Guess the X-ray: September Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Happy September!

It’s time for a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!”  We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the August image challenge!  The correct answer was — a hair dryer

Happy guessing and good luck!

Preview Carestream Health’s RSNA 2017 Exhibit!

Learn how diagnostic imaging solutions positively impact patient care

The energy behind RSNA 2017 is focused on motivating attendees to “Explore, Invent and Transform” through innovation as a means of creating positive impact on patient care.

An illustration showing that Carestream will exhibit at RSNA17

Carestream Health will exhibit at RSNA17

Our team is in synch with that goal. We are developing and deploying new technologies that address the needs of medical imaging providers in a broad range of healthcare facilities.

While attending the RSNA conference, we invite you to visit our booth (#6713) to see how we can help your organization enhance patient care by helping improve access and precision, and decreasing costs along the patient care pathway. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: August Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Happy August!

It’s August and with every new month comes a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!”  We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the July image challenge!  The correct answer was — a clock

Happy guessing and good luck!

Guess the X-ray: July Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

 

Happy July! We are at the halfway mark for 2017, and of course with every new month comes a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!”  We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the June image challenge!  The correct answer was — a calculator!

Happy guessing and good luck!

 

 

Guess the X-ray: June Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Welcome to our June “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!”  We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray.  Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the May image challenge!  The correct answer was — a gumball machine full of gumballs!

Happy guessing and good luck!

Guess the X-ray: May Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Happy May!

April showers bring May flowers – and a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!” We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to Anne O’Loughlin  who correctly guessed the April image challenge!  The correct answer was — a container of disposable cleaning wipes!

Happy guessing and good luck!

How Can You Measure Innovation in Diagnostic Imaging?

Patents and industry recognition are two ways to quantify it

Katie Kilfoyle Remis, Carestream Health

Innovation in diagnostic imaging and healthIT is continually evolving, improving their potential to help provide better patient care and at less cost.

But how can you measure innovation? Patents and industry recognition are two ways. Please indulge us while we share some of our accomplishments from 2016. And if you’d like a preview of our plans to advance imaging capture this year, read the recent blog by our president of Digital Medical Solutions, Jianqing Bennett.

Let’s start with patents. In 2016, we were awarded 43 new patents from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for innovation in radiographycone beam CT imaginghealthcare IT, and other areas. We also received 52 additional patents in European and Asian countries.

The patents earned by Carestream’s smart scientists and engineers include:

  • New medical image capture technologies related to the development of cone beam computed tomography (CT) systems designed for orthopaedic extremity imaging
  • Enhancements to our portfolio of healthcare IT systems that manage, store, and share patient data and medical imaging exams
  • Continued technology advances in our growing portfolio of radiology systems that can enhance diagnostic image quality for a wide range of healthcare providers
  • Continued advancements in laser imagers that provide affordable output of digital X-ray exams onto medical film and paper Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: December’s Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Happy December! It is time to put your thinking caps on for December’s “Guess the X-ray” Image Challenge! No one correctly guessed the November image: it was … Batman! More specifically, a Batman action figure with flexed elbow!

We welcome radiologists, technicians, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. We’ll share the answer at the end of the month.

December Image Challenge

Have fun and happy guessing!

How the Affordable Care Act Affects Diagnostic Medical Sonographers

Six years yield five significant changes in the field of sonography

Kayla Sickles, Highland Hospital

Over the last six years, healthcare in the U.S. has undergone a rapid series of changes and reforms. From the way Americans pay for care to how care is provided, the post Affordable Care ActIllustration of Affordable Care Act era of healthcare is unlike anything we have ever experienced. Diagnostic medical sonographers, also known as ultrasound technologists or ultrasound technicians, have begun to feel the effects of the Affordable Care Act on almost every aspect of their daily job duties.

More healthcare consumers

More Americans are consuming healthcare services than ever before. It is estimated that more than 20 million previously uninsured Americans gained access to health insurance through the Affordable Care Act from federal and state exchange programs, employer mandates, and/ or Medicaid expansion. Hospital and healthcare facilities are seeing more patients than ever before, which means more diagnostic tests, like ultrasounds, are being ordered. However, this sharp increase in healthcare consumption was not matched with an equal increase in human or capital healthcare resources.

Continue reading

Research: Impact of Weight-bearing Images in Orthopaedic Imaging

Study favors weight-bearing images for orthopaedic patellofemoral diagnosis and surgery

Dr. John Marzo, UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine

In clinical orthopedics advanced imaging like computed axial tomography (CT) scanning, has become invaluable to the evaluation and management of patients with musculoskeletal disease. Bone detail is much better visualized with 2D and 3D CT renderings of patients with problems like glenoid fracture, failed shoulder instability surgery, and meniscal root avulsions.

