Cloud Strategy: An Enterprise Imaging White Paper from Carestream and HIMSS

What is your cloud strategy for medical imaging? Two large hospitals see it differently

Joe Thornton, Carestream Health

Cloud strategies for storing and accessing medical images across the enterprise are front and center in healthcare IT these days. The increasing sophistication of imaging technology has resulted in substantial increases in imaging data.

The upside of this evolution is that clinicians have more imaging information available to aid in diagnosis and treatment. The downside is that the vast increase in imaging data is putting pressure on provider data centers everywhere.

As storage requirements increase with every new modality, the cloud is no longer an optional part of your enterprise imaging strategy. It is rapidly becoming an essential component. Our new cloud strategies white paper shares the experiences of two different imaging providers with a cloud strategy. Continue reading

Radiology Trends 2017: What’s in Store for Diagnostic Imaging?

Radiology trends for 2017 include AI, wearable technology, the internet of things, and 3D printinglooking-for-radiology-trends

Clicca qui per leggere questo blog in italiano.

Robert Dostie, Carestream Health

What can radiologists and others in the health imaging profession expect for 2017?

Hot radiology trends and topics in 2017 will reflect many of the discussions we overheard in the hallways at RSNA 2016. Technology will continue its race forward in artificial intelligence, wearables, the Internet of Things (IoT) and 3D printing. Some of these technologies are impacting radiology now. Others have gained a foothold in the medical profession and might trickle into diagnostic imaging.

“This is the most interesting time in the history of healthcare and medicine,” Zen Chu said in an interview with Medical Marketing and Media. Chu is Medical Director of Accelerated Medical Ventures and senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management. “We’ve got so many new technologies and redesigned experiences impacting both the value we deliver as well as the value patients are getting from healthcare.” Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #42: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Articles include: Dubai hospitals implement 3D printing before surgery; high-tech tracking system helps verify desired patient care activities; social media may be used to obtain patient feedback; docs vastly outperform computer algorithms in diagnostic accuracy; and a visual dashboard brings together key clinical data in ICUs.

Dubai hospitals to implement 3D printing before surgery – AuntMinnie

Soon all Dubai Health Authority hospitals in the United Arab Emirates will be able to print artificial limbs, denture molds, fracture casts, and organ models to simulate surgery before the actual procedure. The new initiative is expected to speed medical procedures, save costs, and help doctors pMedical team performing surgerylan complicated surgeries. Also 3D printing will help in providing accuracy in medical education.

Tracking technology serves many purposes in new facility – Health Data Management

A new hospital installed a high-tech tracking system that uses tags attached to clinicians and patients to monitor activity and verify that required actions are being taken. For example, if a patient is not seen by a nurse within a specific time threshold a TV screen at the nurse station notes the time lapse and the appropriate nurse is alerted. Tags on patients let personnel know where they are at all times and let family and friends track the progress of a patient in surgery via a screen in waiting rooms. This system also assists in patient flow, admission and transfer-referral procedures, as well as tracking patients who left without being seen and ED diversions. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #35: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Patient portals, teleradiology and healthIT security gaps are in the news

Articles include: use of virtual reality technology to alleviate pain; what patients want in a patient portal; many mobile devices pose security gap; the job outlook for radiologists is bright; and teleradiology is gaining acceptance as demand increases due to better technology and higher ER imaging volumes.

Hospitals Try Giving Patients a Dose of Virtual Reality – Health Data Management

It’s still a new and experimental approach, but proponents of virtual reality say that it can be an effective treatment for everything from intense pain to Alzheimer’s disease to arachnophobia to depression. The idea is that the worst pain can be alleviated by manipulating the way the human mind works: the more you focus on pain, the worse it feels. Swamp the brain with an overload of sensory inputs and a person’s consciousness of pain, anxiety or depression can be reduced. Virtual Healthcare

What keeps patients from adopting patient portals, health IT? – Health Management Technology
Despite the fact that patient portals often receive industry praise, the technology suffers from a number of user frustrations and critiques. Understanding the differences in patient portal interfaces and using pilot groups to determine which seem most navigable might help healthcare organizations avoid patient complaints about portal usability. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: September’s Image Challenge

Happy September!!

It is the beginning of the month so it’s time for a new “Guess the X-ray Challenge”! We welcome radiologists, technicians, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the August image challenge!  The correct answer was — a wire stripper!

Happy guessing and good luck!

September Image Challenge Image

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry… Carestream employees and their agencies are prohibited from answering.

Diagnostic Reading #34: Five “Must Read” Articles on Radiology and Healthcare from the Past Week

Healthcare news includes videos that improve radiologists’ ultrasound skills; and concerns about Obamacare

image of hospital patient

 

Articles include: MR-guided ultrasound helped rouse a recovering coma patient to a more alert state of consciousness; incidental and secondary findings are on the rise; use of telemedicine requires “webside” training; 10-minute videos improve pediatric radiologists’ ultrasound skills; and double-digit premium increases and exits by big-name insurers cause some to wonder if “Obamacare” will go down as a failed experiment.

MR-guided brain ultrasound helps rouse coma patient back to consciousness – Health Imaging

Neuroscience researchers and clinicians at UCLA have used MR-guided ultrasound to help rouse a recovering coma patient to a more alert state of consciousness. They’re not certain about the extent to which the novel therapy contributed to the good outcome, but they’re sufficiently hopeful to have begun recruiting participants for a larger trial.

