EMR, EHR, PACS e VNA: Guardare al di là degli acronimi [Parte 2]

Parte 2 dei nostri ABC sul passato, presente e futuro dell’IT sanitaria

La settimana scorsa, nella Parte 1 di questa serie abbiamo esaminato le motivazioni, le sfide e gli standard coinvolti nello sviluppo degli EMR / EHR per supportare una cura più efficiente e più efficace incentrata sul paziente. Inoltre abbiamo considerato la storia del concetto del PACS per l’acquisizione, archiviazione, gestione e accesso alle immagini radiologiche.

Nella Parte 2, tratteremo l’evoluzione della tecnologia PACS per dipartimenti diagnostici al di là della radiologia. Introdurremo un altro acronimo, il VNA (Vendor-Neutral Archive), che indica la strada verso una piattaforma completamente interconnessa per la condivisione di immagini cliniche provenienti da tutti i dipartimenti dell’intera struttura sanitaria. A questo proposito, nella Parte 1 tra gli acronimi avevamo iniziato, sul tema dei requisiti per l’imaging, con l’ EMR / EHR.Carestream Clinical Imaging

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CIO Perspective: Business and technology alignment remains top concern

Study reveals CIOs worry most about matching technology with business needsVueIcon.docx - Microsoft Word

CIOs have a lot on their mind, especially when it comes to understanding the latest technologies and their applications. According to the Society for Information Management’s 2016 IT Trends Study, a top CIO concern is making IT more responsive to the organization and better aligning IT with the business. A case in point: in healthcare: the right investment in technology can improve access to clinical images and patient data, and promote collaboration.

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EMR, EHR, PACS & VNA: Looking Beyond the Acronyms [Part One of Two]

These Letters Have a Lot to Say about the Past, Present and Future of HealthIT

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Sometimes talking about health information technologies can feel like trying to read alphabet soup. More than most industries, ours can seem like a simmering stew of acronyms.2016-02-17 09_44_20-_ 2

Even if you’ve mastered the letters and what they mean, you may find yourself challenged by the need to converse with others who haven’t. And technologies can intersect in various ways, adding to the confusion.

Here’s a quick overview of a few important acronyms – what they mean, how they relate to each other and what they say about the past, present and future of healthcare IT – along with links to more information.

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Diagnostic Reading #7: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

EHR TechnologyThis week’s articles include: a study that finds advanced EHRs can reduce adverse effects; the opportunity for radiologists to participate in value-based healthcare models; increased use of telehealth technology by substance abuse treatment providers; tweaks to PACS workstation software that could help radiologists cope with the data deluge; and a nationwide analysis of electronic health records that has uncovered several previously unknown risk factors for Type 2 diabetes.

Patients with fully electronic health records experienced fewer adverse events, such as hospital-acquired infections, according to a study funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and published in the Journal of Patient Safety.

Improve population health. Optimize the patient experience. And cut costs. That, of course, is the “Triple Aim,” the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s boiled-down Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #6: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

This week’s articles focus on the role information technology will play in the moon shot for healthcare, topics CIOs should consider when managing PACS technology, the persistent value of the stethoscope, a program in which radiologists learn how to give patients good and bad news, and a projection that U.S. funding for on-demand healthcare companies will quadruple to reach $1 billion by the end of 2017.

Health spending in 2015 eclipsed $3.2 trillion a year, or 18 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. CMS projects healthcare spending to reach $4.3 trillion by 2020 (18.5 percent of Diagnostic Reading PACSGDP) and $5.4 trillion by 2024 (19.6 percent of GDP). Here are six critical components for a moon shot that would give healthcare a chance to reach the ultimate goals it needs to achieve. Information technology isn’t the only answer in many of these, but it can play a powerful supporting role.

PACS can represent a particular challenge for CIOs. The technology has evolved from being confined to a silo within the radiology Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #4: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Our Diagnostic Reading Top Picks

This week’s articles describe the high priority radiologists Diagnostic Reading #5 - Radiology and Health IT Articlesplace integrating PACS with an EHR, expected growth for the global ultrasound market, patients’ desire for personalized treatment, Radiology Today’s top picks for areas within the imaging space that promise the greatest innovations and a study that indicates mentally demanding activities may play an important role in maintaining a healthy brain.

With such a wide variety of PACS and electronic health records (EHRs) in the marketplace, decision-makers at hospitals and private practices have a lot to consider when purchasing new equipment. If they want to keep their radiologists happy, they may want to make sure the PACS can be properly integrated with the EHR. According to a recent study published by the Journal of the American College of Radiology, an integrated EHR is a bigger priority to radiologists than having access to the most advanced clinical features.

