Diagnostic Reading #21: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Impact of emerging technologies on radiology makes headlinesX-ray technologist holding Carestream's DRX Detector

This week’s articles include: new audit shows causes of unnecessary CT and MR exams; analytics solutions expected to improve quality of care; photoacoustic imaging could guide breast cancer removal; population health management is the top driver of data analytics; and the debut of the first fully autonomous radiology interpretation system.

New audit pinpoints causes of ‘wasteful’ unnecessary scans – AuntminnieEurope

Radiologists’ failure to check the validity of requests for CT and MRI scans, along with ignorance among referring doctors of appropriateness criteria for imaging examinations, are the most important reasons for costly inappropriate requests of radiological exams, a new study from Saudi Arabia found. An audit of 674 CT and MRI scans revealed that 25% were inappropriate. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #20: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

PACS, cyber attacks, and mergers are in the news this week

Articles this week in Diagnostic Reading include: why radiology needs to define image storage guidelines; PACS alerts can boost communication with referrers; health services in the UK are recovering from last Friday’s cyber attack; hospital merger mania continues throughout the country; and registries can have real-time benefits for rads.

Why radiology – and radiologists – need defined image storage guidelines – Radiology BusinessRadiologist reading image

The sheer economy of storing images online should make it standard, but a maze of regulation and expensive penalties make it difficult for imaging providers to navigate the issue, according to a JACR article. Failure to maintain imaging up to state and federal standards can result in penalties up to $10,000 and place radiologists at risk of malpractice suits. If a lost or misplaced image results in patient injury, the radiologist personally bears responsibility. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #18: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Headlines include interoperability challenges in healthIT, and preventing rad burnout

This week’s articles include: radiology’s journey into transparency; Radiologist reading imagecombining 3D printing and special effects helps
surgeons become proficient by practicing with lifelike ETV training models; healthcare IT can only realize its full potential when the industry overcomes interoperability challenges; how radiologists can prevent burnout; and aging radiologists should consider a “phased in” plan to retirement that benefits themselves and their practices.

Look ahead: radiology’s journey into transparency – RSNA News

Health policy expert Richard Duszak, Jr., MD, offers a glimpse into the next chapter of healthcare where patients will expect transparency in delivery of healthcare systems. Digital forums will be available for patients to post information about their physicians and radiologists. Transparency means that some physicians will look good and some won’t. The opportunity exists to embrace and help lead this movement by developing metrics and platforms that provide meaningful information so patients know who radiologists are and what they do. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #17: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

MRI and CT modalities are in the news this weekRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: cloud-based cardiac MRI analytics can provide diagnosis in 15 seconds; sharing best practices can reduce CT dose; new Society of Interventional Oncology is created; radiology should work with certified health records; and CMS permits high-risk patients to receive annual low-dose CT scans for lung cancer screening without cost sharing.

Thinking intelligently about heart matters – Radiology Business

Cardiac MRI can answer many clinical questions about the heart and great vessels better than other imaging modalities, including echocardiography, nuclear SPECT, and cardiac CT. However, cardiac MRI is labor intensive. A new cloud-based solution approved by the FDA provides automated, editable ventricle segmentations based on cardiac MRI images. This platform’s analytics can do in 15 seconds a task that takes a radiologist at least 30 minutes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #16: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Patient portals and outpatient imaging centers are in the newsRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: radiologists can play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis; education of  older patients is key to adoption of patient portals; including informal caregivers in discharge planning can cut readmissions by 25%; outpatient imaging centers are on the rise; and 83% of executives plan to invest in telehealth.

