In the news: medical devices might pose HIT risk; increase in radiology jobs

Articles include: medical devices offer risks for authorized access; ACR projects 16% job growth for radiologists in 2016; Stanford’s radiology department uses patient input to improve processes; FDA issued updated requirements Image of Healthcare Network Access

regarding 510(k) submissions for medical devices and software changes; and RSNA teams with The Sequoia Project to support the electronic exchange of medical images and related diagnostic reports.

Medical devices offer new risks for network access – Health Data Management

Hospitals typically have hundreds of medical devices, which represent an easy gateway for hackers. Newer medical devices might be more robust in the types and amounts of data they collect, and they might connect not only to the core network but also through Wi-Fi networks. A security consulting firm recommends healthcare facilities use “network segmentation,” so that devices are linked to a separate network.

ACR projects 16% job growth for radiologists in 2016 – Auntminnie

The number of new jobs available for radiologists in 2016 will be 16% higher than those available in 2015, according to the fifth annual workforce survey by the Commission on Human Resources at the American College of Radiology (ACR). The study was published online August 3 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Reliability, redundancy and mobility help provider keep pace with imaging needs Many radiology departments are feeling the pressure of “doing more with less”. For Columbus Regional Health in Indiana, the pressure was literal: the medical provider had to eliminate three RAD rooms yet maintain the same

Advisory Board Company’s Imaging Performance Partnership research offers insights for imaging leaders

Recent years have seen transformational change occur in the American health care market. Keegrowth-strategies-for-imagingping up with each development is daunting, but equally challenging is identifying the implications of these changes on the future of health care delivery and payment. Below are three major takeaways for imaging leaders, courtesy of the Advisory
Board Company’s Imaging Performance Partnership research team. This outlook can serve as a guide for forging a successful radiology strategy in 2016 and beyond.

  1. Explore screening and interventional radiology programs as growth opportunities

Recent years have seen low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening and CT colonography (CTC) receive approval from the United States Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF) as essential health benefits. These decisions open the door for radiology providers to provide these potentially life-saving services to patients in an affordable way, while also demonstrating radiology’s value proposition as a gateway to the health system. Many providers also are exploring mobile mammography and partnerships with employers as a way of growing their programs. In order to ensure the success of these new initiatives, it is vital to deploy marketing strategies to referring physicians about the benefits and potential harms of these services.

Similarly, interventional radiology (IR) has had new life breathed into the specialty as pioneers advance the list of procedures outside of vascular services. Additionally, IR is attractive to both patients and health systems due to its noninvasive nature, its low cost compared to surgical approaches and the great outcomes results. Institutions with existing IR programs should align their growth with non-procedural specialties like oncology, pediatrics and primary care. Several programs have also seen success marketing IR directly to patients who are seeking an alternative to invasive surgeries.

Image of Carestream’s Dan Monaghan

Dan Monaghan, Carestream Health, Introducing the AHRA Keynote Speaker

Before introducing the keynote speaker Monday at AHRA 2016, Carestream’s Dan Monaghan asked the radiology administrators in attendance three questions:

  1. Do you need more hours in the day?
  2. Do you wish you had more time and more energy?
  3. Could you use less stress and more fun in your life?

With hands raised and heads nodding, there was agreement that medical imaging directors are feeling the pressure of increased demands from hospital administrators, reimbursement changes and cost controls.

Speaker and author Christine Cashen took to the stage and used a mix of humor and relatable storytelling to compel AHRA attendees to change their perspectives and join her in the “Campaign to Stop Global Whining.”  Her message was simple: conflict is inevitable; different personalities require different approaches; only you can control your emotional state; and as a leader in your department, your positive energy will fuel your team’s success.

This shift in mindset can start with a few simple changes:

EMRs for healthIT and a new imaging modality are in the news

This week’s articles include: the VA has joined a program that makes it easier for patients to access their electronic medical records; a study examines whether hospitals hesitate to adopt order-entry clinical decision support tools CT Brain Scansthat could drive imaging referrals outside the system; researchers in Portugal are developing an endoscopic scanner that will provide advanced imaging within the body and aid in early detection of cancers that are often found too late; a couple in West Virginia filed a lawsuit against a radiology practice and an individual radiologist for overlooking a brain tumor in CT scans; and Facebook advertising can help speed patients with inflammatory back pain toward appropriate diagnostic procedures.

VA joins NATE, as record sharing movement gains momentum – Health Data Management

The National Association for Trusted Exchange (NATE) has taken another step forward in building momentum for enabling consumers to access and control their healthcare information. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has become the newest member of NATE, a private-public program that aims to make it easier for patients to securely access their records electronically and improve the HIE between data holders and healthcare consumers.