Medical Imaging Technology to Support Value-Based Care

The impact of switching from fee-for-service to VBC on your enterprise imaging strategy

Thierry Verstraete, Carestream Health

The shift from fee-for-service (FFS) to value-based care (VBC) plays out in many ways throughout healthcare, including medical imaging technology. But because radiology has its own guiding principles, it is unique in its reaction to this shift.

“Imaging does not naturally fit into many of the outcomes-driven, value-based models,” said Dr. James Whitfill, addressing attendees at SIIM 2017.

Fortunately, new guidelines and technologies have emerged to help radiology support the shift to Value-Based Care.

Supporting standards for medical imaging studies

The use of standards of appropriateness for ordering imaging studies can be bolstered through decision-support systems for ordering advanced imaging studies such as CT, PET, and MRI. The systems can help weigh the risk factors involved in dose as well as the potential benefit of the study. Continue reading

Healthcare Providers Can Create 3D Anatomical Models from Radiology Images

Carestream Health integrates Materialise service that produces 3D anatomical models for medical applications

Ron Muscosky, Carestream Health

If a picture is worth a thousand words, how much is an actual physical anatomical model worth?

For some healthcare providers, the ability to see and touch a 3D visualization of pathology or a model of an organ prior to surgery could be priceless. That’s why Carestream is collaborating with Materialise NV to provide healthcare providers with a Web-based printing service to create 3D anatomical models.

AnatomyPrint ge3d anatomical modelnerates 3D anatomical models from STL files that originate with data in Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform. Materialise can use the files to generate detailed 3D printed models for healthcare providers.

“Our printing service enables healthcare providers to quickly and effortlessly send imaging data to our company, which is a premier supplier of 3D models used in medical applications,” said Brigitte de Vet, Vice President of Materialise Medical Unit. “This technology can help a clinician visualize the anatomy in 3D, which can assist in providing improved patient outcomes.” Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #9: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

This week’s articles include: the limitations and applications of mobile devices in radiology; three things CIOs can learn from radiology analytics; how vendor neutral archives can reduce duplicate imaging exams; patients increased trust in the security of EHRs; and a study on communication errors within the radiology department.Doctors in Radiology Department

Analytics can illustrate radiology’s value to the healthcare enterprise. Radiology has a meaningful contribution to make within the context of value-based care. And artificial intelligence may transform the practice of radiology in the future. CIOs also need to understand the workflow of radiologists, and varying amounts of time required to read different types of exams. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #4: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Our Diagnostic Reading Top Picks

This week’s articles describe the high priority radiologists Diagnostic Reading #5 - Radiology and Health IT Articlesplace integrating PACS with an EHR, expected growth for the global ultrasound market, patients’ desire for personalized treatment, Radiology Today’s top picks for areas within the imaging space that promise the greatest innovations and a study that indicates mentally demanding activities may play an important role in maintaining a healthy brain.

With such a wide variety of PACS and electronic health records (EHRs) in the marketplace, decision-makers at hospitals and private practices have a lot to consider when purchasing new equipment. If they want to keep their radiologists happy, they may want to make sure the PACS can be properly integrated with the EHR. According to a recent study published by the Journal of the American College of Radiology, an integrated EHR is a bigger priority to radiologists than having access to the most advanced clinical features.

The global ultrasound marke Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #3 – Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Several top news sources recently published articles that contain helpful insights for radiology and healthcare IT professionals

This diagnostic reading articles describe how the Internet and mobile technologies have led to higher patient expectations, why radiologists need to maintain good relationships with other clinicians and patients to be effective, nine trends to watch in 2016, patient opinions on acceptable ways to share their health information and the latest tactics being employed for cancer detection and treatment.Carestream Diagnostic Radiology Articles

Eight-nine percent of healthcare providers say technology has changed patient expectations, according to a recent EMC report. Respondents to the survey, which polled 236 healthcare leaders from 18 countries, said more than half of their patients wanted faster access to services. 45 percent wanted 24/7 access and connectivity and 42 percent wanted access on more devices. Another 47 percent said they wanted “personalized” experiences.

While office colleagues are integral to a radiologist’s success, they can’t be the only other players to comprise the team. To be truly effective, radiologists must cultivate and maintain open relationships with other stakeholders – referring physicians, hospitals, technologists, and, most importantly, patients.

Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #2: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

This week’s diagnostic reading articles describe the need to deploy Healthcare Vue for Radiology enterprise image viewers, growing adoption of telemedicine tools by healthcare providers, changes expected in data security, cloud and mobile technologies, why radiologists need to lead change and how patient-centric care can result in shorter perceived wait times and greater satisfaction.