Cardiac findings in stroke: What radiologists need to know – AuntMinnie Europe

Advances in CT and MRI make it feasible to identify subtle cardiac pathologies responsible for strokes that used to remain unnoticed. This puts greater emphasis on the know-how of imaging professionals, according to Spanish researchers who received a prestigious magna cum laude award at ECR 2017. “Radiologists play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis and management,” noted Dr. Flavio Zuccarino and colleagues from the thoracic radiology section in the department of radiology at Hospital del Mar in Barcelona, Spain. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #14: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; and rads might need to update their CVs

This week’s articles include: HHS is on track to transfer 41% of its data to the cloud; imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; Italians report 30% drop in breast cancer due to screening; MRI might help determine treatment for patients with depression; and radiologists might want to update their CVs.

HHS goes from reluctant to eager cloud adopter – Health Management Technology

In 2015 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reported just 1% of all systems in the cloud. If all goes as planned, the agency will have almost 41% of all investments moving “in some way” to the cloud. One of the key turning points came when IT staff and mission owners tested tools and software. Moving the HHS financial management system to a shared service provider’s cloud also helped.

image of a cloud

cloud computing

Imaging providers need to do a better job of reaching disabled adults – Radiology Business

Adults with disabilities undergo colon cancer screening at a lower rate when compared to the general population. Studies have found adults with disabilities utilize less preventative care in general, but colorectal cancer screening is especially troublesome. It’s an easily treatable disease with an intensive exam—which can create additional barriers to care. The recent uptick in colon cancer in young Americans underscores the need for widespread screening. Continue reading

Healthcare Cloud Solutions: Evaluating 4 Key Components of Data Security

A technical brief for assessing cloud solution providers

The use of healthcare cloud solutions is on the rise. Research firm MarketsandMarkets predicts that healthcare spending on cloud services will reach $9.48 billion by 2020, a big leap from $3.73 billion in 2015.

Several drivers are fueling the surge including addressing medical staffing shortages. Other drivers are cost efficiency, patient facing tools, access to information, telemedicine, and necessary computing power for big data analysis, according to CloudTech. Also, new modalities for diagnostic imaging bring with them increased storage requirements, making the cloud an essential part of an enterprise imaging strategy, according to Winthrop-University Hospital in NY.image of lock on a cloud Continue reading

See Carestream’s Innovative Imaging & Health IT Solutions from RSNA16

Watch this RSNA16 booth tour to see our broad portfolio of products!

RSNA16 was a dynamic event, brimming with new advancements in radiology. It’s tough to absorb all the innovation and information while you’re at the show. Here’s your chance to get a first – or second! – look at all the products we displayed at RSNA16.

Some of the highlights from our growing portfolio of diagnostic imaging products included:

  • OnSight 3D Extremity System that earned both the 2016 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation and AuntMinnie’s “Best New Radiology Device”for 2016. This compact cone beam CT system offers high-quality, lower-dose 3D imaging technology for capturing weight-bearing and other types of patient extremity images.
  • CARESTREAM DRX Plus detectors that are faster and lighter than previous models, and DRX Core detectors designed to make reliable, high-quality digital X-ray imaging affordable for healthcare providers of all sizes.
  • CARESTREAM DRX-Excel and DRX-Excel Plus radiography/fluoroscopy systems that perform contrast exams using fluoroscopy that can be associated with a patient’s radiography image, and
  • Carestream’s Touch Prime family of ultrasound systems that allow sonographers and clinicians to gain better visualization of small structures as well as contrast differences in tissue for radiology, OB/GYN, musculoskeletal and vascular applications.

Our healthcare IT portfolio was also in the spotlight. It includes a Unified Core architecture for our Clinical Collaboration Platform that enhances security as well as interoperability, and complements healthcare providers’ existing IT systems. This architecture delivers clinical image data acquisition, viewing, sharing and archiving, and allows healthcare facilities to add features as needed. Physicians can access our Vue Motion universal viewer to easily view and share patient medical images and reports using mobile devices.

Watch all our videos from RSNA16 on our YouTube channel!

