Diagnostic Reading #37: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

A focus on IDoR2017 and capital budget planning are in the news

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles include: emergency radiology is the focus of the upcoming International Day of Radiology; the future of radiology and artificial intelligence; a recent study of NSCLC patients with radiotherapy treatment; advice for department chairs with capital budgets; and a new scientific model for tailoring pediatric CT dosage.

International Day of Radiology  – www.ACR.org

The sixth annual International Day of Radiology (IDoR) on November 8, 2017— jointly sponsored by the American College of Radiology, the Radiological Society of North America and the European Society of Radiology—will have international activities to mark the event, with more than 100 medical societies in 57 countries. This year, IDoR will focus on emergency radiology and the essential role that radiologists play in the emergency room, increasing the quality of care and treatment of patients. November 8, 2017, marks the 122nd anniversary of the 1895 discovery of the X-ray by German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #36: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: outside forces shape HIEs and outpatient imaging centers

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles include: cinematic rendering of medical images creates lifelike images; the benefits of teaching radiology to undergraduate students; HIEs and their growing importance; children receive more CT radiation at nonpediatric hospitals; and the state of outpatient imaging and its effect on both large and smaller providers.

AJR papers shine spotlight on cinematic rendering  – AuntMinnie.com

Cinematic rendering of medical images—also called “3D on steroids”—creates strikingly lifelike images from scans. Although many in radiology aren’t sure how it works, two recent papers in the American Journal of Roentgenology offer an explanation of this new technique. These two separate research groups describe their experiences with cinematic rendering and see its promising future as an improvement over both 2D images and 3D volume rendering. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #35: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: experts pitch cloud for cyber security; patient receives 3D printed skull bone

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles in Diagnostic Reading include: machine learning and how it helps radiologists; the rise of digital breast tomosynthesis; the benefits of cloud computing in cyber security; radiology trends in 2017; and successful surgery involving a 3D skull implant.

AI will augment rather than replace radiologists: How and why – Health Imaging

Despite projections of radiology’s demise due to algorithms, a recent article suggests that not only will machine learning not take radiologists’ jobs, it will become a routine component of their clinical practice—making their work more efficient, accurate, satisfying, and valued. The authors of the article, published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, state that most algorithms now being developed or refined provide computer-assisted diagnosis and detection (CADD) of discrete radiologic findings. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #34: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Articles include ways to increase patient satisfaction; and proper positioning can reduce radiologists’ injuries

This week’s articles in our Diagnostic Reading summary include: radiologists’ views of the imaging IT market today and where it’s headed; results of a recent study exploring CT exams and meningioma; how hospital administrators can increase patient satisfaction; advice on how to reduce work-related injuries for radiographers; and how to engage employees in cybersecurity training so they will practice what they learn.

Is enterprise imaging on a slow road to mediocrity?  – AuntMinnie.com

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

The imaging IT market is in a state of uncertainty and change as it slowly travels the path toward enterprise imaging. Previously clear definitions for PACS and RIS have blurred, and healthcare providers have struggled to keep up. However, recent research on the imaging IT and archiving and management IT software market gives a look at where we’re headed. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #26: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Quidditch and patient portals are in the news

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

This week’s articles include: real and surprisingly common sports injuries from quidditch; the continued debate over mammography and possible breast cancer overdiagnoses; improving patient portals with Healthfinder.gov; radiology and the future of home reporting; and new report says healthcare continues to be the most expensive industry for data breaches.

Harry Potter is not the only injured quidditch player – AuntMinnieEurope

The Harry Potter-inspired game of quidditch results in real and surprisingly common injuries, according to researchers. At the recent U.K. Radiological Congress (UKRC), researchers recommended that quidditch players should consider wearing protective helmets and gloves. Qualitative surveys and interviews have shown head and neck injuries, as well as injured collarbones and fingers, to be among the most frequent problems. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #25: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

“Dirty data” and precision medicine make news

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

This week’s articles include: dirty data wanted for research; a blockchain distributed database might be viable for management of decentralized data; a three-modality molecular imaging system can detect certain types of atherosclerotic plaque that are more prone to rupture; technology leaders rate the state of precision medicine as a three on a scale of one to 10; and a new NIH precision medicine program wants 1 million plus participants to donate data as part of a genomics initiative.

Wanted: more data, the dirtier the better – Scientific American

Purvesh Khatri, a computational immunologist at Stanford University, has adopted a new approach to genomic discovery that calls for scouring public repositories for data collected at different hospitals on different populations with different methods. If a signal sticks around despite the heterogeneity of the samples, you can bet you’ve actually found something, according to Khatri.   Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #13: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

New this week: big growth for big data; HIT moves patient data to the cloudDiagnostic Reading: Big Data

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: expect growth for big data and analytics; researchers are learning better ways to harness the power of predictive analytics; new vaccine that doesn’t require refrigeration could save children’s lives in developing countries; facial recognition software diagnoses rare diseases; and healthcare organizations move patient data to the cloud.

Big data, analytics to see double digit revenue growth through 2020 – Health Data Management

Worldwide revenues for big data and business analytics will reach $150.8 billion in 2017, an increase of 12 percent over 2016, according to a report from IDC. And these products and services are expected to maintain a compound annual growth rate of 12 percent through 2020, when revenues will be more than $210 billion, IDC said. Healthcare is among the industries that will experience the fastest growth in spending. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #12: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Dose reduction and new ultrasound application make headlines

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: new technique uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs; monitoring software that can reduce dose for pediatric patients; a “digital pathologist” can improve cancer detection; variation in imaging utilization impacts practicing radiologists; and a decade of improvements in CT innovation are not reaching patients in some European countries.

Fluid in the lungs being measured by a new technique using ultrasound – Health Imaging

Medical researchers and engineers from North Carolina State University have found a new approach that uses ultrasound to measure fluid levels in the lungs. The noninvasive approach can track progress in treating pulmonary edema, which is common in patients with congestive heart failure.lung filled with fluid Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #9: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Topics presented at ECR2017 and HIMSS2017 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: how radiology departments can help ensure patient safety; why more radiologists are suffering from burnout and dissatisfaction; patients expect their physicians to be able to easily share their medical data with other providers; a progress report on data mobility and analytics; and why big data must be used in the fight against cancer.

How can radiology departments help ensure patient safety? – AuntMinnieEuropePatient safety

A presentation at ECR 2017 described potential risks from radiology procedures that include a missed abnormality due to technical issues as well as perception and communication errors.  Other errors include the wrong procedure being performed, studies performed on the wrong patient, or on the wrong side of the patient. Radiation exposure has risks including the potential for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. The presenter urged everyone working in radiology areas to act responsibility to ensure optimal patient treatment and outcomes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

News update: health IT boosts economy; radiologists get high ratings from patients

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data; radiology’s role as a value center; HIMSS survey shows health IT is boosting the U.S. economy; a report from the first HIMSS Cybersecurity Forum describes different types of attacks being launched on healthcare facilities; and patients gave high ratings to U.S. radiologists in study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data – Radiology Today

Recent advances in imaging technology deliver benefits for radiologists as well as healthcare providers and their patients. Enhanced interoperability has enabled off-site nighthawk radiology coverage.images of 24 7 clock

Also, large radiology practices can now serve rural as well as metropolitan areas—delivering access to subspecialists in all markets. Continue reading