Diagnostic Reading #21: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Impact of emerging technologies on radiology makes headlinesX-ray technologist holding Carestream's DRX Detector

This week’s articles include: new audit shows causes of unnecessary CT and MR exams; analytics solutions expected to improve quality of care; photoacoustic imaging could guide breast cancer removal; population health management is the top driver of data analytics; and the debut of the first fully autonomous radiology interpretation system.

New audit pinpoints causes of ‘wasteful’ unnecessary scans – AuntminnieEurope

Radiologists’ failure to check the validity of requests for CT and MRI scans, along with ignorance among referring doctors of appropriateness criteria for imaging examinations, are the most important reasons for costly inappropriate requests of radiological exams, a new study from Saudi Arabia found. An audit of 674 CT and MRI scans revealed that 25% were inappropriate. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #20: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

PACS, cyber attacks, and mergers are in the news this week

Articles this week in Diagnostic Reading include: why radiology needs to define image storage guidelines; PACS alerts can boost communication with referrers; health services in the UK are recovering from last Friday’s cyber attack; hospital merger mania continues throughout the country; and registries can have real-time benefits for rads.

Why radiology – and radiologists – need defined image storage guidelines – Radiology BusinessRadiologist reading image

The sheer economy of storing images online should make it standard, but a maze of regulation and expensive penalties make it difficult for imaging providers to navigate the issue, according to a JACR article. Failure to maintain imaging up to state and federal standards can result in penalties up to $10,000 and place radiologists at risk of malpractice suits. If a lost or misplaced image results in patient injury, the radiologist personally bears responsibility. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #18: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Headlines include interoperability challenges in healthIT, and preventing rad burnout

This week’s articles include: radiology’s journey into transparency; Radiologist reading imagecombining 3D printing and special effects helps
surgeons become proficient by practicing with lifelike ETV training models; healthcare IT can only realize its full potential when the industry overcomes interoperability challenges; how radiologists can prevent burnout; and aging radiologists should consider a “phased in” plan to retirement that benefits themselves and their practices.

Look ahead: radiology’s journey into transparency – RSNA News

Health policy expert Richard Duszak, Jr., MD, offers a glimpse into the next chapter of healthcare where patients will expect transparency in delivery of healthcare systems. Digital forums will be available for patients to post information about their physicians and radiologists. Transparency means that some physicians will look good and some won’t. The opportunity exists to embrace and help lead this movement by developing metrics and platforms that provide meaningful information so patients know who radiologists are and what they do. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: May Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Happy May!

April showers bring May flowers – and a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!” We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to Anne O’Loughlin  who correctly guessed the April image challenge!  The correct answer was — a container of disposable cleaning wipes!

Happy guessing and good luck!

Diagnostic Reading #17: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

MRI and CT modalities are in the news this weekRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: cloud-based cardiac MRI analytics can provide diagnosis in 15 seconds; sharing best practices can reduce CT dose; new Society of Interventional Oncology is created; radiology should work with certified health records; and CMS permits high-risk patients to receive annual low-dose CT scans for lung cancer screening without cost sharing.

Thinking intelligently about heart matters – Radiology Business

Cardiac MRI can answer many clinical questions about the heart and great vessels better than other imaging modalities, including echocardiography, nuclear SPECT, and cardiac CT. However, cardiac MRI is labor intensive. A new cloud-based solution approved by the FDA provides automated, editable ventricle segmentations based on cardiac MRI images. This platform’s analytics can do in 15 seconds a task that takes a radiologist at least 30 minutes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #16: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Patient portals and outpatient imaging centers are in the newsRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: radiologists can play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis; education of  older patients is key to adoption of patient portals; including informal caregivers in discharge planning can cut readmissions by 25%; outpatient imaging centers are on the rise; and 83% of executives plan to invest in telehealth.

Cardiac findings in stroke: What radiologists need to know – AuntMinnie Europe

Advances in CT and MRI make it feasible to identify subtle cardiac pathologies responsible for strokes that used to remain unnoticed. This puts greater emphasis on the know-how of imaging professionals, according to Spanish researchers who received a prestigious magna cum laude award at ECR 2017. “Radiologists play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis and management,” noted Dr. Flavio Zuccarino and colleagues from the thoracic radiology section in the department of radiology at Hospital del Mar in Barcelona, Spain. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #14: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; and rads might need to update their CVs

This week’s articles include: HHS is on track to transfer 41% of its data to the cloud; imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; Italians report 30% drop in breast cancer due to screening; MRI might help determine treatment for patients with depression; and radiologists might want to update their CVs.

HHS goes from reluctant to eager cloud adopter – Health Management Technology

In 2015 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reported just 1% of all systems in the cloud. If all goes as planned, the agency will have almost 41% of all investments moving “in some way” to the cloud. One of the key turning points came when IT staff and mission owners tested tools and software. Moving the HHS financial management system to a shared service provider’s cloud also helped.

image of a cloud

cloud computing

Imaging providers need to do a better job of reaching disabled adults – Radiology Business

Adults with disabilities undergo colon cancer screening at a lower rate when compared to the general population. Studies have found adults with disabilities utilize less preventative care in general, but colorectal cancer screening is especially troublesome. It’s an easily treatable disease with an intensive exam—which can create additional barriers to care. The recent uptick in colon cancer in young Americans underscores the need for widespread screening. Continue reading

Healthcare Cloud Solutions: Evaluating 4 Key Components of Data Security

A technical brief for assessing cloud solution providers

The use of healthcare cloud solutions is on the rise. Research firm MarketsandMarkets predicts that healthcare spending on cloud services will reach $9.48 billion by 2020, a big leap from $3.73 billion in 2015.

Several drivers are fueling the surge including addressing medical staffing shortages. Other drivers are cost efficiency, patient facing tools, access to information, telemedicine, and necessary computing power for big data analysis, according to CloudTech. Also, new modalities for diagnostic imaging bring with them increased storage requirements, making the cloud an essential part of an enterprise imaging strategy, according to Winthrop-University Hospital in NY.image of lock on a cloud Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #13: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

New this week: big growth for big data; HIT moves patient data to the cloudDiagnostic Reading: Big Data

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: expect growth for big data and analytics; researchers are learning better ways to harness the power of predictive analytics; new vaccine that doesn’t require refrigeration could save children’s lives in developing countries; facial recognition software diagnoses rare diseases; and healthcare organizations move patient data to the cloud.

Big data, analytics to see double digit revenue growth through 2020 – Health Data Management

Worldwide revenues for big data and business analytics will reach $150.8 billion in 2017, an increase of 12 percent over 2016, according to a report from IDC. And these products and services are expected to maintain a compound annual growth rate of 12 percent through 2020, when revenues will be more than $210 billion, IDC said. Healthcare is among the industries that will experience the fastest growth in spending. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #12: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Dose reduction and new ultrasound application make headlines

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: new technique uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs; monitoring software that can reduce dose for pediatric patients; a “digital pathologist” can improve cancer detection; variation in imaging utilization impacts practicing radiologists; and a decade of improvements in CT innovation are not reaching patients in some European countries.

Fluid in the lungs being measured by a new technique using ultrasound – Health Imaging

Medical researchers and engineers from North Carolina State University have found a new approach that uses ultrasound to measure fluid levels in the lungs. The noninvasive approach can track progress in treating pulmonary edema, which is common in patients with congestive heart failure.lung filled with fluid Continue reading