Diagnostic Reading #38: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Radiologist ethics training, equipment finance, and NHS Digital Academy are in the news

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles include: the recently launched NHS Digital Academy might be a key step in establishing informatics as a profession; radiologists and medical ethics training; a Canadian task force recommends AAA ultrasound screenings for men; equipment financing might help providers invest in new technology; and radiology residents improve skills after studying art.

NHS Digital Academy officially launched  – Digital Health

The recently launched National Health Service (NHS) Digital Academy is designed to create a change in the way the NHS develops digital leaders. It is also described as marking a key step in establishing informatics as a profession. NHS is the public health service of England, Scotland and Wales. Starting in 2018, the NHS Digital Academy aims to train 300 digital leaders over three years. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #33: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Making headlines: patient portals and radiologists have a role in patient centered care

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Diagnostic Reading summarizes the week’s top news in health IT and radiology.

This week’s articles include: the importance of patient engagement and successful use of online tools; predicting no shows in radiology; radiologists and their part in effective physician-patient communication; what it takes to succeed in cybersecurity; and radiologists’ important role in a new Alzheimer’s treatment study.

What functionalities should patient portal tools have to succeed?  – HIT Consultant.net

Although most hospitals experience dismal usage of patient portals—due to lack of both EHR interoperability and patient-desired features—the growth of other engagement solutions such as remote patient monitoring has transformed healthcare for many people. Patient engagement, once considered a lower priority in healthcare IT, is increasing in importance. Consequently, our population’s comfort with online tools will likely increase patient portal usage more once robust features/functionalities, easy usability, and effective promotion become the norm. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #32: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news this week: articles for radiologists new to the profession as well as seasoned HIT professionals

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

This week’s articles include: radiation is not the only risk for pediatric patients; AI learns to predict schizophrenia from MRI brain scan; role of healthcare data governance in big data analytics; tips on how to select the right EHR replacement vendor and system; and Radiology Nation provides tools for radiologists in training.

Radiation not the only risk to consider when imaging pediatric patients – Radiology Business

When managing the care of pediatric patients, both referring physicians and radiologists know it’s important to consider the risks associated with radiation exposure. But according to a recent article in JACR, focusing too much on those risks and not considering other key factors can end up potentially harming the patient.

AI ‘learns’ to predict schizophrenia from brain MRI – Radiology Business

A collaborative effort between IBM and the University of Alberta in Canada has produced artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms that are able to examine MRI exams and predict schizophrenia with 74 percent accuracy. The retrospective analysis also showed the technology was able to determine the severity of symptoms by examining activity in various regions of the brain. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #31: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Medical record storage, over-recommended mammograms, and point-of-care ultrasound are in the news

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

This week’s articles include: Kaiser EDs implement head CT trauma rules that reduce utilization; how long should healthcare providers save medical images; U.S. physicians over-recommend mammography; more point-of-care ultrasound is needed in ambulances and in ED; and the ACR launches a project that brings the brightest imaging informatics minds together with industry stakeholders and patient advocates to discuss who can use and own patient data, what methods of communication are best, and how AI can be used.

Community EDs cut needless trauma CT using Canadian rule – Health Imaging

After implementing an established rule for selecting head CT for trauma patients, 13 Kaiser Permanente community EDs in Southern California reduced avoidable head CT utilization by 5.3 percent while improving their performance on injury identification, according to a study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #30: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

AI’s influence on patient outcomes and phone interruptions to radiologists are in the news

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

This week’s articles include: dangers of phone interruptions for reading radiologists; use of AI can help physicians predict and improve patient outcomes; new heart imaging method might predict heart attacks; PET can accurately detect or exclude Alzheimer’s; and HIMSS Europe joins with Health 2.0 to coordinate 2018 digital health conference in Europe.

