Ultrasound Touch Panel: Your Customizable Ultrasound Machine

Innovation is easier when you start with a clean slate

Sometimes great ideas, like Carestream’s customizable ultrasound touch panel, need to wait for a confluence of factors to impel their implementation. German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer Touch Ultrasounddescribed this path to product design—a great idea is at first ridiculed, then violently opposed and finally, accepted as obvious1. Certainly many innovations followed this path. Mary Anderson, an American rancher and real estate developer, was turned away for her 1902 invention, the windshield wiper, though Cadillac adopted it after the patent expired.

Carestream was able to design our Touch Prime Ultrasound from a clean slate—no pre-existing technology kept us from producing it. Its all-touch panel lets each sonographer enjoy a customized ultrasound machine.

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Orthopaedic Practice: 4 Ways to Increase Revenue

In-house imaging provides orthopaedic practices with ancillary revenue stream

“Where you win or lose the game in a medical practice is on the revenue side of the balance sheet.”

Orthopaedic practices, like all medical practices, are feeling the pinch of increased costs, reimbursement pressure, and time-consuming administrative procedures. But on the positive side, there are many opportunities to increase revenue to make your orthopedic practice not only more Chart shows revenue increasingprofitable, but more efficient, for and more satisfying for your patients.

The AAOS created a useful 45-page guide, Enhancing Your Practices Revenue: Pearls and Pitfalls (A Primer for Orthopaedic Surgeons (1). It gives excellent recommendations for adding services, staff, and equipment that are likely to generate incremental revenue in an orthopedic practice.

These suggestions include Non-Physician Extenders (NPEs) such as Physician Assistants (PAs), Nurse Practitioners (NPs), and Athletic Trainers (AT/ATCs), who can “increase physician productivity, patient satisfaction, quality of care, and physician revenue.” Another idea for ancillary revenue generation for orthopedic practices is to add non-surgical physicians who can provide coverage when the surgeon is in the OR. Urgent care centers are another opportunity to make use of your physical set-up and location to build revenue after hours or on weekends.

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Medical Device Decision Priorities—a Worldwide Look

Throughout the U.S. and worldwide, equipment decision criteria are not so different

There are clear advantages to having new, up-to-date medical devices; including gains in productivity and efficiency. Medical equipment can support the movement to reduce healthcare costs and increase its efficiency and effectiveness. This movement is worldwide, and nothing new, as a graphic on medical device prioritiesMcKinsey report[1] stated a few years ago. “Today, medical device companies operate in a different world. In developed countries, healthcare systems are under acute financial pressure…. Developing economies are transforming the environment, too…. Success in emerging markets requires a deep understanding of stakeholders’ needs.”

New stakeholders influence purchase decisions

And new stakeholders are changing the way organizations look at the purchase of medical equipment. “In the developed world, decisions that used to be the sole preserve of doctors are now also made by regulators, hospital administrators, and other non-clinicians…. The result of this phenomenon is a shift from individual outcomes to a focus on population-level effectiveness.” Also, big data is beginning to offer a new level of evidence-based data that helps us evaluate the true advantages of technology.

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Heathcare IT, Your Cloud has Arrived Courtesy of Intel (and Carestream)

Preparing for the next-generation of medical imaging data and analytics

Today, the cloud is a grownup with a seat at the IT table. The major issues around the cloud (security, access and speed) have been satisfactorily resolved by industries outside of healthcare: technology, software, financial services, Cloud_imageand retail have been using the cloud for years.

Of course, healthcare does have its own unique issues of privacy, security and access that make it slow to adopt any new technology, and the cloud has been no exception. But progress has been made. In a recent annual study of 125 large and small cloud users, for the first time in 2016, security was not the first concern mentioned. Technology has jumped ahead to meet the challenges of healthcare’s journey to value.

