Forecasting the Enterprise Imaging Platform of the Future

NYU Winthrop Hospital reviews four drivers that will impact your  imaging strategy

Reflect in crystal ball

From presidential elections to wearable devices, there are multiple forces shaping healthcare. As administrative director at NYU Winthrop Hospital, it’s my job to make sure that our enterprise imaging platform can evolve with the changes.

MACRA, of course, will bring considerable change.  That topic alone is worthy of its own blog. For now, I will focus on four other key drivers that are shaping our enterprise imaging strategy for the future:

  • Impact of switching from fee-for-service to value-based care
  • Increased clinical collaboration
  • Patient engagement
  • Increased interactivity and interoperability

Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #17: Five “Must Read” Articles

Health imaging, contact sports and patient engagement are in the spotlight

This week’s articles include: a radiologist spearheads improvements at a Texas hospital; measurable changes can occur inside young athletes’ brains in a single season of contact sports; patient engagement is becoming essential to getting maximum payment for services; a study reports that one-third of radiology recommendations went unacknowledged at a Boston facility; and admissions growth for U.S. hospitals is unlikely to be repeated in 2016.

How radiologists can lead the way in healthcare quality improvement – Health Imaging

When quality improvement efforts at the Baylor College of Medicine stalled out due to multiple staffing disruptions and a general lack of coordination, it was a radiologist who took the challenge head-on, according to Emily Sedgwick, MD, an assistant professor and author of a recent article in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Changes to brain cells measurable after one season of high school football – Health Imaging Carestream-head-trauma

A single season spent playing contact sports is all it takes for measurable changes to occur inside young athletes’ brains, according to results of a study recently published in the Journal of Neurotrauma. Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas used helmets capable of recording data related to head impacts, then used MRI and diffusional kurtosis imaging to measure changes in neural cellular structures. They found that even when no concussion occurs, athletes experience neurological changes at the cellular level after just one season. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #6: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

This week’s articles focus on the role information technology will play in the moon shot for healthcare, topics CIOs should consider when managing PACS technology, the persistent value of the stethoscope, a program in which radiologists learn how to give patients good and bad news, and a projection that U.S. funding for on-demand healthcare companies will quadruple to reach $1 billion by the end of 2017.

Health spending in 2015 eclipsed $3.2 trillion a year, or 18 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. CMS projects healthcare spending to reach $4.3 trillion by 2020 (18.5 percent of Diagnostic Reading PACSGDP) and $5.4 trillion by 2024 (19.6 percent of GDP). Here are six critical components for a moon shot that would give healthcare a chance to reach the ultimate goals it needs to achieve. Information technology isn’t the only answer in many of these, but it can play a powerful supporting role.

PACS can represent a particular challenge for CIOs. The technology has evolved from being confined to a silo within the radiology Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #5: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

This week’s articles focus on: automated email messaging to engage patients in their own care; five healthcare trends to watch in 2016; why the IT transformation is creating a growing need for CIOs; adding an annual pledge for healthcare facilities that participate in the Image Wisely program; and the move to spend more healthcare IT dollars on analytics, patient engagement, customer relationship management and cybersecurity.

A healthcare startup made a wild pitch to Cara Waller, CEO of the Newport Orthopedic Institute in Newport Beach. The company said it could get patients more engaged by “automating” physician empathy and told Waller Diagnostic Reading, Patient Engagementits messaging technology would improve their satisfaction and help keep them out of the hospital. High satisfaction scores and low readmission rates mean higher reimbursements from Medicare, so Waller was intrigued. So far, she’s been surprised at patients’ enthusiasm for the personalized—but automated—daily emails they receive from their doctor. Continue reading

Apps Watch in Healthcare

Incorporating patient-generated data to assist diagnosis.

Demonstrating the APP for Fosters

Apps Watch

From time to time, we report news and perspectives on the latest in healthcare app development, and the use and potential for new apps in healthcare, and especially radiology.

Incorporating patient-generated data to assist diagnosis.

Several key trends in healthcare are converging to change the way we collect and employ data to help clinicians collaborate for the benefit of patient outcomes. Patient portals today often give patients the ability not only to view their own medical records, but also to supplement them with personal observations and findings that can often aid the clinician in a diagnosis and in the evaluation of a course of treatment.

