Diagnostic Reading #22: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Radiology & HealthcareIT New this week: advances in ultrasound and PET imaging.

This week’s articles in Diagnostic Reading include: more than 100 patients with advanced and medication-refractory Parkinson’s disease are undergoing focused ultrasound treatment as part of a pivotal study; Artificial intelligence  and wearable technology help predict health problems; biomarkers and PET imaging may predict cognitive decline to Alzheimer’s; fewer than 2% of heavy smokers received lung cancer screening in 2016; and use of EMRs (electronic medical records) can improve monitoring of long-term clinical trial outcomes.

AI, wearable technology collaborate to predict health problems – Clinical Innovation+Technology

Researchers from the University of Waterloo developed artificial intelligence (AI) capable of using wearable-collected data to predict the onset of health problems. The study aimed to outline a possible foundation for wearable technology and AI could partner to predict illness. Researchers hope the technology pairing could assess changes in aerobic responses to identify the onset of respiratory or cardiovascular disease.

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news.

Biomarkers, PET imaging may predict cognitive decline to Alzheimer’s – Health Imaging

Diagnostic tests alone may not be enough to help determine a patient’s risk of future cognitive decline, but a combination of biomarkers may help. New research published in JAMA found that a combination of positive results of flutemetamol F 18–labeled PET data, low volume of the hippocampus and cognitive status is associated with a higher risk of progression from amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) to Alzheimer’s disease within 36 months.

1st patient treated with focused ultrasound in ‘pivotal’ Parkinson’s trial – Health Imaging

The first patient to undergo focused ultrasound to limit the major symptoms of Parkinson’s disease has been treated in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial. The goal of the treatment is to manage the primary symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and limit side effects of medication so that less is needed. More than 100 patients with advanced and medication-refractory Parkinson’s disease are undergoing treatment as part of the study.

Fewer than 2% of heavy smokers received lung cancer screening in 2016 – Radiology Business

Just 1.9 percent of current and former heavy smokers received lung cancer screening in 2016, according to research that will be presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. Lung cancer screening rates are much lower than screening rates for breast and colorectal cancers. The study’s lead author said the U.S. needs an effective public service campaign to encourage lung cancer screening that is similar to campaigns that encouraged women to get mammograms.

Using EMRs to improve monitoring of long-term clinical trial outcomes – Clinical Innovation+Technology

Researchers used electronic medical records to improve clinical trials by expanding remote monitoring. Currently, clinical trials may face pressure to be completed in a short time due to limited resources, limiting their ability to track long-term outcomes. In this study, researchers evaluated the impact of using EMRs to follow up with patients after trial participation. Researchers “gained new insights from outcomes electronically recorded three years after the end of the trial and could then identify the differences between trial data and electronic data.”

#ultrasound #DiagnosticReading #medicalImaging #medicalDevice #EMR #AI

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