Diagnostic Reading #20: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

PACS, cyber attacks, and mergers are in the news this week

Articles this week in Diagnostic Reading include: why radiology needs to define image storage guidelines; PACS alerts can boost communication with referrers; health services in the UK are recovering from last Friday’s cyber attack; hospital merger mania continues throughout the country; and registries can have real-time benefits for rads.

Why radiology – and radiologists – need defined image storage guidelines – Radiology BusinessRadiologist reading image

The sheer economy of storing images online should make it standard, but a maze of regulation and expensive penalties make it difficult for imaging providers to navigate the issue, according to a JACR article. Failure to maintain imaging up to state and federal standards can result in penalties up to $10,000 and place radiologists at risk of malpractice suits. If a lost or misplaced image results in patient injury, the radiologist personally bears responsibility. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #19: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Artificial intelligence in radiology leads this week’s news

This week’s Diagnostic Reading articles include: AI algorithms show promise in performing medical work; many radiologists prefer two monitors or more; AI’s most important application in radiology might be visualizing features on images that reflect genomic or diagnostic properties radiologists don’t see today; radiology residency is changing; and FDA warns natural health company about making marketing claims for a breast thermography system it has not approved.

AI in medicine: rise of the machines – ForbesRadiologist reading image

A radiologist-authored blog discusses how new “deep learning” artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms are showing promise in performing medical work that was believed to only be capable of being done by physicians. For example, deep learning algorithms have been able to diagnose the presence or absence of tuberculosis in chest X-ray images with 96% accuracy. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #18: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Headlines include interoperability challenges in healthIT, and preventing rad burnout

This week’s articles include: radiology’s journey into transparency; Radiologist reading imagecombining 3D printing and special effects helps
surgeons become proficient by practicing with lifelike ETV training models; healthcare IT can only realize its full potential when the industry overcomes interoperability challenges; how radiologists can prevent burnout; and aging radiologists should consider a “phased in” plan to retirement that benefits themselves and their practices.

Look ahead: radiology’s journey into transparency – RSNA News

Health policy expert Richard Duszak, Jr., MD, offers a glimpse into the next chapter of healthcare where patients will expect transparency in delivery of healthcare systems. Digital forums will be available for patients to post information about their physicians and radiologists. Transparency means that some physicians will look good and some won’t. The opportunity exists to embrace and help lead this movement by developing metrics and platforms that provide meaningful information so patients know who radiologists are and what they do. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: May Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Happy May!

April showers bring May flowers – and a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!” We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to Anne O’Loughlin  who correctly guessed the April image challenge!  The correct answer was — a container of disposable cleaning wipes!

Happy guessing and good luck!

The Impact of AI and Big Data on the Future of Radiology

Radiologists becoming more like information managers and image processing specialists

Haga clic aquí para leer la versión en español de este blog.

for screen readers

Dr. Pablo Valdés is vice-chairman of the Spanish radiologists’ society – Spanish Society of Medical Radiology (SERAM).

In this interview with Everything Rad, he looks at the not-too-distant future of radiology. He proposes that innovations such as artificial intelligence, robotics and Big Data will require radiologists to transform to information managers and specialists in image processing who will contribute decisively to patient well-being and the sustainability of the health care system.   Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #17: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

MRI and CT modalities are in the news this weekRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: cloud-based cardiac MRI analytics can provide diagnosis in 15 seconds; sharing best practices can reduce CT dose; new Society of Interventional Oncology is created; radiology should work with certified health records; and CMS permits high-risk patients to receive annual low-dose CT scans for lung cancer screening without cost sharing.

Thinking intelligently about heart matters – Radiology Business

Cardiac MRI can answer many clinical questions about the heart and great vessels better than other imaging modalities, including echocardiography, nuclear SPECT, and cardiac CT. However, cardiac MRI is labor intensive. A new cloud-based solution approved by the FDA provides automated, editable ventricle segmentations based on cardiac MRI images. This platform’s analytics can do in 15 seconds a task that takes a radiologist at least 30 minutes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #16: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Patient portals and outpatient imaging centers are in the newsRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: radiologists can play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis; education of  older patients is key to adoption of patient portals; including informal caregivers in discharge planning can cut readmissions by 25%; outpatient imaging centers are on the rise; and 83% of executives plan to invest in telehealth.

