White Paper: What to Look for in an Enterprise Image Viewer

Enterprise image viewers aren’t all equal; get the guide

Joe Thornton, Carestream Health

An enterprise image viewer is your organization’s connection among stakeholders, linking radiologists with referring physicians, patients with doctors, and clinicians at home with specialists across the country.

It’s understood that the most crucial aspect of every radiology diagnostic report is the image. Yet referring physicians and other clinicians typically see only words—the written reports and conclusions dictated by radiologists.doctor looking at images on tablet

An enterprise image viewer – also known as an universal image viewer – bridges the gap, displaying images of many types—not just DICOM—and other clinical data such as JPEG photos, videos, ECGs, and scanned PDF clinical documents.  A new white paper, “Enterprise Access Viewer”, explores and explains the requirements for an effective universal image viewer.

Enterprise image viewer – easy access helps minimize cost and dose Continue reading

Radiology Trends 2017: What’s in Store for Diagnostic Imaging?

Radiology trends for 2017 include AI, wearable technology, the internet of things, and 3D printinglooking-for-radiology-trends

Clicca qui per leggere questo blog in italiano.

Robert Dostie, Carestream Health

What can radiologists and others in the health imaging profession expect for 2017?

Hot radiology trends and topics in 2017 will reflect many of the discussions we overheard in the hallways at RSNA 2016. Technology will continue its race forward in artificial intelligence, wearables, the Internet of Things (IoT) and 3D printing. Some of these technologies are impacting radiology now. Others have gained a foothold in the medical profession and might trickle into diagnostic imaging.

“This is the most interesting time in the history of healthcare and medicine,” Zen Chu said in an interview with Medical Marketing and Media. Chu is Medical Director of Accelerated Medical Ventures and senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management. “We’ve got so many new technologies and redesigned experiences impacting both the value we deliver as well as the value patients are getting from healthcare.” Continue reading

Healthcare Providers Can Create 3D Anatomical Models from Radiology Images

Carestream Health integrates Materialise service that produces 3D anatomical models for medical applications

Ron Muscosky, Carestream Health

If a picture is worth a thousand words, how much is an actual physical anatomical model worth?

For some healthcare providers, the ability to see and touch a 3D visualization of pathology or a model of an organ prior to surgery could be priceless. That’s why Carestream is collaborating with Materialise NV to provide healthcare providers with a Web-based printing service to create 3D anatomical models.

AnatomyPrint ge3d anatomical modelnerates 3D anatomical models from STL files that originate with data in Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform. Materialise can use the files to generate detailed 3D printed models for healthcare providers.

“Our printing service enables healthcare providers to quickly and effortlessly send imaging data to our company, which is a premier supplier of 3D models used in medical applications,” said Brigitte de Vet, Vice President of Materialise Medical Unit. “This technology can help a clinician visualize the anatomy in 3D, which can assist in providing improved patient outcomes.” Continue reading

Heathcare IT, Your Cloud has Arrived Courtesy of Intel (and Carestream)

Preparing for the next-generation of medical imaging data and analytics

Cristine Kao, Carestream Health

Today, the cloud is a grownup with a seat at the IT table. The major issues around the cloud (security, access and speed) have been satisfactorily resolved by industries outside of healthcare: technology, software, financial services, Cloud_imageand retail have been using the cloud for years.

Of course, healthcare does have its own unique issues of privacy, security and access that make it slow to adopt any new technology, and the cloud has been no exception. But progress has been made. In a recent annual study of 125 large and small cloud users, for the first time in 2016, security was not the first concern mentioned. Technology has jumped ahead to meet the challenges of healthcare’s journey to value.

The cloud is an essential part of the healthcare industry’s IT structure/restructure to reduce costs, increase clinical collaboration and speed up clinicians’ access to information. As larger study files boost storage requirements, Intel and Carestream have partnered in Intel’s Storage Builder Program. The purpose of the collaboration is to blend Carestream’s expertise in healthcare information systems with Intel’s technological prowess to increase the performance of Carestream’s PACS and RIS systems and to make them more useful to clinicians.  For example, Carestream recently deployed the new Intel® Solid-State Drive (SSD) Data Center (DC) Family for PCle® P3700 featuring Non-Volatile Memory Express™ (NVMe™) and observed a threefold increase in throughput in that portion of the Carestream Vue workflow.

