Weight-bearing images show pathologies more clearly

Musculoskeletal and orthopaedic disorders are without prejudice. They plague the sports professional, the weekend athlete and even sedentary office workers.

According to the United States Bone and Joint Initiative, 77% (65.8 million) of all injury health care visits are for musculoskeletal injuries. And OSHA estimates that work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the United States account for over 600,000 injuries and illnesses. The injuries can cause pain, limit activities and require surgical repair and/or physical therapy.

Imaging the extent of these injuries, ranging from carpal tunnel to meniscus loss, has been challenging. The reason: traditional computed tomography (CT) has a significant limitation. It requires multiple rotations –and it cannot capture a weight-bearinCarestream OnSight 3D Extremity Systemg image. However, new cone beam CT (CBCT) technology from Carestream removes these restrictions. The CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System, designed to offer high-quality, low-dose 3D point-of-care imaging  by orthopedic and sports medicine practices, hospitals, imaging centers, urgent care facilities and other healthcare providers.CBCT, first described in the late 1970s, is a variant of traditional computed tomography. The main difference between the two approaches is the volume of the object that is imaged at one time. In traditional CT, a narrow slice of the patient is imaged with a “fan beam” of X-rays. For an extended volume of the anatomy via CT, the patient must be imaged multiple times through the fan of X-rays as it rotates. In contrast, in CBCT, a large-area detector images an extended volume of the patient in a single rotation, reducing the complexity of the mechanical design of the system.