Patient preferences should guide decisions around incidental findings – Health Imaging

Incidental and secondary findings are on the rise, thanks largely to advances in diagnostic technologies and adoptions of value-based practice incentives. As such findings increasingly confound patients as well as clinicians—not to mention medical ethicists and malpractice courts — radiology would do well to follow discussions going on in the field of genetic testing.

At the ‘webside’ – Modern Healthcare

As telemedicine takes root, there’s a growing need to train physicians on how to handle virtual visits with patients and develop a good ‘webside manner.’ Physicians must offer an empathetic and compassionate presence to calm fears and provide hope for patients who may be suffering from anything from serious to common illnesses. Medical schools have always included training in bedside manner in their curricula—now webside training might also be essential. Continue reading

Heathcare IT, Your Cloud has Arrived Courtesy of Intel (and Carestream)

Preparing for the next-generation of medical imaging data and analytics

Cristine Kao, Carestream Health

Today, the cloud is a grownup with a seat at the IT table. The major issues around the cloud (security, access and speed) have been satisfactorily resolved by industries outside of healthcare: technology, software, financial services, Cloud_imageand retail have been using the cloud for years.

Of course, healthcare does have its own unique issues of privacy, security and access that make it slow to adopt any new technology, and the cloud has been no exception. But progress has been made. In a recent annual study of 125 large and small cloud users, for the first time in 2016, security was not the first concern mentioned. Technology has jumped ahead to meet the challenges of healthcare’s journey to value.

The cloud is an essential part of the healthcare industry’s IT structure/restructure to reduce costs, increase clinical collaboration and speed up clinicians’ access to information. As larger study files boost storage requirements, Intel and Carestream have partnered in Intel’s Storage Builder Program. The purpose of the collaboration is to blend Carestream’s expertise in healthcare information systems with Intel’s technological prowess to increase the performance of Carestream’s PACS and RIS systems and to make them more useful to clinicians.  For example, Carestream recently deployed the new Intel® Solid-State Drive (SSD) Data Center (DC) Family for PCle® P3700 featuring Non-Volatile Memory Express™ (NVMe™) and observed a threefold increase in throughput in that portion of the Carestream Vue workflow.

Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #32: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology from the Past Week

In the news: medical devices might pose HIT risk; increase in radiology jobs

Articles include: medical devices offer risks for authorized access; ACR projects 16% job growth for radiologists in 2016; Stanford’s radiology department uses patient input to improve processes; FDA issued updated requirements Image of Healthcare Network Access

regarding 510(k) submissions for medical devices and software changes; and RSNA teams with The Sequoia Project to support the electronic exchange of medical images and related diagnostic reports.

Medical devices offer new risks for network access – Health Data Management

Hospitals typically have hundreds of medical devices, which represent an easy gateway for hackers. Newer medical devices might be more robust in the types and amounts of data they collect, and they might connect not only to the core network but also through Wi-Fi networks. A security consulting firm recommends healthcare facilities use “network segmentation,” so that devices are linked to a separate network.

ACR projects 16% job growth for radiologists in 2016 – Auntminnie

The number of new jobs available for radiologists in 2016 will be 16% higher than those available in 2015, according to the fifth annual workforce survey by the Commission on Human Resources at the American College of Radiology (ACR). The study was published online August 3 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #31: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology from the Past Week

Articles include: healthcare providers need multiple firewalls to protect patient data; radiologists need to establish a role on cancer treatment teams; a HIMSS/SIIM paper offers key features to consider when selecting an enterprise image viewer; 3D imaging helps diagnose 1.7-million-year-old cancer; and an Alzheimer’s vaccine could be available Image-illustrating-a-data-breachin five years.

Hack of Banner Health highlights the need for more firewalls – Health Data Management

A cyber attack at Banner Health that provided access to the information of 3.7 million individuals is a wake-up call to other provider organizations. Many hospitals only have a perimeter firewall used to provide protection for moving in and out of the core network. At Banner, the food and beverage system in the cafe that was used to ring up sales (often made with a credit or debit card) was attacked, and that opened the gate to the system’s network. This demonstrates the need for multiple firewalls across the organization. Continue reading

AHRA 2016 Keynote: The Campaign to Stop Global Whining

Image of Carestream’s Dan Monaghan

Dan Monaghan, Carestream Health, Introducing the AHRA Keynote Speaker

Erica Carnevale, Carestream Health

Before introducing the keynote speaker Monday at AHRA 2016, Carestream’s Dan Monaghan asked the radiology administrators in attendance three questions:

  1. Do you need more hours in the day?
  2. Do you wish you had more time and more energy?
  3. Could you use less stress and more fun in your life?

With hands raised and heads nodding, there was agreement that medical imaging directors are feeling the pressure of increased demands from hospital administrators, reimbursement changes and cost controls.

Speaker and author Christine Cashen took to the stage and used a mix of humor and relatable storytelling to compel AHRA attendees to change their perspectives and join her in the “Campaign to Stop Global Whining.”  Her message was simple: conflict is inevitable; different personalities require different approaches; only you can control your emotional state; and as a leader in your department, your positive energy will fuel your team’s success.

This shift in mindset can start with a few simple changes:

Continue reading