Diagnostic Reading #12: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Dose reduction and new ultrasound application make headlines

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: new technique uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs; monitoring software that can reduce dose for pediatric patients; a “digital pathologist” can improve cancer detection; variation in imaging utilization impacts practicing radiologists; and a decade of improvements in CT innovation are not reaching patients in some European countries.

Fluid in the lungs being measured by a new technique using ultrasound – Health Imaging

Medical researchers and engineers from North Carolina State University have found a new approach that uses ultrasound to measure fluid levels in the lungs. The noninvasive approach can track progress in treating pulmonary edema, which is common in patients with congestive heart failure.lung filled with fluid Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #9: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Topics presented at ECR2017 and HIMSS2017 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: how radiology departments can help ensure patient safety; why more radiologists are suffering from burnout and dissatisfaction; patients expect their physicians to be able to easily share their medical data with other providers; a progress report on data mobility and analytics; and why big data must be used in the fight against cancer.

How can radiology departments help ensure patient safety? – AuntMinnieEuropePatient safety

A presentation at ECR 2017 described potential risks from radiology procedures that include a missed abnormality due to technical issues as well as perception and communication errors.  Other errors include the wrong procedure being performed, studies performed on the wrong patient, or on the wrong side of the patient. Radiation exposure has risks including the potential for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. The presenter urged everyone working in radiology areas to act responsibility to ensure optimal patient treatment and outcomes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

News update: health IT boosts economy; radiologists get high ratings from patients

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data; radiology’s role as a value center; HIMSS survey shows health IT is boosting the U.S. economy; a report from the first HIMSS Cybersecurity Forum describes different types of attacks being launched on healthcare facilities; and patients gave high ratings to U.S. radiologists in study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data – Radiology Today

Recent advances in imaging technology deliver benefits for radiologists as well as healthcare providers and their patients. Enhanced interoperability has enabled off-site nighthawk radiology coverage.images of 24 7 clock

Also, large radiology practices can now serve rural as well as metropolitan areas—delivering access to subspecialists in all markets. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Top news: multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; and public clouds not secure

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: NIH study shows multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; cloud survey finds patient data might not be protected; what providers can learn from the hospitality industry; radiology as a business is becoming increasingly complex; and patient engagement reduces readmission from chronic conditions.

Multimedia radiology reports enhance tumor tracking – Auntminnie

Multimedia radiology reports that provide hyperlinks to annotated tumor measurements and include graphs that show treatment response can improve how these lesions are tracked over time, according to recently published research. In a retrospective study involving nearly 500 lesions, a team from NIH found that multimedia reports significantly improved concordance between Tumor Cellsradiologists and oncologists in selecting and measuring target lesions, compared with text-only radiology reports. The result is fewer discrepancies between what radiologists are measuring and what oncologists are using to evaluate how tumors are responding to therapy.

Cloud survey: quarter of healthcare organizations put patient data at risk in public cloud – Health Management Technology

A recent cloud survey analyzes healthcare organizations’ use of public cloud, the utilization of public cloud implementations, and how data is protected in these cloud environments. The survey of 51 healthcare and biotech organizations found that 25% of healthcare organizations using the public cloud do not encrypt their data. The survey also found that 63% of healthcare organizations say they intend to use multiple cloud vendors, and 38% of organizations with data in a multi-cloud environment are not using any form of encryption. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #7: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Machine learning in radiology and Federal Health Pavilion at HIMSS17 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: the HIMSS17 federal health IT solutions pavilion; first hospital in Canada to embrace medical 3D printing for surgical planningFederal Health IT Solutions Pavilion exhibit; machine learning in radiology targets efficiency; the barriers to interoperability; and radiology learns lessons from the Ebola crisis.

HIMSS17 Federal Health IT Solutions Pavilion to put population health, interoperability, and value-based care on display – Healthcare IT News

ONC, HRSA, the Defense Health Agency, and other government entities will be featured in the special Federal Health IT Solutions Pavilion exhibit on the show floor (Booth 230, Hall A). Attendees can find 22 educational sessions and other resources focusing on government initiatives to advance healthcare. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #6: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

This week’s articles include: EHRs and HIEs lacking, and post-processing in radiology

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: radiology in the era of payment reform; making the most of EHRs is easier said than done; exposing reasons for the difficulties in connecting patient information; brain MRI might help diagnose vascular cognitive disorder; and post-processing can fix problems with contrast uptake without re-imagingBusinessman Giving Money To Doctor patients.

