Everything Rad: Top 7 Blogs in Diagnostic Imaging

As 2016 winds down, we take time for a Radiology Year in Review on Everything Rad.  There was considerable innovation and disruption in radiology and health IT imaging in 2016. The themes and conversations at diagnostic imaging sites and in media publications were reflected in our blogs. For our 2016 Radiology Year in Review, we are sharing the 7 blogs from Everything Rad that generated the most shares and likes.

What would you like us to write about in 2017? Would you like to be a guest author?  Post your suggestions and comments on this blog or email us at socialmedia@www.carestream.com.  We’d love to hear from you.

image of 2016 coming to a cloae

Baystate Health’s Regional HIE Invites Outside Providers to Participate to Help Enhance Patient Care

Baystate Health is an integrated delivery network (IDN) that includes five hospitals and more than 90 primary and specialty care practices serving a region of western Massachusetts with 800,000 residents. Patients that come to their facilities are also visiting other facilities outside of their network. Neil R. Kudler, MD, Chief Medical Information Officer at Baystate Health, shares the steps that Baystate Health is taking to reduce the chance that patients might be at risk of receiving duplicate procedures and imaging exams.

Reducing Sonographer Injuries Takes a Team Approach

Ultrasound is growing in popularity and its increased demand is impacting sonographers’ workload. An increase in the number of exams is placing added strain on sonographers who are already at risk of injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome from repetitive motions. The risk of injury can be minimized if sonographers, hospital and radiology department managers, and manufacturers work together.

Fitness trackers, Facebook, and apps are in the newsMoney and Healthcare

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: analysis indicates healthcare spending does not translate to better outcomes; fitness trackers can help surgeons monitor patient recovery; ED providers lack knowledge about patient radiation dose from various modalities; Facebook posts can reveal warning signs for mental illness; and a smartphone app can detect autism in less than a minute.

Getting better healthcare for much less money – Health Management Technology (Forbes)

According to a recent statistical analysis, medical care determines only about 11 percent of health—far less than individual behavior (38 percent), social circumstances (23 percent), and genetics and biology (21 percent). Evidence demonstrates that much of what is spent on healthcare does not translate into better health outcomes.

Radiologists taking on larger educational role

Diagnostic Reading: person watching a video

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: radiology is educating patients through informative online videos; radiologists can affect public health through their role in cancer screening; data collected from EHRs, registries, and wearable technology can be valuable sources of data in helping the FDA make regulatory decisions about the safety and effectiveness of medical devices; If a patient commits suicide after receiving imaging results he or she perceives to be bad news, could the radiologist be held responsible?; and a U.S. doctor with cancer smuggled in a vaccine from Cuba and it appears to be helping.

Lights, camera, imaging! Online videos can have a big impact on radiology – Health Imaging

The radiology industry continues to find new ways to take advantage of technological advances. According to a recent study, radiology is now educating patients through informative online videos. One of the first thing patients do when they think they might need an examination is look it up online—and when those frantic searches reveal helpful video content, it’s going to help answer a whole lot of questions.

Threats, burnout, and demand for radiology top the news

image of radiograph

Articles include: the three biggest threats to radiologists; marketing tactics for imaging service providers; a survey of 2,000 patients reported they want radiologists to read their imaging exams; a study that shows 49% of radiologists feel burned out recommends they try to improve their life balance before making career changes; and an initiative of the American Society of Clinical Oncology to collect and analyze cancer data is starting to take off.

The 3 biggest threats to radiology – AuntMinnie

Three trends might degrade the role of radiologists: demand for imaging is moving out of hospitals; bundled payments and capitation turn imaging into a cost rather than a profit center; and machine learning is on the rise.

Tactics for marketing a radiology department – Radiology Business

A paper described the need for imaging service providers to have a successful business strategy that involves marketing tactics focused on patients and different efforts that target referring physicians.

EHRs and security threats for healthIT and rads taking a leadership role are in the news

Articles include: Mamba ransomware is attacking healthcare, crippling computers by encrypting entire hard drives; University of Texas breast radiologists are calling for the creation of a national imaging repository in the cloud; Apple designers work to expand its HealthKit to aid in diagnosis; Electronic health record data could hold the key to predicting the onset of sepsis; and most physicians are using some digital tools and expect to increase the use of assistive technologies in the near future.

 

New virus disables computers by encrypting hard drives – Health Data Management

A new strain of ransomware called Mamba is circulating through multiple industries including healthcare and crippling computers by encrypting entire hard drives. So far there really isn’t much that can be done except pay the ransom to gain a key to decrypt the hard drive, experts say. Ironically, Mamba emulates protections found in commercial data security products, but uses the protections against the victim.open lock