Diagnostic Reading #29: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

New this week: the human role in AI and cybersecurity; sonographers’ role in the UKMan kneeling while looking at x-ray

This week’s articles include: artificial intelligence and the future of medicine; cybersecurity training strategies for employees; information technology tools assist daily radiology workflows; the increasing role of sonographers in the UK; and radiology residents lack training in patient communication.

Our health data—the most important medical discovery of our time – HIE Answers

Although the future of medicine includes artificial intelligence (AI), none of it will be possible unless we properly manage our medical data. Our own medical studies, pathology results, CAT scans, and lab values enable this medical revolution. This transformation in how we think about healthcare data poses many technical and ethical challenges. To enable breakthroughs, we must appropriately store, curate, and share immutable data.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #27: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Better communications between radiologists and referring physicians can lead to better care

Man kneeling while looking at x-ray

This week’s articles include: smoothing communication barriers between radiologists and referring physicians can lead to better care; the 2018 QPP proposed rule eases burden on small and rural practices; many medical specialists are thinking about population health management; the dos and don’ts of hiring healthcare cybersecurity pros; and a new study reveals longer follow-up times for Asian-American women after abnormal mammograms.

Greasing radiologist/referring physician communication leads to better reads – Health Imaging

Smoothing barriers that impede radiologist/referring physician communication can lead to better care through improved timeliness and more nuanced interpretations, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Difficulties in reaching referring physicians are among the most common workflow disruptions cited by radiologists, according to a 2015 study. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #24: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Radiation dose and breast density legislation are in the newsRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: increasing research shows that subspecialty second opinions can be critical to patient care; some researchers are questioning the theory that radiation from diagnostic imaging can increase cancer risk; the legal consequences of EHR vendors selling data; and survey finds many radiologists uncertain about breast density legislation.

Subspecialty second opinions often critical to patient care – RSNA News

A growing body of research indicates that subspecialty second opinions can be critical to patient care. Because of this, experts say that academic radiology departments might want to consider offering formal second opinions as part of their services. Some radiology departments—including The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science at Johns Hopkins University Medical Institution in Baltimore—have already done this.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #23: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

News from SIIM17; and multi-media reports a missed opportunity

This week’s articles include: AI expected to expand today’s decision-making capabilities for imaging modalities; it’s important to educate patient’s about the role radiologists play in diagnosis; radiology reports need to include multi-media enhanced reporting; radiologists who use chest radiographs to diagnose COPD create false positive results; and a cardiovascular MR scan is a cost-effective way to scan large volumes of patients with a wide range of suspected heart conditions.

SIIM: AI poised to enhance all aspects of radiology – AuntminniePatient holding DRX digital radiography X-ray detector over one knee

Artificial intelligence (AI) will persistently and pervasively enhance all aspects of radiology, enabling precision medicine and potentially even finding disease before it becomes symptomatic, according to Dr. Keith Dreyer who spoke at the SIIM annual meeting. He adds that AI will expand today’s decision-making capabilities for both current and new imaging modalities, leading to greater detection and treatment of disease. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #22: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Health data limits, medical exam cost comparisons, and ACR

This week’s articles include: lack of access to health data could limit potential of machine learning; radiologists can simplify reports to improve readability; an app equips patients to review prices for more than 300 imaging procedures; ACR forms interdisciplinary organization to guide implementation of AI tools in radiology; and more women join ACR leadership but rates still lag.

patient holding DRX digital radiography X-ray detector over one knee

Could ‘Google Brain’ create technology to aid radiologists? – Radiology Business

Targeted training for radiologists to simplify report readability helps patients better understand radiology reports, according to a study. Radiologists took a one-hour workshop that emphasized writing with simple structure and brevity, using simpler words, phrases and sentence structures. A survey completed by the participants after the workshop showed that all participants believed they could change their writing styles, with 71 percent indicating their communication could be optimized for more effective communication. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #21: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Impact of emerging technologies on radiology makes headlinesX-ray technologist holding Carestream's DRX Detector

This week’s articles include: new audit shows causes of unnecessary CT and MR exams; analytics solutions expected to improve quality of care; photoacoustic imaging could guide breast cancer removal; population health management is the top driver of data analytics; and the debut of the first fully autonomous radiology interpretation system.

