Access to radiology reports can help eliminate barriers and enable collaboration

Close-up of surgeons hands holding surgical scissors

The number of new innovations in health IT can be overwhelming. Hospital CIOs and administrators must help evaluate new software for referral management, applications for improved transparency, and analytics software. How can HIT directors and hospital administrators decide which technologies are worth investing in? Answer: start with the ones – like cloud hosted PACS solutions – that solve a real problem – like radiology staffing shortages.

Nicola Strickland, head of the Royal College of Radiologists, made a convincing case to The Observer in 2016 for “how the crisis in radiology recruitment will break the entire NHS system in Britain”. And in January 2017, AuntMinnie Europe painted a dire picture of how a hard Brexit would further strain the lack of radiology resources.

Other parts of Europe, especially rural areas, face a similar problem. The shortage of radiologists and other health professionals is driving medical providers with no formal or previous affiliations to find ways to pool their resources and collaborate among their sites.

Fortunately, cloud based services and teleradiology are toppling the geographic barriers. An increasing number of medical health providers in Europe are installing PACS – Picture Archiving and Communication Systems – and hosting them in the cloud. For example, Spire Healthcare, one of the largest private healthcare groups in the UK, enabled cross site reporting using the Carestream cloud. Using different cloud services from Carestream, Spire Healthcare can store and archive data to enable cross site reporting and then distribution of the reports and associated images.

Preparing for the next-generation of medical imaging data and analytics

Today, the cloud is a grownup with a seat at the IT table. The major issues around the cloud (security, access and speed) have been satisfactorily resolved by industries outside of healthcare: technology, software, financial services, Cloud_imageand retail have been using the cloud for years.

Of course, healthcare does have its own unique issues of privacy, security and access that make it slow to adopt any new technology, and the cloud has been no exception. But progress has been made. In a recent annual study of 125 large and small cloud users, for the first time in 2016, security was not the first concern mentioned. Technology has jumped ahead to meet the challenges of healthcare’s journey to value.

The cloud is an essential part of the healthcare industry’s IT structure/restructure to reduce costs, increase clinical collaboration and speed up clinicians’ access to information. As larger study files boost storage requirements, Intel and Carestream have partnered in Intel’s Storage Builder Program. The purpose of the collaboration is to blend Carestream’s expertise in healthcare information systems with Intel’s technological prowess to increase the performance of Carestream’s PACS and RIS systems and to make them more useful to clinicians.  For example, Carestream recently deployed the new Intel® Solid-State Drive (SSD) Data Center (DC) Family for PCle® P3700 featuring Non-Volatile Memory Express™ (NVMe™) and observed a threefold increase in throughput in that portion of the Carestream Vue workflow.

CIOs Need to Embrace Changing Technologies, Expectations

Smart wristwatch

The New Year is upon us, which means it’s time to predict what’s to come for the world of healthcare information technology (IT) in 2016. The latest research from Forrester confirms what we already know to be true: healthcare CIOs will need to embrace changing expectations and technologies in 2016.

The predicted changes on the horizon bring both opportunities and challenges for healthcare CIOs. One thing is certain: CIOs will face increased demands for improved business technology (BT) plans in 2016.

In our recent blog series, “Whirlwinds of Change,” we dove into specific healthcare trends for 2016, including everything from sophisticated imaging in the NFL to the value in refurbished IT equipment. In this blog, we look at 2016 predictions in a new light. Forrester research has done a great job in predicting key changes on the horizon for healthcare IT leaders and how those leaders will need to adapt. From that, we’ve pulled out what we believe to be the top challenges CIOs can expect to face this year.

IDC Shares its Latest HealthIT Predictions for 2016

Man checking his laptop with a stethoscope

A new year brings many changes—green grass turns to white snow, people announce their New Year’s resolutions, and in 2016, cyberattacks are expected to increase in intensity and volume. In fact, it’s likely that cyberattacks will compromise 1-in-3 healthcare records in the coming calendar year, according to research from IDC.

Change is inevitable, but it’s a huge advantage to be able to see what’s coming and prepare for it. International Data Corporation (IDC) released its latest healthcare IT predictions for 2016, including startling statistics about the growth of IT spending and increased emphasis on cyber security due to breaches. IDC identified its “Top 10” predictions for the year; the question now is what they mean to the average healthcare CIO.

These are our key takeaways from IDC’s 2016 predictions:

  • Attacks are on the rise. In fact, IDC research predicts that one out of three individuals will have his or her healthcare records compromised by cyberattacks in 2016. Coming off the heels of the