A recent Harvard Business Review article by John Halamka, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) describes how this newly possible collaboration between a patient and his doctors Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #4: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Our Diagnostic Reading Top Picks

This week’s articles describe the high priority radiologists Diagnostic Reading #5 - Radiology and Health IT Articlesplace integrating PACS with an EHR, expected growth for the global ultrasound market, patients’ desire for personalized treatment, Radiology Today’s top picks for areas within the imaging space that promise the greatest innovations and a study that indicates mentally demanding activities may play an important role in maintaining a healthy brain.

With such a wide variety of PACS and electronic health records (EHRs) in the marketplace, decision-makers at hospitals and private practices have a lot to consider when purchasing new equipment. If they want to keep their radiologists happy, they may want to make sure the PACS can be properly integrated with the EHR. According to a recent study published by the Journal of the American College of Radiology, an integrated EHR is a bigger priority to radiologists than having access to the most advanced clinical features.

The global ultrasound marke Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #3 – Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Several top news sources recently published articles that contain helpful insights for radiology and healthcare IT professionals

This diagnostic reading articles describe how the Internet and mobile technologies have led to higher patient expectations, why radiologists need to maintain good relationships with other clinicians and patients to be effective, nine trends to watch in 2016, patient opinions on acceptable ways to share their health information and the latest tactics being employed for cancer detection and treatment.Carestream Diagnostic Radiology Articles

Eight-nine percent of healthcare providers say technology has changed patient expectations, according to a recent EMC report. Respondents to the survey, which polled 236 healthcare leaders from 18 countries, said more than half of their patients wanted faster access to services. 45 percent wanted 24/7 access and connectivity and 42 percent wanted access on more devices. Another 47 percent said they wanted “personalized” experiences.

While office colleagues are integral to a radiologist’s success, they can’t be the only other players to comprise the team. To be truly effective, radiologists must cultivate and maintain open relationships with other stakeholders – referring physicians, hospitals, technologists, and, most importantly, patients.

Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #2: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

This week’s diagnostic reading articles describe the need to deploy Healthcare Vue for Radiology enterprise image viewers, growing adoption of telemedicine tools by healthcare providers, changes expected in data security, cloud and mobile technologies, why radiologists need to lead change and how patient-centric care can result in shorter perceived wait times and greater satisfaction.

Providers have more work to do to expand enterprise image viewing, which gives clinicians the ability to quickly view patient images without limitations on where they can view them, according to the results of a new HIMSS Analytics survey. The survey of 144 hospital, health system and ambulatory PACS/radiology leaders, follows a similar study conducted by HIMSS Analytics in late 2014 to gauge trends in provider adoption of enterprise image viewing. Less than half of respondents indicated that they use an enterprise image viewer to meet their diagnostic imaging needs.

Telemedicine tools like smartphones, two-way video, email, and wearable technology are becoming increasingly common in many healthcare settings. In 2014, HIMSS led a study that found that 46 percent of more than 400 hospitals and medical practices said they used at least one type of telemedicine. Additionally, the Academy of Integrative Health & Medicine (AIHM) found that 33 percent of U.S. healthcare practitioners offered healthcare services via telephone, video, or webcam visits, and another 29 percent planned to do so in the next few years.

Several industry analysts have forecast that 2016 will be the ‘year of action’ on many technology fronts, as several recent trends become commonplace strategies. Cloud computing, data security and mobile are tops among them. This article contains six predictions for what we can expect in 2016 on the mobile technology and cloud computing fronts.

Frank Lexa, MD, MBA, radiology residency director for Drexel University College of Medicine, calls upon radiologists to lead change “because if you let someone make changes who doesn’t understand what we do, it will be damaging to our industry and to your patients.” He advises radiologists to pick one project in one location, and demonstrate its value before spreading any alterations elsewhere.

Focusing on a patient’s satisfaction can lead to shorter perceived wait times and higher patient satisfaction, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Anna Holbrook, MD, Emory University School of Medicine, and colleagues studied questionnaires completed by 147 MR outpatients who had received care from a radiology department in which “patient experience” was a stated strategic priority. The authors found patients often believed the wait time was almost half what it actually was and were satisfied with the experience.

Diagnostic Reading #51: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

Carestream LogoIn this week’s Diagnostic Reading, we’re looking at the Meaningful Use HIT program, ultrasound mammography, redefining the role of the CISO, patient communication, and patient satisfaction.

Medical Groups Rebel Against Meaningful Use HIT Program – AuntMinnie

The American Medical Association (AMA) and 110 other medical associations have asked U.S. lawmakers to intervene in the meaningful use (MU) program before physicians decide to no longer participate in the initiative, designed to spur the adoption of healthcare IT. In a November 2 letter to leaders of the Senate and House of Representatives, the associations detailed their concerns over the administration’s plans to move ahead with implementing stage 3 of the meaningful use program, “despite the widespread failure” of stage 2.