Providers have more work to do to expand enterprise image viewing, which gives clinicians the ability to quickly view patient images without limitations on where they can view them, according to the results of a new HIMSS Analytics survey. The survey of 144 hospital, health system and ambulatory PACS/radiology leaders, follows a similar study conducted by HIMSS Analytics in late 2014 to gauge trends in provider adoption of enterprise image viewing. Less than half of respondents indicated that they use an enterprise image viewer to meet their diagnostic imaging needs.

Telemedicine tools like smartphones, two-way video, email, and wearable technology are becoming increasingly common in many healthcare settings. In 2014, HIMSS led a study that found that 46 percent of more than 400 hospitals and medical practices said they used at least one type of telemedicine. Additionally, the Academy of Integrative Health & Medicine (AIHM) found that 33 percent of U.S. healthcare practitioners offered healthcare services via telephone, video, or webcam visits, and another 29 percent planned to do so in the next few years.

Several industry analysts have forecast that 2016 will be the ‘year of action’ on many technology fronts, as several recent trends become commonplace strategies. Cloud computing, data security and mobile are tops among them. This article contains six predictions for what we can expect in 2016 on the mobile technology and cloud computing fronts.

Frank Lexa, MD, MBA, radiology residency director for Drexel University College of Medicine, calls upon radiologists to lead change “because if you let someone make changes who doesn’t understand what we do, it will be damaging to our industry and to your patients.” He advises radiologists to pick one project in one location, and demonstrate its value before spreading any alterations elsewhere.

Focusing on a patient’s satisfaction can lead to shorter perceived wait times and higher patient satisfaction, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Anna Holbrook, MD, Emory University School of Medicine, and colleagues studied questionnaires completed by 147 MR outpatients who had received care from a radiology department in which “patient experience” was a stated strategic priority. The authors found patients often believed the wait time was almost half what it actually was and were satisfied with the experience.

X-rays and Mom — Case Study into the State of Imaging Technology

Reposted from Imaging Technology News (ITN) with permission.

Dave Fornell, ITN

While I write a lot about medical imaging technology and how new technology can and should work, it is not often that I get to experience how things actually work in the real world. This past Thanksgiving I received a call from a paramedic explaining that my mom had fractured her leg and I should stop working on the turkey and fixings and rush to the emergency department (ED) at Edward Hospital in Naperville, Ill. She had been walking her dog on wet grass and leaves in a park when her dog took off after another dog and pulled her down. She was whipped around and the change in weight caused her to dislocate her ankle (the bottom of her shoe was facing her when she looked at her feet) and caused a spiral fracture to her fibula.

ImagingTechnologyNews December-2015 X-ray_Fractured_fibula_with_permission_of_patient_MF

A bedside screen shot of a Carestream DRX mobile X-ray in the ED of the fractured fibula.

When I got there my mom was already heavily sedated due to the pain and because the ED staff had already put her ankle back in place. The ED doctor ordered a digital radiograph (DR) of her leg to see the extent of damage. They wheeled in a new Carestream DRX mobile X-ray system and I had a live demonstration of how fast these types of systems can snap the pictures. It called up the images immediately on the machine’s screen. The image of the Pott’s fracture with fragments was really interesting as someone who covers radiology, but I also realized from a non-clinical standpoint she was really messed up and in pain. Additionally, she would need reconstructive surgery to put her Humpty Dumpty leg back together again. She was way up the creek without a paddle with it being Thanksgiving and there were no orthopedic surgeons in staff due to the holiday. The day after Thanksgiving was not much better, as we found, since most physicians were out through the following Monday. So the ER splinted the leg, wrapped it in ace bandages and sent her home with heavy pain killers.

Compounding her mobility issues was the fact that she has bilateral knee replacements. Due to the trauma, broken bone and knowing she had these implants that further limited her ability to move around, she was prescribed a prophylactic anticoagulant.

Knowing we would need the images for a surgeon to review, I had the ED burn a CD. However, I was happy to find

ITN NEWS Orthopedic_Surgery_repair_of_Broken_fibula_with_permission_of_patient_MF_0

The post-surgical X-ray showing the bone repair, which was accessed and copied by the patient using a patient portal.

Edward is among the growing number of hospitals to grant patients access to their health records via a DR Systems Internet image/results distribution system. This technology pulls images and reports from the hospitals’ Epic EMR (electronic medical record) system and makes them available for remote viewing by clinicians outside of the hospital’s picture archiving and communication system (PACS). She also was given login instructions at discharge for a patient portal so she could access her records and images herself on a home computer or smartphone.