Continue reading

Guess the X-ray – December’s Image Challenge

To end 2015 on a high note we’re offering up another round of our radiology image contest, and in the holiday spirit we’re including 2 images this time!

We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess either subject in this educational X-ray quiz. Please leave your answer in the comment section below.

December_image_challenge_2015

Sorry Carestream employees – please sit this one out.

Diagnostic Reading #7: 10 Most Popular Blog Posts from the Second Half of 2014

CARESTREAM Touch Ultrasound System - 1Carestream has worked hard to provide content of value throughout 2014. We have used our blog to deliver information about Carestream technology, address major industry trends, and inform readers about the medical imaging and IT fields. In this edition of Diagnostic Reading, we look at our most read blog posts since July. The topics include, the recent unveiling of our newest technology, industry infographics, image quality, digital 3D mammography, and dose reduction.

1) A LOOK AT THE NEW CARESTREAM TOUCH ULTRASOUND SYSTEM

Carestream unveiled its newest technology in Chicago at RSNA 2014. The CARESTREAM Touch Ultrasound System officially moved the company into the ultrasound market. This post contains information about the new technology, including images that explain its features and capabilities.

2) INFOGRAPHIC: THE EVOLUTION OF RADIOLOGY REPORTING

This infographic follows radiology reporting throughout history. It covers traditional hand written reports, transcribed reports, and voice recognition. Pros and cons of these types of report are listed. Ultimately, the evolution brings us to multimedia reporting and highlights its benefits.

3) UNCOMPROMISED QUALITY: BONE SUPPRESSION AND CHEST X-RAY IMAGES

Since being FDA approved earlier this year, radiologists are 58% more confident in their ability to read chest x-rays with bone suppression software. Since the software produces 2-D images rather than 3-D images, it also reduces the typical dose for patients receiving chest x-rays.

4) DREAM JOB: APPLICATIONS ENGINEER, DIGITAL MEDICAL SOLUTIONS

This Q & A with Marty Pesce asks questions about his experiences as an applications engineer for Carestream. The interview discusses the nature of a job as a radiologic technologist. Pesce also had the opportunity to answer questions about his personal experiences in the radiology field.

5) IMPLEMENTING EFFECTIVE WAYS TO REDUCE AND TRACK RADIATION DOSE FOR X-RAY EXAMS

El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, California, has taken measures to dramatically track and decrease patient dose. The hospital attributes this success to their transition from CR to DR technology. It claims that better imaging software leads to less repeated imaging.

6) DIGITAL BREAST TOMOSYNTHESIS NECESSARY FOR IMAGING DENSE BREAST TISSUE

This post emphasizes the importance of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography for women with dense breast tissue. Numerous studies are noted by the author, including a JAMA study that found that by using DBT, there was a 41% increase in the detection of possibly lethal cancers.

7) RADIOLOGY’S RESPONSE TO HEALTHCARE CONSOLIDATION – STEP ONE: THE GLOBAL WORKLIST

With hospital mergers becoming prevalent, this post suggests that interoperability will continue to be a challenge. The adoption of software such as CARESTREAM Vue Connect could ease the transition. Combining data allows for both institutions to access their own information, as well as having access to new patient information.

8) THE ROLE OF A FULLY INTEGRATED RIS-PACS: DREAM OR REALITY?

Seventy-eight percent of office based physicians use some sort of electronic health record system (EHR). This post addresses the possibility of  radiologists and physicians working together using RIS and PACS to document patient records. There are inevitable challenges, but ideally this could mean “one patient, one record.”

9) RADIOLOGY AND MACRO HEALTHCARE TRENDS PART II: COST

In a time when Americans find it difficult to afford medical bills, radiologists must be conscientious about cost. Inappropriate imaging exams and lack of quality drive up costs, this post discusses how imaging appropriateness and effective reading of images can reduce costs in the field of radiology. Additionally, the post addresses other ways that health IT can help lower imaging costs.