The cloud is an essential part of the healthcare industry’s IT structure/restructure to reduce costs, increase clinical collaboration and speed up clinicians’ access to information. As larger study files boost storage requirements, Intel and Carestream have partnered in Intel’s Storage Builder Program. The purpose of the collaboration is to blend Carestream’s expertise in healthcare information systems with Intel’s technological prowess to increase the performance of Carestream’s PACS and RIS systems and to make them more useful to clinicians.  For example, Carestream recently deployed the new Intel® Solid-State Drive (SSD) Data Center (DC) Family for PCle® P3700 featuring Non-Volatile Memory Express™ (NVMe™) and observed a threefold increase in throughput in that portion of the Carestream Vue workflow.

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Healthcare Reform Opens Doors for Mobile Screening Mammography Services

The 2012 RSNA meeting marked the 30th anniversary of the show from which Debora Wright’s mobile mammography screening business, Inner Images, was born. Three decades later, the current healthcare climate set a different at the meeting, but for Debora and Inner Images,  reform has opened doors and growth.

In this video, we speak with Debora from RSNA 2012 about how the move to digital mammography has helped her business’ productivity through this growth period.


Are you excited about the direction mammography is heading? What changes or benefits do you think we might see at next year’s RSNA?

Reflections on RSNA 2012 and the Progress in Intelligent Information Systems

On the last day of RSNA 2012, Dr. Eliot Siegel, Professor and Vice Chair University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Chief of Imaging at VA Maryland Healthcare System in Baltimore, and a member of Carestream’s Advisory Group, a collective of medical professionals that advises the company on healthcare IT trends, stopped by the Carestream booth to reflect on the focus on imaging informatics at this year’s event. Dr. Siegel comments on the opportunity to use information systems to empower and educate patients,  to make radiology more visible in patient care, and to drive the future of radiology.

What IT innovations caught your attention at RSNA? 

Live Interview from RSNA: MidCentral District Health Board in New Zealand

Diane Orange, Radiology Department Manager, MidCentral District Health Board in New Zealand, traveled a far distance to attend RSNA this week in Chicago, but it has been well worth the trip. A highlight for Di has been the opportunity to see how her radiology department is at the forefront of many of the themes discussed as imperatives for radiology like expanding the reach of diagnostic imaging into other clinical specialties and innovative approaches to image exchange.

In the video interview featured below, Di  shares how an integrated RIS/PACS system from Carestream has reduced report turnaround. Orange also offers feedback on the new technologies she’s seen at RSNA, including the DRX-Revolution and Carestreams CS 9300 conebeam CT system. Also hear her vision for the future of image sharing.

RSNA ’12 Preview: Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and PACS Integration

Anne Richards, Carestream

Anne Richards, Clinical Development Manager, Women’s Healthcare, Carestream

When RSNA opens on Sunday, we can expect digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to dominate the attention of providers and radiologists interested in women’s imaging. A scan of the scientific and educational sessions featured in AuntMinnie’s “Road to RSNA 2012: Women’s Imaging Preview” highlights the early evidence of increased cancer detection and lower recall rates, which is driving interest in DBT in spite of lingering questions about reimbursement.

For providers who have adopted or on the cusp of offering DBT, however, we expect the discussions in the exhibit halls to extend beyond potential clinical benefits to the IT considerations raised by DBT early adopters. For example, DiagnosticImaging.com reported earlier this Spring on a KLAS report that highlighted the PACS integration challenges of DBT:
“Doctors are reporting interruptions in their day because not all PACS accept tomosynthesis studies. “It has created a workflow concern for radiologists who have to leave their office or reading room and come out to the tomosynthesis workstation to read the study,” said Monique Rasband, author of the report, Women’s Imaging 2012: Tomosynthesis Makes a Splash.” The doctors do say, however, that this extra time seems worth the effort because of the procedure’s effectiveness, she said.
While capturing the best breast images possible is important, it is just one piece of the care continuum. For DBT to succeed the reading environment must help radiologists make a fast, accurate diagnosis with minimal disruption to the diagnostic workflow.

 

At RSNA, we’ll be demonstrating our Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) Module for our CARESTREAM Vue Mammo Workstation that lets radiologists read all procedures from a single desktop. The workstation displays digital breast tomosynthesis studies, traditional mammograms, breast ultrasound, breast MRI and general radiology exams to help equip radiologists to work efficiently from a single desktop.