Phone interruptions can increase discrepancies – AuntminnieEurope

Both radiologists and referrers are far too quick to accept telephone interruptions. Telephone calls are one of the most frequent interruptions to reporting, and a call during the hour before completing a report may increase the chance of discrepancies by 12 percent. A study found that interruptions occur alarmingly often. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #29: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

New this week: the human role in AI and cybersecurity; sonographers’ role in the UKPicture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

This week’s articles include: artificial intelligence and the future of medicine; cybersecurity training strategies for employees; information technology tools assist daily radiology workflows; the increasing role of sonographers in the UK; and radiology residents lack training in patient communication.

Our health data—the most important medical discovery of our time – HIE Answers

Although the future of medicine includes artificial intelligence (AI), none of it will be possible unless we properly manage our medical data. Our own medical studies, pathology results, CAT scans, and lab values enable this medical revolution. This transformation in how we think about healthcare data poses many technical and ethical challenges. To enable breakthroughs, we must appropriately store, curate, and share immutable data.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #27: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Better communications between radiologists and referring physicians can lead to better care

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

This week’s articles include: smoothing communication barriers between radiologists and referring physicians can lead to better care; the 2018 QPP proposed rule eases burden on small and rural practices; many medical specialists are thinking about population health management; the dos and don’ts of hiring healthcare cybersecurity pros; and a new study reveals longer follow-up times for Asian-American women after abnormal mammograms.

Greasing radiologist/referring physician communication leads to better reads – Health Imaging

Smoothing barriers that impede radiologist/referring physician communication can lead to better care through improved timeliness and more nuanced interpretations, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Difficulties in reaching referring physicians are among the most common workflow disruptions cited by radiologists, according to a 2015 study. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #24: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Radiation dose and breast density legislation are in the newsPicture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

This week’s articles include: increasing research shows that subspecialty second opinions can be critical to patient care; some researchers are questioning the theory that radiation from diagnostic imaging can increase cancer risk; the legal consequences of EHR vendors selling data; and survey finds many radiologists uncertain about breast density legislation.

Subspecialty second opinions often critical to patient care – RSNA News

A growing body of research indicates that subspecialty second opinions can be critical to patient care. Because of this, experts say that academic radiology departments might want to consider offering formal second opinions as part of their services. Some radiology departments—including The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science at Johns Hopkins University Medical Institution in Baltimore—have already done this.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #23: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

News from SIIM17; and multi-media reports a missed opportunity

This week’s articles include: AI expected to expand today’s decision-making capabilities for imaging modalities; it’s important to educate patient’s about the role radiologists play in diagnosis; radiology reports need to include multi-media enhanced reporting; radiologists who use chest radiographs to diagnose COPD create false positive results; and a cardiovascular MR scan is a cost-effective way to scan large volumes of patients with a wide range of suspected heart conditions.

SIIM: AI poised to enhance all aspects of radiology – AuntminniePicture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Artificial intelligence (AI) will persistently and pervasively enhance all aspects of radiology, enabling precision medicine and potentially even finding disease before it becomes symptomatic, according to Dr. Keith Dreyer who spoke at the SIIM annual meeting. He adds that AI will expand today’s decision-making capabilities for both current and new imaging modalities, leading to greater detection and treatment of disease. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #22: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Health data limits, medical exam cost comparisons, and ACR

This week’s articles include: lack of access to health data could limit potential of machine learning; radiologists can simplify reports to improve readability; an app equips patients to review prices for more than 300 imaging procedures; ACR forms interdisciplinary organization to guide implementation of AI tools in radiology; and more women join ACR leadership but rates still lag.

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Could ‘Google Brain’ create technology to aid radiologists? – Radiology Business

Targeted training for radiologists to simplify report readability helps patients better understand radiology reports, according to a study. Radiologists took a one-hour workshop that emphasized writing with simple structure and brevity, using simpler words, phrases and sentence structures. A survey completed by the participants after the workshop showed that all participants believed they could change their writing styles, with 71 percent indicating their communication could be optimized for more effective communication. Continue reading