Diagnostic Reading #12: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Dose reduction and new ultrasound application make headlines

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: new technique uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs; monitoring software that can reduce dose for pediatric patients; a “digital pathologist” can improve cancer detection; variation in imaging utilization impacts practicing radiologists; and a decade of improvements in CT innovation are not reaching patients in some European countries.

Fluid in the lungs being measured by a new technique using ultrasound – Health Imaging

Medical researchers and engineers from North Carolina State University have found a new approach that uses ultrasound to measure fluid levels in the lungs. The noninvasive approach can track progress in treating pulmonary edema, which is common in patients with congestive heart failure.lung filled with fluid Continue reading

Accreditation for Cone Beam Orthopaedic Imaging: Answers to 7 Questions

Providers must be accredited by a CMS-approved organizationCarestream OnSight 3D Extremity System

The process for securing accreditation for Cone Beam CT orthopaedic imaging can be a bit confusing. However, it’s a necessary process. Any facility performing CT scans must obtain accreditation prior to receiving reimbursements from Medicare and many private payers.

The process for securing accreditation is worth it. Adding the capability for in-house cone beam CT exams can have major benefits for orthopaedic practices. It can help speed your workflow, boost your productivity, and support a higher standard of care. It can even help differentiate your practice from the competition.

Read on to learn the simple answers to 7 common accreditation questions. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #10: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: the chatbot will answer you now; and IR can improve clinical outcomes

This week’s articles include: study shows more follow-up ultrasound exams performed when non-radiologists provide initial interpretation; interventional radiology can help improve clinical outcomes and recovery times; ACA replacement bill contains provisions beneficial to radiologists; AI chatbot can answer interventional radiology questions; and trial takes a different approach to classifying cancer treatment.

More follow-up ultrasounds performed when non-radiologists interpret – Diagnostic Imaging

Follow-up imaging after an initial ED ultrasound is significantly reduced when the ultrasound examination is interpreted by a radiologist rather than a non-radiologist, according to a study published in the JACR. Results showed that of 200,357 ED ultrasound events, 163,569 (81.6%) were interpreted by radiologists and 36,788 (18.4%) by non-radiologists. Across all study years, ED patients undergoing ultrasound examinations interpreted by non-radiologists underwent additional diagnostic imaging studies compared with patients whose examinations had been interpreted by a radiologist.

Interventional radiology can improve clinical outcomes and recovery times – American College of Radiology

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) have created downloadable resources to help local interventional radiologists educate hospital executives and radiology group officers about the clinical and economic benefits of starting a full-fledged, in-house IR practice. Clinical IR can help improve clinical outcomes, recovery times and patient satisfaction – key factors in new delivery and payment model reimbursement. Continue reading

Hemodynamic Evaluation and Measurement: Overcoming Limitations for Flow

Study: University Clinic in Regensburg evaluates Carestream Touch Prime Ultrasound System for hemodynamic evaluation and measurement

For hemodynamic evaluation and measurement, conventional Doppler ultrasound can only provide a partial picture. A persistent limitation has been the angle of insonation for Doppler examinations.

Calculating the velocity of a flow relies on knowing the precise angle of the ultrasound beam relative to the direction of flow. In conventional ultrasound systems, the practical insonation angle is limited to around 60°. For greater angles, even small errors in the angle can cause unacceptably large distortions in the results.Image from Touch Prime Ultrasound system

Overcoming this restriction for evaluating flow in vessels requires repositioning the transducer which can be uncomfortable for the sonographer. Additionally, the limitation is not as easy to work around when assessing regions of turbulent blood flow. An example is trying to understand the effects of stenoses in vessels or valves, or when evaluating fistulae.

Overcoming angular restrictions

Smart Flow imaging technology in the CARESTREAM Touch Prime Ultrasound Systems overcomes the angular restrictions. It generates a part of the ultrasound vibration that is effectively at a right angle to the beam. The system then interprets the resulting 2D interference patterns in the received ultrasound signal to present a more complete picture of the flow, representing it with shaded color-coding and arrows. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #9: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Topics presented at ECR2017 and HIMSS2017 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: how radiology departments can help ensure patient safety; why more radiologists are suffering from burnout and dissatisfaction; patients expect their physicians to be able to easily share their medical data with other providers; a progress report on data mobility and analytics; and why big data must be used in the fight against cancer.