We managed to find one orthopedic surgeon in their office on the Friday after Thanksgiving. They thought it was great that we had a CD, but before attempting to open it, they asked which hospital she had been at. Edward was already in a health information exchange, so outlying offices such as this one from a different medical group could access her records remotely in less than a minute. They were able to call up her images and see what meds she was prescribed, which made the office visit go much faster.

She had surgery on Dec. 1, the Tuesday of RSNA 2015. The orthopedic surgeon practiced at Elmhurst Hospital in Elmhurst, Ill., across the county from Naperville. But, thanks to the remote image viewing system, they could get the ED images for reference and planning. The surgeon’s post-surgery DR image showing the reconstruction of the fibula also was available via my mom’s patient portal.

She did what most patients today do with this type of access and posted her X-rays on Facebook. Leveraging the Facebook form of patient engagement, the result was lots of sympathy, flowers and friends volunteering to help her with things around the house and groceries since she cannot walk or drive for at least two months.

While an unfortunate incident and a horrible thing to have happen to my mom, from a professional standpoint, I was happy to see the technology I cover working in the real world as it was intended. The speed in workflow efficiency, speed and ease of access to her imaging at the point of care and remotely, and access to a patient portal are all examples of how the healthcare system should work. In this case, the technology and imaging integration was flawless.

David_FDave Fornell, ITN Editor

Dave Fornell is the editor of Diagnostic & Interventional Cardiology magazine and assistant editor for Imaging Technology News magazine.

 


Imaging Case Study: Carestream Mobile DRX-Revolution

 

To learn more about the CARESTREAM DRX-Revolution, click here.

Diagnostic Reading #32: Five Must-Read Articles from the Past Week

Carestream LogoAnother week, another issue of Diagnostic Reading to provide with a few articles to read in case you missed them this week. The focus of these articles is on social media to promote research, medical identity theft trends, big data and artificial intelligence, regulatory changes for medical imaging, and optimizing hospital radiology.

1) Social Media Boosts Awareness of New Research – AuntMinnie

The Journal of the American College of Radiology  released a report which found that a blog post promoted on social media generated more than 10 times the page views of research articles published online in two peer-reviewed journals.

2) Medical Identity Theft Hits All-Time High – Healthcare IT News

A majority of medical identity theft victims can expect to pay upwards of $13,500 to resolve the crime. Also, about 50% of consumers say they would find another healthcare provider if they were concerned about the security of their medical records.

3) As Big Data Grows, the Need for AI Comes into Focus – Healthcare IT News

“By 2020, there will be 200 times more data than any physician can absorb,” according to Dr. Anthony Chang, a pediatric cardiologist. “And its doubling every two years.” In a keynote address at the National Healthcare Innovation Summit, he talked about “Intelligence-as-a-Service,” a network that could make it possible for doctors to tap into knowledge from specialists anywhere when they encounter a medical situation that is not responding to treatment.

4) Ready, Set, Go: Regulatory Changes Ahead for Medical Imaging – Radiology Business Journal

“Today, regulatory changes occur all year long, and—in addition to the incredible amount of work required to manage the department, imaging center or practice—it is almost impossible to keep abreast of them. Most administrators are not prepared for all of the changes coming in the next 2 years.”

5) The Mission to Optimize Hospital Radiology – Radiology Business Journal

Radiology Business Journal spoke with radiology leaders at five different health systems to understand how they are optimizing radiology to lower costs and improve care quality. Standardizing care protocols, centralizing operations and creating physician–administrator “dyads” to drive change are key strategies.

Imaging Portals Drive Patient Engagement and Satisfaction

A survey of 1,000 U.S.-based patients revealed that 83% believed that there is value in being able to access their medical images via a secure portal.

This may not come as a huge surprise as patient portal adoption continues to grow in the U.S. and throughout the world, but medical images are often left out of the portal mix. The benefits to providing this access to patients are numerous, with the most obvious being that patients are rightfully provided with the ability to engage with their healthcare providers, effectively empowering them with control over their own care.

In the white paper embedded below that was originally hosted on Healthcare IT News, the study referenced above is explained in further detail. In addition to the 83% of patients who said they would use a patient portal to access images, 76.5% said they would recommend such a portal to their family and friends, and 79.3% said said that they would return for future imaging exams to facilities that offered such a portal.

These types of findings not only give providers an idea of how their patients want information delivered to them, but also gives an idea of how bringing medical images into the patient portal mix can provide value to the overall business with a high number of returning patients, as well as recommending such facilities that provide this offering.

To learn more about the study, you can read the embedded version below, or download Imaging Portals: Driving Patient Engagement, Improving Patient Experience and Satisfaction via the link.