10) THE THREE-PHASE PROCESS TO IMPLEMENT A PACS-DRIVEN TELERADIOLOGY SERVICE

Innovative Radiology adopted CARESTREAM Vue Motion. Since the implementation, efficiency has been higher. Additionally, Vue Motion connected Innovative Radiology with more than 40 sites in early 2014.

Challenges to RIS+PACS Integration

Makori Arnon, Clalit Health Services

Makori Arnon, MD, MHA, Director of Imaging Informatics, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel

The world of radiology sees frequent use of the term “integration,” but this term can easily mean many things to different people. When used in conjunction with describing implementation of a RIS+PACS platform at a hospital, it demands we clearly define our expectations up front to minimize the challenges and disruption that can accompany integrating a new RIS+PACS platform into our workflow.

In the current environment we see that RIS, PACS and capture modalities are separate yet complementary entities that are really more bundled than they are integrated. We all know that RIS is a separate platform that is slowly being absorbed into the PACS or into EMR. PACS joins together both clinical information systems with the organization’s IT network and a successful implementation should have a very positive impact upon workflow.

Radiologists need to read images and dictate their findings, and being able to easily integrate images directly into the report via the RIS will help improve workflow. Integrating images into a RIS means that vendors will need to put more emphasis on developing improved RIS technology to provide higher-end throughput. By improving the RIS interface to better address workflow issues, a single-platform vendor will have a big advantage over another third party.

Carestream Radiology Information System

Integrating images into a RIS means that vendors will need to put more emphasis on developing improved RIS technology to provide higher-end throughput.

In the contemporary radiology department, knowledge is everything. This knowledge goes outside the walls of the healthcare facility with the advent of patient portals that allow patients to electronically access, store and share their medical images. With a well-integrated RIS+PACS platform, radiology professionals expect amplified clinical, business and IT benefits that include:

  • Greater value and insight resulting from the generation of clinically-rich reports
  • Improved workflow
  • Greater cost control and a streamlined data flow
  • Increased patient engagement and satisfaction with an intuitive patient portal; and
  • The ability to foster clinical collaboration without boundaries.

To achieve this, we need to improve upon the current integration process by providing a system or single platform for the reading and distribution workflow. Successful RIS+PACS vendors are making this a key focus of future product development activities.

Another issue to consider is that radiologists continue to change how they work. We are now seeing more “point of care” imaging where you have physicians creating medical images by capturing images with handheld ultrasound or endoscopy units. These physicians (not radiologists) are creating a workflow that is “orderless” or “non-scheduled”—and the organization will need to accommodate this workflow by supporting the input of these images into the PACS. Point-of care imaging is an integration point that we will need to see in future development efforts since it is clearly on the rise.

How is your organization handling the integration of RIS+PACS?

What will your RIS+PACS platform look like in the next 10 years?

Makori Arnon, MD, MHA, is the Director of Imaging Informatics at Clalit Health Services in Tel Aviv, Israel. He is also a member of Carestream’s Advisory Group, a collective of medical professionals that advises the company on healthcare IT trends.

The Top 10 Reasons for Veterinarians to go Digital

Heidi McIntosh, Marketing Manager, X-ray Solutions, Carestream

Heidi McIntosh, Marketing Manager, X-ray Solutions, Carestream

Radiography is a jargon-heavy environment filled with terms and acronyms that can be hard for anyone to follow. The last thing you want to worry about is being confused while taking care of your patients. There is no doubt that technology is changing the way we work and many facilities are upgrading from film-based radiography to digital, but some are still on the fence.

A veterinary practice on the coast of Southern England recently showcased the advanced medical care now available for beloved pets and their owners. Raddenstiles Veterinary Surgery upgraded to digital to deliver access and management of high-quality imaging studies for the 3,500 patients the practice sees each month. Going digital has enabled the practice to engage in remote consultations to better treat their patients.