Conventional CT technology requires subject in supine position

High-quality images provide multiplanar 2D and 3D visualization for practitioners who think and work in three dimensions. However, a significant limitation of CT technology has been that it forces image acquisition with the subject in a supine, relaxed position. When imaging an injured knee, for example, the leg is in full extension and the muscles relaxed.

The conventional measures of patellofemoral alignment include the congruence angle, patellar tilt angle, and tibial tubercletrochlear groove offset distance. There are clearly defined limits of normal use for each of these measures, and they are used by surgeons to plan corrective operations on the patellofemoral joint. The degree of knee flexion and activity of the quadriceps are known to influence patellar tracking on the trochlea, but these factors are removed when images are taken with the patient supine.

Some have tried to simulate weight bearing in a CT scanner by custom designing a rig to apply longitudinal  load  through  the  patient  for  imaging  of  the  spine or  lower  extremity. These  methods  are  at worst,  a  poor depiction  of  functional  anatomy;  and  at  best , a cumbersome  and a less-than-accurate simulation of function.

Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo undertake study

Myself and other researchers from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo are currently performing research on a new  cone  beam CT scanner,  the  CARESTREAM OnSight  3D  Extremity  System,  developed by Carestream Health. The system is designed to offer high-quality, portable,  low-dose  3D  point-of­ care imaging by orthopaedic and sports medicine practices, hospitals, imaging centers, urgent care facilities, and other healthcare providers.

We have been performing institutional IRB-approved clinical trials and basic sciences studies with the prototype model. These studies are being carried out at the Erie County Medical Center, Buffalo’s regional orthopedic tertiary care facility. Based on early data, we are convinced that many imaging studies should be acquired with subjects in positions that represent true human function, such as weight bearing on the lower extremities.

Comparing Carestream OnSight 3D Extremity System to predicate devices

We compared the 2D imaging performance of the CARESTREAM OnSight 3D  Extremity System to the predicate CARESTREAM DRX-1 Detector used with the CARESTREAM DRX-Evolution System. We compared the 3D volumetric imaging performance of the OnSight system to a multiple detector computed  tomography (MDCT) scanner  (“predicate device”). The purpose of the study was to demonstrate equivalent diagnostic  image quality between the investigational and predicate devices, using a Radlex subjective quality rating scale.

The evaluation was performed on equal numbers of knees, ankles, feet, elbows, and hands from 33 cadaveric human specimens and 13 living human subjects. Four independent, board-certified radiologists of varying general reading experience performed evaluations of the images/exams captured using both the investigational and predicate devices.

Results: OnSight 3D Extremity System produced 2D images with equivalent diagnostic image quality to predicate system

In summary, the CBCT system produced 2D images with equivalent diagnostic image quality to the predicate system for a range of exams, and 3D images were rated equal or better when compared to the predicate device for a range of exams on cadaveric specimens and human subjects.

  • More than 80% of all the 2D images were rated diagnostic or exemplary, whereas approximately 98% of all 3D images were rated diagnostic or exemplary.
  • More than 75% of all Radlex rating responses counted for all 2D images were rated equivalent or favored the investigational device.
  • Approximately 85% of the Radlex rating responses counted for the 3D images were rated equivalent or favored the investigational device.

Examples of representative scans are seen below.

2D and 3D orthopaedic renderings generated by the CBCT scanner

Figure 5: 2D and 3D renderings generated by the CBCT scanner

Our conclusion from this study is that for cases of patella instability, it may be desirable to obtain images while the patient is weight bearing on a flexed knee with their quadriceps muscles active. Improvement in objective measures of patella alignment should lead to improved clinical and surgical care of patients with this condition.

New study: comparing measures of ankle stability

A second clinical study is currently under way to take advantage of the unit’s ability to obtain images in weight bearing. The research will compare measures of ankle stability from the investigational weight-bearing cone beam computed tomography scanner to the same measures on gravity stress X-ray in patients who have supination-external rotation ankle fractures.

These and future studies may validate the value of the OnSight 3D Extremity System. Potential benefits include better quality images with a lower radiation dose than conventional computed tomography. The unit is proposed for use in orthopedic offices, but it might have applications to the operating room or at athletic competition sites. The unit is less expensive than a traditional in-hospital or radiology center CT scanner, and can be used with existing electrical systems (220V). Most important however, is the potential to acquire images while bearing weight and in more functionally relevant positions.

Editor’s note: The CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System received FDA 510(k) clearance in September 2016 and is available for order in the United States.

Dr. John Marzo, UBMD

Dr. John Marzo is a physician with UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, Associate Professor of Clinical Orthopaedics, Jacobs School  of  Medicine  and  Biomedical  Sciences,  University at Buffalo and  former  Medical  Director,  Buffalo Bills. He is also a member of Carestream’s Advisory Group, a collective of medical professionals that advises the company on healthcare IT trends.