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Improving radiology reports and leveraging IT to improve efficiency are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: benefits of actionable reports; how to leverage IT resources to improve efficiency and quality; four strategies to improve radiology reports; healthcare providers experience challenges in transitioning to value-based care; and Asia is poised to replace Europe as second largest healthcare market by 2025.

RSNA 2016: Actionable reports can save money, patient anxiety – Radiology Businessmoney in a wastebasket

According to the Institute of Medicine, between $800 billion and $1 trillion is wasted by the U.S. healthcare system every year. And imaging plays a role in this costly cycle. Unactionable language in a radiology report can create unneeded exams—and radiology reports often contain vague wording. Aggregating usable data, clinical history, and relevant documents into a report can aid the referring physician in reaching a conclusion and delivers the best value to patients. Using standardized language and pre-populated text is important.

RSNA 2016: How to improve quality by leveraging your IT department – Radiology Business

A medical director of enterprise imaging urged increased use of IT resources to improve efficiency and quality. He tapped the IT staff to extract all relevant information about a patient from the EMR and automatically give it to radiologists as they place orders. He also eliminated the need for technologists to enter imaging protocols into equipment before each exam. The IT staff also implemented a system that allows radiologists to send short message services or text messages to other physicians—and when those messages are ignored, an alarm goes off until they are acknowledged.  

An interview with Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí of the Royal Academy of Medicine; Part 1

Haga clic aquí para leer esta entrevista en español.

Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí has held chair number 13 of the Royal Academy of Medicine since last Image of the frontal cortex depicting quantitative radiologyFebruary. In his inaugural speech as a scholar at this prestigious institution, Dr. Martí-Bonmatí made references to quantitative radiology and imaging biomarkers.

Recently, he explored the topics further in an interview with Everything Rad. This is the first of a two-part conversation with Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí.

una entrevista con Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí de la Real Academia Nacional de Medicina

This Spanish language blog is also available in English.

Una entrevista con Dr. Luis Martí-Bonmatí de la Real Academia Nacional de MedicinaImage of the frontal cortex

El Dr. Luís Martí-Bonmatí ocupa desde el pasado mes de febrero el Sillón número 13  de la Real Academia Nacional de Medicina. En su discurso de ingreso como académico a esta prestigiosa institución, el Dr. Martí-Bonmatí hace especial referencia a la radiología cuantitativa y a los biomarcadores de imagen.

En esta primera parte de una entrevista concedida a Everything Rad (ER), el Dr. Martí-Bonmatí profundiza en el papel de la radiografía cuantitativa y los biomarcadores en el futuro de la medicina personalizada.

Cuts in reimbursement and imaging, new Joint Commission standards and increasing patient expectations were top topics at AHRA2016.

A “sea change” in the environment of care, cuts in reimbursement and new standards from the Joint Commission were among the topics causing heartburn for radiology administrators at the AHRA2016 annual meeting.Image of person showing stress to AHRA updates

Sarah Hostetter of the Advisory Board Company opened her presentation by saying that “the changes in healthcare are enough to induce the need for an imaging stress test”. She then delivered an informative presentation on the “Key Forces Shaping Imaging Economics” that include volume, growth and regulatory outlooks for imaging, and the impacts of consumerism and value-based care.

Added stressors came in the form of updated standards from the Joint Commission that were presented by Judith Atkins, RN, MSN, McKenna Consulting. “For most providers, most of their reimbursement comes from Medicare. So Medicare has the power and they drove the Joint Commission to change its diagnostic standards,” Atkins said. “The new parameters will dramatically decrease imaging numbers.”

Patient portals and growth of the X-ray detector market are in the news

Articles include: the X-ray detector market is expected to reach $2.9 billion by 2021; experts call for a national medical device evaluation system in the U.S.; a court decision could potentially change the role radiologists play Image of an x-raywhen it comes to determining the medical necessity of a study ordered by a referring physician; patient portals offer access to imaging exam results quickly while also helping patients track their own care and communicate with their doctors; and the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Million Veteran Program now has the distinction of being the largest genomic database in the world.

X-ray detector market to reach $2.9B by 2021 – AuntMinnie

The global xray detector market will reach $2.9 billion by 2021, growing at a compound annual growth rate of 5.5%, according to a new report from MarketsandMarkets. The growth will be prompted by technological advances, an increasingly elderly population, government and venture capital funding, volume growth of orthopaedic and cardiovascular procedures and reimbursement cuts for analog systems, MarketsandMarkets said.

Top news includes clinical decision making, EHRs and personalized recommendations in healthcare

 

This week’s articles include: radiologists playing a more active role in clinical decision making; use of EHR and CPOE systems create added clerical work for doctors; new systems can deliver a doctor’s personalized recommendations to patients to enhance compliance; a color-coded, user-friendly dashboard that tracks ER exams allows medical staff to better monitor patients; and companies are experimenting with ways to reach lower-income patients through apps, text messaging and video conferencing.

Radiologists Take On Bigger Role in Diagnosis – Wall Street Journal

At one of the top radiology departments in the country radiologists are now playing an active role in helping clinicians make medical decisions for their patients. Radiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center provide their analysis of imaging studies (via computer screen) as medical staff make their rounds in pediatrApplications in healthcare photoic intensive care units, where frail patients are imaged daily to monitor their progress. The initiative to involve radiologists in making treatment decisions is led by Michael Recht, chairman of the radiology department, who oversees more than 200 physicians
and researchers.

EHRs are making things harder for physicians – DotMed Healthcare Business News

Physicians who used an EHR and CPOE were 30 percent less likely to be satisfied with clerical burden, according to a Mayo Clinic physician who was the lead author of a study. Doctors spend hours placing orders for patient procedures such as imaging exams and lab tests and are also spending more than 10 hours a week using the EHR on nights and weekends, according to the study.