SIIM 2017 Explores Radiology’s Changing Role in Imaging Informatics

SIIM17 presenters discuss radiology’s role in enterprise imaging and AI, and adding value

Although the titles and topics of #SIIM17 presentations varied, there was a common and clear message: the role of radiologists in imaging informatics is changing. This evolution can range from acquiring different skill sets to taking on entirely new roles including:

  • adopting a leadership role in enterprise imaging that spans multiple departments;
  • being more accessible to physicians and more visible to patients;
  • and taking stewardship of emerging artificial intelligence applications.

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Streamlining Clinical Workflows in Vascular Ultrasound

Automation increases efficiency and reduces stress on sonographers

Sometimes less is better than more. It’s certainly true for clinical workflows in vascular ultrasound.

For example, with Pulse Wave (PW /Spectral) Doppler imaging, it typically takes five steps to capture velocity profile and ten to capture volume profile. But CARESTREAM’s Smart Flow Assist technology reduces the steps to only two by eliminating the need for repeated manual adjustments.diagram showing reduced steps

Spectral Doppler imaging is commonly performed to quantify flow profiles in blood vessels. The measurement is displayed as a waveform trace, depicting the velocity distribution (profile) at the given spatial location as a function of time. Capturing the velocity profile requires five steps:

  1. Turn on Color Flow mode to obtain the orientation of the vessel
  2. Turn on PW Doppler mode
  3. Update the beam steering direction
  4. Move the gate to obtain the highest velocity, and
  5. Angle-correct the gate

Each step requires manual effort by the sonographer. Moreover, the typical clinical workflow in vascular ultrasound requires repeated manual adjustments each time the transducer is moved. Steps 3 to 5 must be repeated with each movement of the transducer.   Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #14: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; and rads might need to update their CVs

This week’s articles include: HHS is on track to transfer 41% of its data to the cloud; imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; Italians report 30% drop in breast cancer due to screening; MRI might help determine treatment for patients with depression; and radiologists might want to update their CVs.

HHS goes from reluctant to eager cloud adopter – Health Management Technology

In 2015 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reported just 1% of all systems in the cloud. If all goes as planned, the agency will have almost 41% of all investments moving “in some way” to the cloud. One of the key turning points came when IT staff and mission owners tested tools and software. Moving the HHS financial management system to a shared service provider’s cloud also helped.

image of a cloud

cloud computing

Imaging providers need to do a better job of reaching disabled adults – Radiology Business

Adults with disabilities undergo colon cancer screening at a lower rate when compared to the general population. Studies have found adults with disabilities utilize less preventative care in general, but colorectal cancer screening is especially troublesome. It’s an easily treatable disease with an intensive exam—which can create additional barriers to care. The recent uptick in colon cancer in young Americans underscores the need for widespread screening. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #51: 5 “Must Read” Articles on HIT & Radiology

Headlines include imaging’s possible role in combatting food shortages; consumers want access to health records

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: PET imaging might play a role in studying pest resistance to help combat global food shortages; providers’ inability to share data hurts patient satisfaction; poll reveals Americans don’t want insurers to limit treatment decisions; unpaid caregivers are gaining recognition for their contributions to the delivery of healthcare; and a startup company will develop a mobile app to help opioid users in need of emergency care.

Researchers use radioactive tracer, PET imaging to fight hunger – Health Imaging

As the global population grows at a rate of 88 million people per year, researchers are using advanced nuclear methods to study pest resistance in corn that could make significant strides toward solving global food shortages.image of empty bowl

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