Cardiac findings in stroke: What radiologists need to know – AuntMinnie Europe

Advances in CT and MRI make it feasible to identify subtle cardiac pathologies responsible for strokes that used to remain unnoticed. This puts greater emphasis on the know-how of imaging professionals, according to Spanish researchers who received a prestigious magna cum laude award at ECR 2017. “Radiologists play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis and management,” noted Dr. Flavio Zuccarino and colleagues from the thoracic radiology section in the department of radiology at Hospital del Mar in Barcelona, Spain. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #14: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; and rads might need to update their CVs

This week’s articles include: HHS is on track to transfer 41% of its data to the cloud; imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; Italians report 30% drop in breast cancer due to screening; MRI might help determine treatment for patients with depression; and radiologists might want to update their CVs.

HHS goes from reluctant to eager cloud adopter – Health Management Technology

In 2015 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reported just 1% of all systems in the cloud. If all goes as planned, the agency will have almost 41% of all investments moving “in some way” to the cloud. One of the key turning points came when IT staff and mission owners tested tools and software. Moving the HHS financial management system to a shared service provider’s cloud also helped.

image of a cloud

cloud computing

Imaging providers need to do a better job of reaching disabled adults – Radiology Business

Adults with disabilities undergo colon cancer screening at a lower rate when compared to the general population. Studies have found adults with disabilities utilize less preventative care in general, but colorectal cancer screening is especially troublesome. It’s an easily treatable disease with an intensive exam—which can create additional barriers to care. The recent uptick in colon cancer in young Americans underscores the need for widespread screening. Continue reading

Radiology Equipment Selection Begins with Understanding Workflows

9 questions to answer before researching equipment

Radiology equipment selection for imaging rooms is among the most important decisions a hospital or imaging facility will make. Choosing the imaging product best suited to your workflow and imaging needs can help your doctors make quicker diagnoses and give you a faster return on investment. The right diagnostic imaging equipment also can help reduce x-ray exam times and increase patient comfort.

Selecting the wrong product can negatively affect imaging workflow and owner costs. Considering that the average lifespan of digital radiography equipment is 20 years, it is critical to make a well-informed decision.

90% of successful product selection comes from understanding clinical and ergonomic workflows

During my 10 years of advising medical imaging facilities on equipment purchases, I’ve found that some facilities don’t fully understand their imaging needs. Others might understand them, but have not documented their needs well enough to share with the prospective vendor. This makes it hard for the supplier to recommend the most appropriate solution. It also makes it difficult for you to compare products from different vendors. Continue reading

How Can You Measure Innovation in Diagnostic Imaging?

Patents and industry recognition are two ways to quantify it

Innovation in diagnostic imaging and healthIT is continually evolving, improving their potential to help provide better patient care and at less cost.

But how can you measure innovation? Patents and industry recognition are two ways. Please indulge us while we share some of our accomplishments from 2016. And if you’d like a preview of our plans to advance imaging capture this year, read the recent blog by our president of Digital Medical Solutions, Jianqing Bennett.

Let’s start with patents. In 2016, we were awarded 43 new patents from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for innovation in radiographycone beam CT imaginghealthcare IT, and other areas. We also received 52 additional patents in European and Asian countries.

The patents earned by Carestream’s smart scientists and engineers include:

  • New medical image capture technologies related to the development of cone beam computed tomography (CT) systems designed for orthopaedic extremity imaging
  • Enhancements to our portfolio of healthcare IT systems that manage, store, and share patient data and medical imaging exams
  • Continued technology advances in our growing portfolio of radiology systems that can enhance diagnostic image quality for a wide range of healthcare providers
  • Continued advancements in laser imagers that provide affordable output of digital X-ray exams onto medical film and paper Continue reading