Study: University Clinic in Regensburg evaluates Carestream Touch Prime Ultrasound System for hemodynamic evaluation and measurement. For hemodynamic evaluation and measurement, conventional Doppler ultrasound can only provide a partial picture. A persistent limitation has been the angle of insonation for Doppler examinations. Calculating the velocity of a

Carestream Health integrates Materialise service that produces 3D anatomical models for medical applications

If a picture is worth a thousand words, how much is an actual physical anatomical model worth?

For some healthcare providers, the ability to see and touch a 3D visualization of pathology or a model of an organ prior to surgery could be priceless. That’s why Carestream is collaborating with Materialise NV to provide healthcare providers with a Web-based printing service to create 3D anatomical models.

AnatomyPrint ge3d anatomical modelnerates 3D anatomical models from STL files that originate with data in Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform. Materialise can use the files to generate detailed 3D printed models for healthcare providers.

“Our printing service enables healthcare providers to quickly and effortlessly send imaging data to our company, which is a premier supplier of 3D models used in medical applications,” said Brigitte de Vet, Vice President of Materialise Medical Unit. “This technology can help a clinician visualize the anatomy in 3D, which can assist in providing improved patient outcomes.”

Access to radiology reports can help eliminate barriers and enable collaboration

Close-up of surgeons hands holding surgical scissors

The number of new innovations in health IT can be overwhelming. Hospital CIOs and administrators must help evaluate new software for referral management, applications for improved transparency, and analytics software. How can HIT directors and hospital administrators decide which technologies are worth investing in? Answer: start with the ones – like cloud hosted PACS solutions – that solve a real problem – like radiology staffing shortages.

Nicola Strickland, head of the Royal College of Radiologists, made a convincing case to The Observer in 2016 for “how the crisis in radiology recruitment will break the entire NHS system in Britain”. And in January 2017, AuntMinnie Europe painted a dire picture of how a hard Brexit would further strain the lack of radiology resources.

Other parts of Europe, especially rural areas, face a similar problem. The shortage of radiologists and other health professionals is driving medical providers with no formal or previous affiliations to find ways to pool their resources and collaborate among their sites.

Fortunately, cloud based services and teleradiology are toppling the geographic barriers. An increasing number of medical health providers in Europe are installing PACS – Picture Archiving and Communication Systems – and hosting them in the cloud. For example, Spire Healthcare, one of the largest private healthcare groups in the UK, enabled cross site reporting using the Carestream cloud. Using different cloud services from Carestream, Spire Healthcare can store and archive data to enable cross site reporting and then distribution of the reports and associated images.

Throughout the U.S. and worldwide, equipment decision criteria are not so different

There are clear advantages to having new, up-to-date medical devices; including gains in productivity and efficiency. Medical equipment can support the movement to reduce healthcare costs and increase its efficiency and effectiveness. This movement is worldwide, and nothing new, as a graphic on medical device prioritiesMcKinsey report[1] stated a few years ago. “Today, medical device companies operate in a different world. In developed countries, healthcare systems are under acute financial pressure…. Developing economies are transforming the environment, too…. Success in emerging markets requires a deep understanding of stakeholders’ needs.”

New stakeholders influence purchase decisions

And new stakeholders are changing the way organizations look at the purchase of medical equipment. “In the developed world, decisions that used to be the sole preserve of doctors are now also made by regulators, hospital administrators, and other non-clinicians…. The result of this phenomenon is a shift from individual outcomes to a focus on population-level effectiveness.” Also, big data is beginning to offer a new level of evidence-based data that helps us evaluate the true advantages of technology.

Advisory Board Company’s Imaging Performance Partnership research offers insights for imaging leaders

Recent years have seen transformational change occur in the American health care market. Keegrowth-strategies-for-imagingping up with each development is daunting, but equally challenging is identifying the implications of these changes on the future of health care delivery and payment. Below are three major takeaways for imaging leaders, courtesy of the Advisory
Board Company’s Imaging Performance Partnership research team. This outlook can serve as a guide for forging a successful radiology strategy in 2016 and beyond.

  1. Explore screening and interventional radiology programs as growth opportunities

Recent years have seen low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening and CT colonography (CTC) receive approval from the United States Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF) as essential health benefits. These decisions open the door for radiology providers to provide these potentially life-saving services to patients in an affordable way, while also demonstrating radiology’s value proposition as a gateway to the health system. Many providers also are exploring mobile mammography and partnerships with employers as a way of growing their programs. In order to ensure the success of these new initiatives, it is vital to deploy marketing strategies to referring physicians about the benefits and potential harms of these services.

Similarly, interventional radiology (IR) has had new life breathed into the specialty as pioneers advance the list of procedures outside of vascular services. Additionally, IR is attractive to both patients and health systems due to its noninvasive nature, its low cost compared to surgical approaches and the great outcomes results. Institutions with existing IR programs should align their growth with non-procedural specialties like oncology, pediatrics and primary care. Several programs have also seen success marketing IR directly to patients who are seeking an alternative to invasive surgeries.