In the news: reducing inappropriate imaging and archiving POC ultrasound studies Articles include: a study that finds radiologists can work with referring physicians to significantly reduce inappropriate imaging; the topic of deconstructed PACS is creating controversy; telehealth initiatives are beginning to gain ground; a study reports

Join the Carestream health IT forum

Everyone has social networks; some online and others offline. These social networks are built around interpersonal relationships among friends, family and acquaintances. In contrast, the foundation of online communities is mutual Picture of the logo for Carestream’s VIBE communityinterests rather than personal relationships.

In healthcare IT, the common interest is using technology solutions to their fullest and sharing ideas for innovations to improve productivity and patient care. The online community becomes even more powerful when users of technology are connected to the provider of the solution, giving everyone a comfortable forum to learn and benefit from each other. As a result, new and deeper relationships can be formed, and a greater level of trust can be achieved.

Carestream has a worldwide virtual community for users of its health IT product portfolio, Carestream Vue.  The group, called VIBE (Very Important Board of End Users) is a forum for our IT customers to communicate, collaborate and educate each other – and with Carestream. Direct collaboration between Carestream and our end users is essential to making sure that our products are in synch with the market’s changing needs. Our users are very active in the online forum, with a 40% engagement rate – much higher than the industry benchmark of 15%. Here’s why they participate:

L’application d’algorithmes va faire progresser les soins de santé préventifs

Arrêtez-vous un instant et prenez le temps d’observer les images que les radiologues sont en train de consulter. Elles pourraient bien disparaître complètement.

Dans un avenir proche, il se peut que les radiologues analysent des “nombres” plutôt que des images. Ce changement radical permettrait non seulement de faire un grand pas vers l’objectif fixé en matière de médecine préventive mais il pourrait surtout modifier le système de soins de santé dans son ensemble. Voici les explications.radiologue, visualisation, image

De nos jours, les médecins prescrivent des examens d’imagerie afin de déceler la présence d’une cause ou d’une maladie spécifique et généralement caractéristique. Les données de pixel acquises à l’aide de la modalité d’imagerie sont assemblées (ou reconstruites / affichées) pour former une image compréhensible par le cerveau humain. Les radiologues sont formés pour reconnaître, comprendre et analyser les formes, les ombres et les couleurs présentes sur cette image afin de poser un diagnostic.

The application of algorithms will advance preventative healthcare

Radiologists, stop and savor the images you are reading. They might disappear from view.

In the not-so-distant future, radiologists might analyze ‘numbers’ rather than images. This radical change has the potential to change not only the role of radiologists, but also to advance the goal of preventative care. Radiologist viewing imageHere’s how big data in radiology might change the future.

Today, physicians order imaging exams to detect the presence of a specific and usually singular cause or disease. The pixel data that is captured by the imaging modality is assembled (or reconstructed / displayed) in an image that is meaningful to the human brain. Radiologists are educated to recognize, understand, and analyze the shapes, shades, and colors within that image in order to render a diagnosis.

Integrating clinical information supports the needs of the community

Baystate Health is an integrated delivery network (IDN) that includes five hospitals and more than 90 primary and specialty care practices serving a region of western Massachusetts with 800,000 residents. We know that patients who are coming to our facilities are also visiting other facilities outside of our network. As a result, they might be at risk of receiving duplicate procedures and imaging exams.Exchanging information to enhance patient care

To address these concerns and to enhance patient care, we spent several million dollars to expand our electronic health record (EHR) into a regional health information exchange (HIE). We then invited hospitals and physician groups outside our network to participate at no cost to make our HIE both attractive and more effective.

Starting with an electronic medical record (EMR) and associated applications that provide demographic, claim and coding data, we built a clinical data repository that integrates and aggregates clinical information from Baystate entities and facilitates interfaces with disparate data sources from other organizations and their EMRs. Our platform addresses the challenge of standardizing the proprietary code language and data sets from the various EMR platforms to create a comprehensive view of patient health information.

Defined requirements lay the path for future growth and change

As healthcare organizations plan for the future growth and integration of clinical data into their IT ecosystems, it’s crucial to start with clearly defining the functional requirements that span the needs of users across the enterprise. Why? Because well-defined functional requirements specify exactly what IT systems need to accomplish in each department and across the healthcare organization, and delineate the metrics for success. Also, functional requirements help frame the core questions posed in Requests for Proposals (RFPs) or tenders and define for vendors the capabilities that must be provided to advance interoperability and accessibility. Lastly, if your organization wants to plan for growth and change, functional requirements define the standards that must be met to ensure future compatibility and minimize disruption.

This white paper provides an overview of the key functional requirements that must be built around four distinct modules:

  • Data capture and ingestion
  • Clinical management
  • Enterprise repository/archive
  • Collaboration

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This week’s articles include: tips for providers who are changing healthcare information systems; University at Buffalo and UBMD Orthopaedics win a $2 million NIH grant to study concussion damage; the FTC increases protection for consumer health data; an international team builds a new type of low-dose xray detector; and two-factor authentication can help protect the security of your accounts.

Tips for radiology practices on changing information systems – Diagnostic ImagingCarestream Clinical Collaboration

Get a prenuptial agreement before partnering with your PACS vendor. That’s the recommendation of Steven C. Horii, MD, director of medical informatics in the department of radiology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Horii says the agreement should include guaranteed access to your old database and – in the event the vendor goes out of business – access to their database schema. Also, when considering a HIS or RIS replacement, find out how prospective vendors will handle the conversion and desired workflow capabilities.

University of Buffalo awarded $2 million grant to study concussions – Health Imaging

Researchers at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Buffalo received a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the impact concussions have on an individual’s body and brain. Physicians from UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine will conduct the study and are looking for teenage participants.

Enterprise Imaging Strategies for M&AsTres estrategias para minimizar la interrupción de servicio después de una fusión

Como consultor de las TI en el Cuidado de la Salud, tengo la oportunidad de reunirme con altos ejecutivos en hospitales a lo largo del país. Debido a la tendencia de adquisiciones por la fuerte afiliación al cuidado de la salud hoy en día, no me sorprende que este sea un tema principal para altos ejecutivos y líderes de los departamentos que se verán afectados. Una preocupación particular es asegurarse de que los servicios de imagenologia no se vean interrumpidos durante o después de la adquisición. Esto requiere que la protección y accesibilidad a través de ajustes de cuidados. Para poder hacer frente a este desafío se requiere una estrategia de imagenologia robusta a lo largo de la empresa posterior a la fusión. Recientemente, El Instituto para la Transformación de Tecnología para la Salud (iHT2) llevo a cabo un proyecto de investigación, del cual fui participe. De esta investigación resultaron un detallado libro blanco y un seminario que exploró tres estrategias clave de integración:

  • Estrategia Centrada en el Departamento de PACS
  • Estrategia Centrada en la Empresa de Almacenaje
  • Estrategia a lo Largo de la Empresa

These Letters Have a Lot to Say about the Past, Present and Future of Healthcare IT

Per leggere la storia in italiano, clicca qui

Last week, Part I of this series looked at the motivations, challenges and standards involved in developing EMR / EHRs to support more efficient and effective patient-centered care. We also looked into the history of the PACS concept for acquiring, archiving, managing and accessing radiology images.

In Part II, we look at the evolution of PACS technology to serve diagnostic departments beyond radiology. And we introduce another acronym, the VNA (Vendor Neutral Archive), which points the way to a fully interconnected platform for sharing clinical images from every department across the enterprise. Thereby supporting the imaging requirements of the acronyms we began with in Part I: the EMR / EHR.  Carestream-clinical-collaboration-platform