 

Here a quick video overview of how it works:

Comparison tools enable radiologists to use personalized hanging protocols for DBT exams along with other procedures. Specialized tools can further enhance productive reading: automatic positioning of DBT and mammograms eliminates manual manipulations; automatic “same sizing” of DBT and mammograms aid in comparing changes in anatomy; and concurrent magnifying glasses provided close-up comparison of pathology across multiple views and procedures. DBT exams can be viewed in cine mode or by scrolling.

If digital breast tomosynthesis is on your agenda at RSNA, swing by the Carestream booth (#2636) to get hands on with our DBT module or schedule your appointment now. 

Reading Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Exams From a Single Desktop

Anne Richards, Carestream

Anne Richards, Clinical Development Manager, Women’s Healthcare, Carestream

A recent article in the Wall Street Journal on 3-D mammography discussed the potential for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to enhance the detection of cancers. I was reminded of how important it is to not only capture the best breast images possible, but also to have an efficient and effective system that helps radiologists make an accurate diagnosis.

As I revisited the accomplishments our team has achieved in designing a new module that displays DBT exams on our mammography workstation—while also displaying digital mammograms, breast ultrasound, breast MRI and general radiology exams from a single desktop—I was struck by how easy it is (or could have been) to add yet another dedicated workstation to the radiology reading environment and then falsely believe we have actually improved the diagnostic workflow.

We resisted that path. Our team has long demonstrated our commitment to supporting multiple digital breast imaging modalities on our mammography workstations, and we have fiercely resisted the temptation add new, single-use workstations that might seem alluring because of their “dedicated” nature—when in fact they add costs and create inefficiency. Supporting multiple breast imaging modalities—as well as general radiology exams—enables radiologists to deliver a faster diagnosis to referring physicians and can ultimately enhance patient care.

Our smartly designed tomosynthesis module streamlines workflow by allowing healthcare providers to store, route, display and query/retrieve DBT exams from DICOM-compliant acquisition devices, so radiologists have all the tools they need on one workstation. Comparison tools enable radiologists to use personalized hanging protocols for DBT exams along with other procedures, especially the 2D mammograms. In addition, specialized tools that further enhance productivity include: automatic positioning of DBT and mammograms that eliminates manual manipulations; automatic “same sizing” of DBT and mammograms that aid in comparing changes in anatomy; and concurrent magnifying glasses that provide close-up comparison of pathology across multiple views and procedures.

With our advanced sys­tem, radiologists can quickly and easily read exams from all modalities and vendors at a single workstation. And working smart is an important element in improving patient care.

How do you view or plan to view digital breast tomosynthesis? What do you think about 3D breast imaging?

Webinar: IT Strategies for Imaging Growth & Quality Outcomes

Mary Tierney

Mary Tierney, VP, Chief Content Officer, TriMed Media Group

Earlier this month CMIO Magazine unveiled a new name, Clinical Innovation + Technology, and website, Clinical-Innovation.com. Our new focus mirrors healthcare’s technology-fueled transformation where C-suite executives are tasked with blending clinical and technological innovations to deploy new care processes and practices, evidence-based medicine and decision support, and enhancing communication and information access  across the care continuum through interoperability of clinical devices and IT systems.

Next week in a free Webinar, sponsored by Carestream, we’ll be looking at how this new environment – spurred by the convergence of reform and big data – is impacting the CXO’s approach to operational design in medical imaging.

You’ll hear from:

Kristina Kermanshahche, Chief Architect of Health for Intel Corporation

Maureen Gaffney, RN, the CMIO at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, New York

and

Dr. Eliot Siegel, Professor and Vice Chair University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, and Chief of Imaging at VA Maryland Healthcare System in Baltimore.

Our panelists will detail how CXOs can collaborate with radiology and IT on intelligent IT strategies that do far more than improve department or hospital productivity and efficiency. These strategies must also facilitate image exchange, mobile access and patient empowerment, while unlocking new financial models for growth and scale and supporting imaging’s inclusion in health reforms like meaningful use Stage 2 and the position within the broader picture of health IT.

Please join us and participate in our live Q&A on September 18 at 2 p.m. EST.  Register for the event today!