How can radiology departments help ensure patient safety? – AuntMinnieEuropePatient safety

A presentation at ECR 2017 described potential risks from radiology procedures that include a missed abnormality due to technical issues as well as perception and communication errors.  Other errors include the wrong procedure being performed, studies performed on the wrong patient, or on the wrong side of the patient. Radiation exposure has risks including the potential for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. The presenter urged everyone working in radiology areas to act responsibility to ensure optimal patient treatment and outcomes. Continue reading

How Can You Measure Innovation in Diagnostic Imaging?

Patents and industry recognition are two ways to quantify it

Innovation in diagnostic imaging and healthIT is continually evolving, improving their potential to help provide better patient care and at less cost.

But how can you measure innovation? Patents and industry recognition are two ways. Please indulge us while we share some of our accomplishments from 2016. And if you’d like a preview of our plans to advance imaging capture this year, read the recent blog by our president of Digital Medical Solutions, Jianqing Bennett.

Let’s start with patents. In 2016, we were awarded 43 new patents from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for innovation in radiographycone beam CT imaginghealthcare IT, and other areas. We also received 52 additional patents in European and Asian countries.

The patents earned by Carestream’s smart scientists and engineers include:

  • New medical image capture technologies related to the development of cone beam computed tomography (CT) systems designed for orthopaedic extremity imaging
  • Enhancements to our portfolio of healthcare IT systems that manage, store, and share patient data and medical imaging exams
  • Continued technology advances in our growing portfolio of radiology systems that can enhance diagnostic image quality for a wide range of healthcare providers
  • Continued advancements in laser imagers that provide affordable output of digital X-ray exams onto medical film and paper Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

News update: health IT boosts economy; radiologists get high ratings from patients

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data; radiology’s role as a value center; HIMSS survey shows health IT is boosting the U.S. economy; a report from the first HIMSS Cybersecurity Forum describes different types of attacks being launched on healthcare facilities; and patients gave high ratings to U.S. radiologists in study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data – Radiology Today

Recent advances in imaging technology deliver benefits for radiologists as well as healthcare providers and their patients. Enhanced interoperability has enabled off-site nighthawk radiology coverage.images of 24 7 clock

Also, large radiology practices can now serve rural as well as metropolitan areas—delivering access to subspecialists in all markets. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: March Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

March means spring is right around the corner in the Northern Hemisphere. It also means there is another “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!” We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the February image challenge!  The correct answer was — a mug with an alligator toy clipped to the rim!

Happy guessing and good luck!

March 2017 Image Challenge

Section 179: Radiology Equipment Tax Deduction for 2016

Section 179 offers radiology equipment tax savings for some small businesses

New radiology equipment and medical printing solutions have the potential to improve an imaging center’s bottom line through increased patient throughput. But did you know that there is also a possible radiology equipment tax deduction through Section 179 for small businesses?Magnifying glass higlighting the word tax

Under tax legislation passed by the federal government to help small businesses purchase capital equipment and spur economic growth, you might be able to write off (i.e. deduct) the entire amount of a purchase at one time (subject to certain limitations), rather than its depreciated value over time.

Under current tax law, this year’s Section 179 deduction allows business owners to write off up to $500,000 on overall property. However this amount is limited if total purchases exceed $2,000,000 during the year.

Additional details can be found at https://www.irs.gov/publications/p946/ch02.html and http://www.section179.org.

To understand the potential radiology equipment tax deductions that might apply under Section 179, refer to the following table: Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Top news: multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; and public clouds not secure

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: NIH study shows multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; cloud survey finds patient data might not be protected; what providers can learn from the hospitality industry; radiology as a business is becoming increasingly complex; and patient engagement reduces readmission from chronic conditions.

Multimedia radiology reports enhance tumor tracking – Auntminnie

Multimedia radiology reports that provide hyperlinks to annotated tumor measurements and include graphs that show treatment response can improve how these lesions are tracked over time, according to recently published research. In a retrospective study involving nearly 500 lesions, a team from NIH found that multimedia reports significantly improved concordance between Tumor Cellsradiologists and oncologists in selecting and measuring target lesions, compared with text-only radiology reports. The result is fewer discrepancies between what radiologists are measuring and what oncologists are using to evaluate how tumors are responding to therapy.

Cloud survey: quarter of healthcare organizations put patient data at risk in public cloud – Health Management Technology

A recent cloud survey analyzes healthcare organizations’ use of public cloud, the utilization of public cloud implementations, and how data is protected in these cloud environments. The survey of 51 healthcare and biotech organizations found that 25% of healthcare organizations using the public cloud do not encrypt their data. The survey also found that 63% of healthcare organizations say they intend to use multiple cloud vendors, and 38% of organizations with data in a multi-cloud environment are not using any form of encryption. Continue reading