Diagnostic Reading #21: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

AI dominates radiology news once again.

This week’s articles in Diagnostic Reading include: computers that can interpret imaging studies might dramatically change the practice of radiology; researchers developed a machine learning software able to detect small vessel disease in brain CT scans with almost 90 percent accuracy; younger radiologists will need to adjust to an environment in which less time is spent on traditional tasks and more time is devoted to individualized patient care; radiologists now use Twitter for professional conversations and patient outreach; and an orthopaedist explains why weight-bearing CT imaging is a game changer for extremity reconstruction.

If you think AI will never replace radiologists—you may want to think again – Radiology Business

One of the most frequently discussed questions in radiology today is: What kind of long-term impact will artificial intelligence (AI) have on radiologists? Robert Schier, MD, wrote in a commentary published by the JACR that “The advent of computers that can accurately interpret diagnostic imaging studies will upend the practice of radiology.” He adds that the unanswered questions are just how much upending there will be and how long it will take to happen. Read an opposing view by Dr. Eliot Siegel.

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news.

AI software diagnoses stroke, dementia with 85% accuracy – Health Imaging

Researchers have developed machine learning software able to detect small vessel disease, a common cause of dementia and stroke, in brain CT scans with almost 90 percent accuracy. The researchers’ findings, published in Radiology, may help physicians better predict a person’s risk of developing dementia and administer treatment more quickly during an emergency. The software can pinpoint and diagnose small vessel disease, which reduces blood flow to white matter connections in the brain, kills brain cells and causes stroke or dementia.

A lack of communication skills—not AI—is the greatest threat to millennial radiologists – Radiology Business

Millennials growing up in an evolving world of digital connection might be drawn to the high-tech nature of radiology, but those same prospective physicians should be wary of their bedside manner, according to Amber Pokorney, chief research MRI technologist at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. She observed the different generations at work and reports that younger radiologists will need to adjust to an environment in which less time is spent on repetitive, finicky tasks and more time is devoted to individualized patient care.

Tracking Twitter: Popularity of radiology-related hashtags has skyrocketed – Radiology Business

Twitter is now commonly used among radiologists for professional conversations and patient outreach. Analyzing Twitter trends with particular attention to content and usage data can provide valuable insights into how social media has grown within the radiology community.

Extremity reconstruction’s game changer: Weight-bearing CT imaging – Everything Rad

Dr. Lew Schon, orthopedic surgeon, explains why a new CT extremity system has the potential to refine clinical skills, create new surgical techniques, and offer greater intelligence for more predictable outcomes.

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