New audit pinpoints causes of ‘wasteful’ unnecessary scans – AuntminnieEurope

Radiologists’ failure to check the validity of requests for CT and MRI scans, along with ignorance among referring doctors of appropriateness criteria for imaging examinations, are the most important reasons for costly inappropriate requests of radiological exams, a new study from Saudi Arabia found. An audit of 674 CT and MRI scans revealed that 25% were inappropriate. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #20: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

PACS, cyber attacks, and mergers are in the news this week

Articles this week in Diagnostic Reading include: why radiology needs to define image storage guidelines; PACS alerts can boost communication with referrers; health services in the UK are recovering from last Friday’s cyber attack; hospital merger mania continues throughout the country; and registries can have real-time benefits for rads.

Why radiology – and radiologists – need defined image storage guidelines – Radiology BusinessRadiologist reading image

The sheer economy of storing images online should make it standard, but a maze of regulation and expensive penalties make it difficult for imaging providers to navigate the issue, according to a JACR article. Failure to maintain imaging up to state and federal standards can result in penalties up to $10,000 and place radiologists at risk of malpractice suits. If a lost or misplaced image results in patient injury, the radiologist personally bears responsibility. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #18: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Headlines include interoperability challenges in healthIT, and preventing rad burnout

This week’s articles include: radiology’s journey into transparency; Radiologist reading imagecombining 3D printing and special effects helps
surgeons become proficient by practicing with lifelike ETV training models; healthcare IT can only realize its full potential when the industry overcomes interoperability challenges; how radiologists can prevent burnout; and aging radiologists should consider a “phased in” plan to retirement that benefits themselves and their practices.

Look ahead: radiology’s journey into transparency – RSNA News

Health policy expert Richard Duszak, Jr., MD, offers a glimpse into the next chapter of healthcare where patients will expect transparency in delivery of healthcare systems. Digital forums will be available for patients to post information about their physicians and radiologists. Transparency means that some physicians will look good and some won’t. The opportunity exists to embrace and help lead this movement by developing metrics and platforms that provide meaningful information so patients know who radiologists are and what they do. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #17: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

MRI and CT modalities are in the news this weekRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: cloud-based cardiac MRI analytics can provide diagnosis in 15 seconds; sharing best practices can reduce CT dose; new Society of Interventional Oncology is created; radiology should work with certified health records; and CMS permits high-risk patients to receive annual low-dose CT scans for lung cancer screening without cost sharing.

Thinking intelligently about heart matters – Radiology Business

Cardiac MRI can answer many clinical questions about the heart and great vessels better than other imaging modalities, including echocardiography, nuclear SPECT, and cardiac CT. However, cardiac MRI is labor intensive. A new cloud-based solution approved by the FDA provides automated, editable ventricle segmentations based on cardiac MRI images. This platform’s analytics can do in 15 seconds a task that takes a radiologist at least 30 minutes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #16: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Patient portals and outpatient imaging centers are in the newsRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: radiologists can play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis; education of  older patients is key to adoption of patient portals; including informal caregivers in discharge planning can cut readmissions by 25%; outpatient imaging centers are on the rise; and 83% of executives plan to invest in telehealth.

Cardiac findings in stroke: What radiologists need to know – AuntMinnie Europe

Advances in CT and MRI make it feasible to identify subtle cardiac pathologies responsible for strokes that used to remain unnoticed. This puts greater emphasis on the know-how of imaging professionals, according to Spanish researchers who received a prestigious magna cum laude award at ECR 2017. “Radiologists play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis and management,” noted Dr. Flavio Zuccarino and colleagues from the thoracic radiology section in the department of radiology at Hospital del Mar in Barcelona, Spain. Continue reading