Video: Meaningful Use and Clinical Decision Support Dominated HIMSS15

Dave Fornell, editor for Imaging Technology News (ITN) and Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC) Magazine, stopped by the Carestream booth at HIMSS15 to discuss the biggest trends he saw at the conference.

Meaningful Use (MU) was the biggest trend Fornell saw, and he noted the different stages being focused on by vendors and hospitals. VNA, PACS, and EMR vendors he spoke with are focused on complying with Stage 3, but they are seeing that the hospitals are focused on consolidation.

Fornell also touched on clinical decision support, and how its part of Stage 2, but a much more important part of Stage 3 MU. As imaging exams are ordered, patient history is going to be ask for, and used as an integral component of the process.

The complete interview from HIMSS15 can be veiwed below.

Video: Discussion on Healthcare Data Storage & Interoperability Guidelines

Marianne Matthews, chief editor, Axis, and Cristine Kao, global marketing director, Healthcare Information Solutions, Carestream, discuss the challenges in today’s healthcare IT environment, particularly the high volumes of data and what facilities must do to manage it.

Matthews and Kao had this discussion at HIMSS15, and expanded on the role that healthcare providers play in the management of data, as well as how they are working with vendors to address data storage needs.

The ONC Interoperability Guidelines were also discussed. Particularly, the advantages of these guidelines becoming more widespread, the benefits of having DICOM medical images continue to be a standard, and the role radiology can play in the digitization of healthcare moving forward.

Clinical Collaboration Platform Grown from the Enterprise VNA

We have discussed the evolution of the vendor-neutral archive at length on Everything Rad, and that conversation will not dissipate any time soon.

Healthcare facilities are dealing with petabytes upon exabytes of data, and not only do they need technological resources to store this data, but they also need a system that can properly categorize the data, and provide access to it across different -ologies.

The animation below shows how VNA owners can build upon their systems to create the Clinical Collaboration Platform. The platform is able to capture data from various sources without changing departmental workflow.

A patient-centric repository is created that stores all of the medical imaging data whatever the format or modality, and distributes the images via the appropriate clinical viewer.

University College Hospital & Diagnostic Imaging Needs of Nigeria

We spoke with Dr. Biodun Adeyinka, consultant radiologist at University College Hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria at RSNA 2014 about what brought him and his colleagues to the meeting. He explained that while Nigeria is a wealthy country, he and his colleagues need to make a strong case for purchasing equipment. They came to RSNA to learn about the latest and greatest pieces of equipment and plan to bring this information back home to help with purchasing decisions.

NHS Ayrshire and Arran Works to Improve Radiation Dose with Radimetrics

NHS Ayrshire and Arran serves 400,000 people at 10 hospitals across East, North, and South Ayrshire in Scotland. Two years ago, the organization worked to integrate Bayer HealthCare’s Radimetrics with its Carestream Vue PACS. The integration was completed in weeks, and the facility immediately found how well the two work together.

With Radimetrics, NHS Ayrshire and Arran became able to track radiation dose and room utilization as a way to collect data and act swiftly if issues are to arise. The big questions that the facility can now answer include, “Are we minimizing radiation dose for our patients?” and “Are we making the best use of our resources?”

As the video above explains, the organization was able to bring protocols together, standardize them, and oversee the management of dose. With this newfound efficiency, NHS Ayrshire and Arran can now easily spot discrepancies in the data, and seamlessly update patient information.

As volume of exams and complexity exams goes up, the organization needs to justify its decisions. As an example, it can view dashboards to determine room utilization, which allows for specific acquisition on how a room is being used, with Radimetrics, that information is now at their fingertips.

[Video] Replacing Analog to Allow for DRX-1 Detector Sharing

Karen Swanson, R.T. (R) (M), Director of Medical Imaging, at Platte Valley Medical Center in Brighton, CO, shares her feedback about wireless detector sharing at her facility and the CARESTREAM DRX-Revolution.

The medical center replaced three analog portables with two DRX-Revolution Mobile X-Ray Systems. They share the DRX-1 detector between the portables and the RF room – making the best use of the most expensive piece of the system at peak times.

A Mobile Imaging Efficiency Showdown: CR vs. DR

When it comes to medical imaging it is no secret that every second counts. The modern healthcare environment can be incredibly fast-paced and medical imaging professionals demand, and deserve, the best when it comes to time-saving technologies.

We wanted to compare the efficiency of DR compared to CR using the DRX-1, and with the support of Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK we were able to record a speed test. In the video, wireless DR is almost twice as fast as standard CR mobile imaging–an impressive performance that could make a big difference in terms of productivity and patient care.

[Webinar] Image Quality: Does it Matter, and How Should We Define It?

Dr. Ralph Schaetzing, Manager, Strategic Standards & Regulatory Affairs, Carestream

Dr. Ralph Schaetzing, Manager, Strategic Standards & Regulatory Affairs, Carestream

Where is image quality? In the capture device? In the image processing? In the display system? In the brain of the viewer? Is it everywhere, or nowhere in particular?

These questions were answered recently in a webinar titled “Does Image Quality Matter?” by taking a closer look at the imaging chain.

Any imaging chain (also a medical one) contains five distinct functions:

  1. Capture (the creation of the image),
  2. Process (which itself consists of three sub-functions: preprocessing of the captured image, optimization for interpretation/viewing, and processing for the output device),
  3. Display (assuming a human is the viewer),
  4. Storage
  5. Distribution.

The answers depends on which image quality we mean: the objective image quality we can measure, the subjective image quality perceived by the viewer, or, particularly important in medical imaging, viewer performance using the image for some interpretation task.

In modern imaging systems, these three “flavors” of image quality are weakly, if at all correlated, which makes the prediction of one kind of image quality from another rather tricky, but also interesting.

The entire webinar has been embedded below. By the end, the questions asked at the outset should be answered, though the path to get to those answers may surprise you.