Radiology in the era of payment reform – Diagnostic Imaging

The MACRA Act of 2015 is a quality payment program. Starting this year, there are two tracks for practices that bill Medicare patients: the advanced payment model and the merit-based incentive program. The statute recognizes two categories, patient facing and non-patient facing physicians. Many radiologists believe they are a patient-centered specialty; however there are advantages to the statute that classifies radiologists as non-patient facing. Continue reading

5 Articles on HIT and Radiology from the Past Week – Diagnostic Reading #48

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: the president of RSNA urges radiologists to expand their breadth of expertise; an RSNA16 presenter encourages radiologists to embrace evolving technology for cancer treatment; a new imaging technique could help create treatments for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases; the top three challenges for healthcare C-suite executives; and new 3D fetus modeling could help identify abnormalities.

RSNA President: Let’s get back to basics – Radiology Business

RSNA President Dr. Richard Baron’s opening address highlighted the dramatic impact of technology oDiagnostic Readingn the specialty and laid a roadmap for continuing to provide value-based care in a rapidly changing environment. He reports that physicians in other fields are becoming proficient at image interpretation, threatening the role of radiologists. He urged radiologists to focus on recapturing a breadth of expertise—learning about new diseases, drugs or surgical procedures—so they can provide additional value. Continue reading

Medical Device Decision Priorities—a Worldwide Look

Throughout the U.S. and worldwide, equipment decision criteria are not so different

There are clear advantages to having new, up-to-date medical devices; including gains in productivity and efficiency. Medical equipment can support the movement to reduce healthcare costs and increase its efficiency and effectiveness. This movement is worldwide, and nothing new, as a graphic on medical device prioritiesMcKinsey report[1] stated a few years ago. “Today, medical device companies operate in a different world. In developed countries, healthcare systems are under acute financial pressure…. Developing economies are transforming the environment, too…. Success in emerging markets requires a deep understanding of stakeholders’ needs.”

New stakeholders influence purchase decisions

And new stakeholders are changing the way organizations look at the purchase of medical equipment. “In the developed world, decisions that used to be the sole preserve of doctors are now also made by regulators, hospital administrators, and other non-clinicians…. The result of this phenomenon is a shift from individual outcomes to a focus on population-level effectiveness.” Also, big data is beginning to offer a new level of evidence-based data that helps us evaluate the true advantages of technology.

Continue reading

White Paper: Interoperability of Health Information Systems

The challenges and pathways to creating a unified framework for capturing, distributing and accessing clinical information

What is interoperability in healthcare? Interoperability can be described as a well-functioning central nervous system, coordinating the enterprise’s many roles and tasks toward a common end: the well-being of each patient.

illustration depicting connection

But when communications are slow, incomplete, or missing between any two entities — patients and providers, primary-care physicians and specialists, central and remote locations, and so on — the timeliness and quality of patient care can suffer. Many other parts of the total healthcare ecosystem can be affected as well: costs can rise, resources can be allocated inefficiently, and opportunities for constructive collaboration can be lost.

Information generated by different systems, on different networks and for different purposes becomes far more useful when a unified framework is in place for capturing, distributing and using the information. Ideally, with the appropriate security credentials, any individual user or collaborative team should be able to interact with the information they need, in the format they prefer, on their choice of device.

Why is interoperability important to healthcare?

Every stakeholder in the healthcare delivery process stands to benefit from interoperable systems built on interoperability standards that deliver collaborative transparency and efficiency. These stakeholders include patients who want to take more active responsibility for their own health; primary care physicians and specialists who are seeking meaningful collaboration, without information gaps, delays, or redundancies that could compromise quality; and providers in remote and rural areas who need the ability to share clinical images and data with centrally located specialists. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #26: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology from the Past Week

Top news includes impact of collaboration with radiologists and telemedicine

 

This week’s articles include: radiologists who collaborate with referring physicians can achieve better utilization of imaging exams; mobile devices can give patients control of their health data; VP Biden announces new data sharing initiatives to boost effectiveness in the fight against cancer; Americans are more concerned with healthcare costs than terrorist attacks; and the AMA embraces telemedicine after previously questioning its viability. telemedicine

Utilization management program points out positives of radiologist involvement

When radiologists collaborate with referring physicians to proactively manage imaging utilization, their participation has more weight tipping the scale toward success than does the specialty of the referrer. And the rad’s input has the greatest impact on primary care physicians who are heavy users of imaging exams.

‘Medicalized’ smartphones to put health data in hands of patients

The world is on the verge of a fourth industrial revolution, characterized by artificial intelligence, robots, big data and deep learning and analytics. But medicine is still stuck at the beginning of the third industrial revolution, which has already brought digital capabilities to billions of people worldwide. A Scripps Health cardiologist sees mobile devices as the technological enabler for the “democratization” of medicine by giving patients control of their own health data, which has historically been the exclusive domain of doctors. Continue reading