Want to learn more about any of our products? Click here and one of our knowledgeable representatives will contact you. #healthIT

Radiology: 2016 Year in Review

Everything Rad: Top 7 Blogs in Diagnostic Imaging

As 2016 winds down, we take time for a Radiology Year in Review on Everything Rad.  There was considerable innovation and disruption in radiology and health IT imaging in 2016. The themes and conversations at diagnostic imaging sites and in media publications were reflected in our blogs. For our 2016 Radiology Year in Review, we are sharing the 7 blogs from Everything Rad that generated the most shares and likes.

What would you like us to write about in 2017? Would you like to be a guest author?  Post your suggestions and comments on this blog or email us at socialmedia@carestream.com.  We’d love to hear from you.

image of 2016 coming to a cloae

Baystate Health’s Regional HIE Invites Outside Providers to Participate to Help Enhance Patient Care

Baystate Health is an integrated delivery network (IDN) that includes five hospitals and more than 90 primary and specialty care practices serving a region of western Massachusetts with 800,000 residents. Patients that come to their facilities are also visiting other facilities outside of their network. Neil R. Kudler, MD, Chief Medical Information Officer at Baystate Health, shares the steps that Baystate Health is taking to reduce the chance that patients might be at risk of receiving duplicate procedures and imaging exams.

Reducing Sonographer Injuries Takes a Team Approach

Ultrasound is growing in popularity and its increased demand is impacting sonographers’ workload. An increase in the number of exams is placing added strain on sonographers who are already at risk of injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome from repetitive motions. The risk of injury can be minimized if sonographers, hospital and radiology department managers, and manufacturers work together. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #47: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

This week’s Diagnostic Reading include: researchers develop a way to tune the brain to a frequency that blocks pain signals; 3D printers can create detailed models that help surgeons prepare for complex Chronic Pain operations; an implant helps paralyzed monkeys walk; a genetic test can determine risk of having children with cystic fibrosis or spinal muscular atrophy; and radiology practices must grow to maintain viability.

Research shows way to “tune out” chronic pain – Clinical Innovation+Technology

Researchers from the U.K. have uncovered a method to control chronic pain by changing the frequency of brain waves. Chronic pain effects up to 30 percent of people, with 62 percent of people over the age of 75 experiencing pain. The team studied nerve cells and their frequency of communication to the body to develop a way to “tune” the brain to a frequency that blocks pain signals.

Unlocking the potential of 3D printing in radiology – Health Imaging

A 3D printing lab in the radiology department can bring a wide range of benefits, including improved surgical preparation, trainee education and inter-departmental collaboration, according to Mayo Clinic physicians. 3D models are used to prepare doctors for complex surgical and image-guided interventions. For example, surgeons practice deploying aortic grafts on detailed hearts, complete with simulated blood pumping through artificial veins, and use the models to determine the best way to approach a tumor resection.

Implant helps paralyzed monkeys walk – Clinical Innovation+Technology

A team of neurosurgeons has successfully implanted a device in paralyzed monkeys that allows them to walk, which may lead to improved care for humans with paralysis. A surgeon was able to place electrodes in the brain responsible for controlling leg movement and the spinal cord. The device can be turned on and syncs with brain signals to allow the patient to walk. Implanted electrodes communicate with a wireless transmitter on the outside of the skull and record muscle activity.

Amazon brings genetic testing to your front door – Clinical Innovation+Technology

Genetic testing can determine a parent’s risk of having children effected by cystic fibrosis (CF) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). One company developed a genetic test that is available from Amazon. The test takes the saliva of both parents and tests for both CF and SMA. This can be crucial knowledge, since one in 19 Americans are a carrier of CF or SMA, which means the child of two carrier parents has a 25 percent chance of having these diseases.

Private radiology practices must expand or get left behind – DotMed Healthcare Business News

The latest Radiology Business 100 survey of private radiology practices came out last month and the message is clear: radiology practices need to grow to maintain viability. While the study did not reveal specific revenue data, in general the revenue picture for large practices is better than smaller practices.  Average practice size crept up from 52 full time equivalent radiologists in 2015 to 53.5 in 2016.

Check back next Friday for a new issue of Diagnostic Reading. #healthIT