Breast Ultrasound Mammography Find More Cancer – AuntMinnie

Adding ultrasound to mammography screening detects more early invasive breast cancer and probably reduces mortality, according to a 4 November study in the journal Lancet. The Japanese trial is thought to be the first of its kind in a large randomized multicenter population, and that focused on younger women at average risk with dense breast tissue.

Increased Cyber Risks Redefining the CISO – Healthcare IT News

Increased cyber risks and a recent string of major breaches have changed the game for chief information security officers, making cybersecurity a top priority for board members and helping CISOs more effectively make the case for bigger budgets. A recent IBM-sponsored research project performed by the Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security at Southern Methodist University in Dallas sought to explain this new shift. The results concluded there were three types of CISOs effectively innovating the way their firms handle cybersecurity.

Patients Lack Access to Digital Health Communication Tools – Healthcare Informatics

Many Americans lack access to or awareness of digital health tools, such as text appointment reminders and patient portals that can increase communication with their healthcare providers, according to a survey by The Council of Accountable Physician Practices (CAPP) and Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC). The survey also found most physicians don’t recommend using these digital tools, according to the consumer respondents. Just 29 percent receive electronic reminders for appointments, medication refills or suggested care and 14 percent report having the ability to check medications online. In addition, only 15 percent receive communication via online messaging platform and 9 percent get text reminders, and that digital interaction is growing very slowly, such as only 4 percent growth for email correspondence about patient health.

Online Review Show Technologists, Receptionists Impact Patient Satisfaction More Than Radiologists – Radiology Business

Patient reviews are becoming increasingly popular and influential throughout the healthcare industry, but that momentum doesn’t always carry over to radiologists. For example, in a study  published back in August by the Journal of the American College of Radiology,  researchers searched five popular physician-rating websites and only found reviews for 197 of 1,000 randomly selected radiologists.

What Does Clinical Collaboration Really Mean?

Carestream Clinical Collaboration PlatformWe’ve been talking about clinical collaboration and Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform quite often since before RSNA 2014.

For us, clinical collaboration was born out the use of our vendor-neutral archive (VNA). The VNA served as a housing mechanism for medical images across a variety of –ologies, not just limited to DICOM images. With the VNA, the images remain safe and accessible when necessary, however, to enable intelligent, user-based sharing, more than just storage is needed.

To go beyond the VNA and expand the capabilities that truly lay within its technology, there remained a need to bring in other systems that could result in an enterprise-wide tool to unite departments. With our own Clinical Collaboration Platform, we break down the capabilities in four areas: capture, manage, archive, and collaborate.

Capture. The goal is to provide a unified, patient-centered clinical record that pulls together images and data from departmental systems across the enterprise, and even beyond it. The solution needs to be flexible enough to be where the data acquisition happens: bed-side, by specific modalities, even from mobile devices in a wound care/urgent care environment.

Manage. From a web-based portal the user can now manage clinical imaging data whether it’s at the point of care or as part of the administrative process. Having the right clinical context to each image or clinical data ensures that information can be properly stored, viewed, and share these clinical images and accompanying data. This capability involves advanced metadata tagging, quality control to ensure consistency, and leveraging latest industry standards to ensure interoperability.

Archive. This stage involves the storage and access of clinically meaningful data throughout the enterprise, with access across each patient’s clinical history. This consolidated repository for clinical data helps to support effect collaboration via intelligent lifecycle management, optimized storage and access anytime, anywhere, standards-based and vendor-neutral, and risk-free migration from legacy archives.

Collaborate. This is the ultimate stage that supports dynamic collaboration between providers, patients, payers, administrators and IT managers, with tools and views tailored to each user’s needs. The main goal is to put patients at the center of efficient, effective healthcare. This involves EMR/EHR integration, zero-footprint interface for administrators, user-specific functionality, patient engagement, and payer reporting.

With the evolution of the VNA going beyond the simplicity of storage and access, it is clear that these new capabilities will bring out the value of allowing clinicians to collaborate with each other and take part in valuable communication with their patients. This has been the direction healthcare has been heading in for sometime, and the time is now to embrace these advancements.

You can visit our website for more information about Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform.

Cristine Kao, Healthcare IT, CarestreamCristine Kao is the global marketing director for Carestream’s Healthcare Information Solutions (HCIS) business.