In a recent case, a Jack Russell Terrier fell off a 150-foot seaside cliff and was rescued by the Coast Guard. The veterinarian at the local practice determined the dog had a broken hip and digitally transmitted the images to the on-call vet at the Raddenstiles practice. There, they were able to devise a treatment plan and successfully repair the injury once the dog was stable and fit for surgery.

An Inside Look: A magazine for veterinarians from Carestream about radiology trends.

V-Inside: A magazine from Carestream about veterinary radiology trends.

There are many benefits that come from making the move to digital from both a business and patient-care perspective. Here are 10 of the best ones:

  1. Speed: Imaging exams are faster and smoother than ever before. X-ray images are displayed almost instantly, enabling veterinarians to accept or retake an image if needed, adding up to faster diagnosis and early treatment.
  2. Quality: Digital imaging provides superb quality, which can mean a higher level of confidence in the diagnoses and potentially, an increased standard of care.
  3. Waste: No more film, storage, toxic chemicals, fumes/odors, or long processing times.
  4. Versatility: Flexible and versatile software enables veterinarians to capture both soft tissue and bone detail in the same image, eliminating the need for multiple exposures with film cassettes.
  5. Sharing: Digital imaging supports increased clinical collaboration because images can be quickly and easily shared electronically.
  6. Application: Digitally captured exam images can be enhanced and manipulated to aid in interpretation.
  7. Space: Save valuable floor space since there is no need for a dedicated darkroom or storage for files because all images can be archived digitally.   
  8. Savings: Advancing technology is making the initial cost of digital systems even more affordable. Over time practices can enjoy a lower cost of ownership and operation.
  9. Transition: The transition is smooth and easy with little to no disruption. Digital imaging fits into existing workflow with an easy-to-use interface, minimizing training time.
  10.  Intuitive: This state-of-the-art technology can differentiate practices from the competition and enhance professional image.

The latest edition of An Inside Look magazine further discusses how Raddenstiles Veterinary Surgery benefits from going digital, along with “RAD 101: Know Your Modalities,” and a closer look at the TDR Detector. You can read the latest edition of the magazine here and subscribe to never miss a new version here.

How can going digital help your veterinary clinic be at its very best?

A Mobile Imaging Efficiency Showdown: CR vs. DR

When it comes to medical imaging it is no secret that every second counts. The modern healthcare environment can be incredibly fast-paced and medical imaging professionals demand, and deserve, the best when it comes to time-saving technologies.

We wanted to compare the efficiency of DR compared to CR using the DRX-1, and with the support of Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK we were able to record a speed test. In the video, wireless DR is almost twice as fast as standard CR mobile imaging–an impressive performance that could make a big difference in terms of productivity and patient care.

The Top 5 Everything Rad Posts From the First Half of 2014

top 5The first six months of 2014 have proven to be quite eventful for all of us in the world of medical imaging and healthcare IT. As we look forward to the second half of the year, we wanted to take a look back at the five most popular posts of the first half of 2014.

1) Five Ideas the Medical Imaging World will be Implementing in 2014

This post gives a preview of the five big trends that we thought would affect the medical imaging world in 2014.

2) Preparation and Support is Key to Safe Imaging with Pediatric Patients

There are many components of medical imaging that can intimidate or scare children. Learn about how hospitals employ child life specialists to support children and their families before, during, and after their radiology appointment.

3) ACR on CNBSS Mammography Study: “Deeply Flawed and Widely Discredited”

This post highlights the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) response to a study which claimed that mammograms offered no advantage in detecting breast cancers that were too small to feel. The ACR found many serious design flaws in the study, and found no reason to dismiss the importance of mammograms.

4) Q&A: Digital Breast Tomosynthesys

Ron Muscosky, Worldwide Product Line Manager, HCIS provides answers to some of the common questions health care organizations are asking about Digital Breast Tomosynthesys.

5) [Whitepaper] How can Bone Suppression Improve Chest Radiographic Images?

This whitepaper takes an in depth look at Carestream’s bone suppression software, which helps radiologists interpret chest images by removing the ribs and clavicle from x-rays.