El Detector DRX-1 de CARESTREAM y Clinica Mobile ofrecen a los pilotos de MotoGP y WSBK rápidos resultados diagnósticos. Leggi questo blog in Italiano   Read this blog in English Cuando se corre alrededor de una pista de MotoGP o World Superbike a casi 200 mph, las lesiones

Providers must be accredited by a CMS-approved organization. The process for securing accreditation for Cone Beam CT orthopaedic imaging can be a bit confusing. However, it’s a necessary process. Any facility performing CT scans must obtain accreditation prior to receiving reimbursements from Medicare and many private

Aunt Minnie Selects OnSight Product as Finalist for “Best New Radiology Device” Editor's note: the CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System was named the winner for Best New Radiology Device by Aunt Minnie in October! September has been a big month for our CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System. The product

Study favors weight-bearing images for orthopaedic patellofemoral diagnosis and surgery Dr. John Marzo  UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine In clinical orthopedics advanced imaging like computed axial tomography (CT) scanning, has become invaluable to the evaluation and management of patients with musculoskeletal disease. Bone detail is much better

Health imaging, contact sports and patient engagement are in the spotlight

This week’s articles include: a radiologist spearheads improvements at a Texas hospital; measurable changes can occur inside young athletes’ brains in a single season of contact sports; patient engagement is becoming essential to getting maximum payment for services; a study reports that one-third of radiology recommendations went unacknowledged at a Boston facility; and admissions growth for U.S. hospitals is unlikely to be repeated in 2016.

How radiologists can lead the way in healthcare quality improvement – Health Imaging

When quality improvement efforts at the Baylor College of Medicine stalled out due to multiple staffing disruptions and a general lack of coordination, it was a radiologist who took the challenge head-on, according to Emily Sedgwick, MD, an assistant professor and author of a recent article in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Changes to brain cells measurable after one season of high school football – Health Imaging Carestream-head-trauma

A single season spent playing contact sports is all it takes for measurable changes to occur inside young athletes’ brains, according to results of a study recently published in the Journal of Neurotrauma. Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas used helmets capable of recording data related to head impacts, then used MRI and diffusional kurtosis imaging to measure changes in neural cellular structures. They found that even when no concussion occurs, athletes experience neurological changes at the cellular level after just one season.

Weight-bearing images show pathologies more clearly

Musculoskeletal and orthopaedic disorders are without prejudice. They plague the sports professional, the weekend athlete and even sedentary office workers.

According to the United States Bone and Joint Initiative, 77% (65.8 million) of all injury health care visits are for musculoskeletal injuries. And OSHA estimates that work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the United States account for over 600,000 injuries and illnesses. The injuries can cause pain, limit activities and require surgical repair and/or physical therapy.

Imaging the extent of these injuries, ranging from carpal tunnel to meniscus loss, has been challenging. The reason: traditional computed tomography (CT) has a significant limitation. It requires multiple rotations –and it cannot capture a weight-bearinCarestream OnSight 3D Extremity Systemg image. However, new cone beam CT (CBCT) technology from Carestream removes these restrictions. The CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System, designed to offer high-quality, low-dose 3D point-of-care imaging  by orthopedic and sports medicine practices, hospitals, imaging centers, urgent care facilities and other healthcare providers.CBCT, first described in the late 1970s, is a variant of traditional computed tomography. The main difference between the two approaches is the volume of the object that is imaged at one time. In traditional CT, a narrow slice of the patient is imaged with a “fan beam” of X-rays. For an extended volume of the anatomy via CT, the patient must be imaged multiple times through the fan of X-rays as it rotates. In contrast, in CBCT, a large-area detector images an extended volume of the patient in a single rotation, reducing the complexity of the mechanical design of the system.

Unstructured data and radiologists’ adoption of technology are in the news

 

This week’s articles on #healthcare data and #radiology include: more than 40% of retired #NFL players might have traumatic brain injuries; 80% of big health data is unstructured and “invisible” to healthcare organizations; scientists are gaining unprecedented tools for understanding the genetic roots of cancer; engaging radiologists is key to a successful standardized structured reporting program; and efforts are underway to make customer relationship management a central component in the population health ecosystem.

Imaging study: More than 40% of retired NFL players may have traumatic brain injuries – HealthBrain injuries Imaging

Nearly half of retired National Football League players might suffer from traumatic brain injuries, according to re
sults of a diffusion tensor imaging study scheduled to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Vancouver, Canada.

Providers need new tools to make sense of unstructured data – Health Data Management

Healthcare is being inundated with a deluge of big health data, 80 percent of which are invisible to current computing systems because the data are unstructured, according to IBM. Unstructured data includes doctors’ notes, wearables, X-rays, social media, the weather, sensors and sound.