walking the tightrope: Optimizing radiation dose management 

Since the 1980s, the annual per-capita radiation dose from medical exposure has risen from 0.53 mSv to 3.1 mSv. This article from the November edition of Applied Radiology explores the challenges and solutions of moderating dose. The author discusses how the balance of radiation dose management can be optimized.

3) AMA Urges CMS to Drop Meaningful Use Penalties

This article addresses the existing meaningful use criteria and the difficulties that some medical centers may encounter. This piece discusses that reasons outside of a physician’s control may be the reason for their lack of interoperability. Due to these difficulties, the American Medical Association has asked the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to “suspend all penalties to physicians and healthcare facilities for failure to meet meaningful use criteria.”

4)  It’s Time for Radiology to Take Peer Review Seriously

This post discusses the importance of knowing your diagnostic accuracy rate in radiography. The author writes about comparing accuracy rates to bench marks and national standards. These ideas could lead to more accurate readings and more industry-wide credibility.

5) To Improve Mammography Reading Accuracy, Follow Through with Workups

This article discusses the correlation between reading high volumes of mammography readings and accuracy rates. The study conducted at the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle found that radiologists with higher numbers of annual workups had higher screening sensitivity and cancer-detection.

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Necessary for Imaging Dense Breast Tissue

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

The image on the left is a DBT image, and the image on the right is traditional 2D mammography.

Digital breast tomoysnthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, has often been referred to as being the key to advancement in breast imaging. With more and more states passing laws requiring that women be notified if they are classified as having dense breast tissue, DBT is proving to be beneficial in accurate detection—a JAMA study showed that using 3-D mammography resulted in a 15% reduction in recall rates and a 41% increase in the detection of potentially lethal cancers.

Dense breast tissue and the accompanying notifications to women who possess it has become a frequent conversation topic over the past couple years. As of now, 20 states have enacted laws that require medical professionals to notify women if their mammograms reveal them to have dense tissue. Organizations such as Are You Dense Advocacy are fighting the good fight trying to get more states on board with these notifications because of the major risk dense breast tissue presents— making it more difficult to detect cancer in a mammogram than normal tissue.

At the International Congress of Radiology (ICR) in September 2014, Dr. Marwa Adel from Misr University for Science and Technology and Cairo Scan in Egypt presented two cases:

  1. The first case, Dr. Adel and company compared breast cancer visibility in digital mammography with that of DBT. Cancer visibility was ranked higher for DBT than for digital mammography in 52% of cases and was equivalent in 49 cases (33.6%). When observing the group with higher breast tissue density, the cancers were rated more visible in 64.6% of the cases.
  2. In the second study, DBT also proved better than digital mammography in image quality of masses. DBT was rated as equivalent or superior to digital mammography in 96% of the total findings.

Dr. Adel and the other authors of the studies concluded that DBT is superior to digital mammography in diagnostic performance. Particularly when it comes to dense breast tissue, it is clear that the use of DBT is vital to providing improved diagnosis to patients.

There are important questions regarding financial, technical, product, and workflow issues related to DBT that should be answered before a facility installs a system. As women’s healthcare continues to evolve, more and more facilities are able to implement DBT machines and be in a position to provide the highest quality of care to their patients.

At RSNA 2014, Carestream will showcase enhancements to its DBT module including a DBT image map that indicates the location and orientation of the currently displayed slice in the breast, a slabbing tool that allows  adjust of the slab thickness , improved workflow settings and the display of DICOM-compliant 2D synthetic views, which are calculated from the 3D dataset.  For more information, you can visit us in South Hall at booth #4735.

UPDATE, NOVEMBER 10, 2014: According to an article published last week by Health Imaging, “the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) established two new add-on codes that will go into effect Jan. 1, 2015, and extend additional payment when DBT is performed along with 2D digital mammography.”  You can click the link to get more details about the designated codes and payment amounts for DBT. CMS said it will also “revisit payment for DBT and 2D mammography for 2016 as part of a review under its misvalued codes initiative.”

Ron Muscosky, Worldwide Product Line Manager, HCIS, Carestream Ron Muscosky, Worldwide Product Line Manager, Healthcare Information Solutions, Carestream