The global ultrasound marke Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #2: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

This week’s diagnostic reading articles describe the need to deploy Healthcare Vue for Radiology enterprise image viewers, growing adoption of telemedicine tools by healthcare providers, changes expected in data security, cloud and mobile technologies, why radiologists need to lead change and how patient-centric care can result in shorter perceived wait times and greater satisfaction.

Providers have more work to do to expand enterprise image viewing, which gives clinicians the ability to quickly view patient images without limitations on where they can view them, according to the results of a new HIMSS Analytics survey. The survey of 144 hospital, health system and ambulatory PACS/radiology leaders, follows a similar study conducted by HIMSS Analytics in late 2014 to gauge trends in provider adoption of enterprise image viewing. Less than half of respondents indicated that they use an enterprise image viewer to meet their diagnostic imaging needs.

Telemedicine tools like smartphones, two-way video, email, and wearable technology are becoming increasingly common in many healthcare settings. In 2014, HIMSS led a study that found that 46 percent of more than 400 hospitals and medical practices said they used at least one type of telemedicine. Additionally, the Academy of Integrative Health & Medicine (AIHM) found that 33 percent of U.S. healthcare practitioners offered healthcare services via telephone, video, or webcam visits, and another 29 percent planned to do so in the next few years.

Several industry analysts have forecast that 2016 will be the ‘year of action’ on many technology fronts, as several recent trends become commonplace strategies. Cloud computing, data security and mobile are tops among them. This article contains six predictions for what we can expect in 2016 on the mobile technology and cloud computing fronts.

Frank Lexa, MD, MBA, radiology residency director for Drexel University College of Medicine, calls upon radiologists to lead change “because if you let someone make changes who doesn’t understand what we do, it will be damaging to our industry and to your patients.” He advises radiologists to pick one project in one location, and demonstrate its value before spreading any alterations elsewhere.

Focusing on a patient’s satisfaction can lead to shorter perceived wait times and higher patient satisfaction, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Anna Holbrook, MD, Emory University School of Medicine, and colleagues studied questionnaires completed by 147 MR outpatients who had received care from a radiology department in which “patient experience” was a stated strategic priority. The authors found patients often believed the wait time was almost half what it actually was and were satisfied with the experience.

X-rays and Mom — Case Study into the State of Imaging Technology

Reposted from Imaging Technology News (ITN) with permission.

While I write a lot about medical imaging technology and how new technology can and should work, it is not often that I get to experience how things actually work in the real world. This past Thanksgiving I received a call from a paramedic explaining that my mom had fractured her leg and I should stop working on the turkey and fixings and rush to the emergency department (ED) at Edward Hospital in Naperville, Ill. She had been walking her dog on wet grass and leaves in a park when her dog took off after another dog and pulled her down. She was whipped around and the change in weight caused her to dislocate her ankle (the bottom of her shoe was facing her when she looked at her feet) and caused a spiral fracture to her fibula.

ImagingTechnologyNews December-2015 X-ray_Fractured_fibula_with_permission_of_patient_MF

A bedside screen shot of a Carestream DRX mobile X-ray in the ED of the fractured fibula.

When I got there my mom was already heavily sedated due to the pain and because the ED staff had already put her ankle back in place. The ED doctor ordered a digital radiograph (DR) of her leg to see the extent of damage. They wheeled in a new Carestream DRX mobile X-ray system and I had a live demonstration of how fast these types of systems can snap the pictures. It called up the images immediately on the machine’s screen. The image of the Pott’s fracture with fragments was really interesting as someone who covers radiology, but I also realized from a non-clinical standpoint she was really messed up and in pain. Additionally, she would need reconstructive surgery to put her Humpty Dumpty leg back together again. She was way up the creek without a paddle with it being Thanksgiving and there were no orthopedic surgeons in staff due to the holiday. The day after Thanksgiving was not much better, as we found, since most physicians were out through the following Monday. So the ER splinted the leg, wrapped it in ace bandages and sent her home with heavy pain killers.

Compounding her mobility issues was the fact that she has bilateral knee replacements. Due to the trauma, broken bone and knowing she had these implants that further limited her ability to move around, she was prescribed a prophylactic anticoagulant.

Knowing we would need the images for a surgeon to review, I had the ED burn a CD. However, I was happy to find

ITN NEWS Orthopedic_Surgery_repair_of_Broken_fibula_with_permission_of_patient_MF_0

The post-surgical X-ray showing the bone repair, which was accessed and copied by the patient using a patient portal.

Edward is among the growing number of hospitals to grant patients access to their health records via a DR Systems Internet image/results distribution system. This technology pulls images and reports from the hospitals’ Epic EMR (electronic medical record) system and makes them available for remote viewing by clinicians outside of the hospital’s picture archiving and communication system (PACS). She also was given login instructions at discharge for a patient portal so she could access her records and images herself on a home computer or smartphone.

We managed to find one orthopedic surgeon in their office on the Friday after Thanksgiving. They thought it was great that we had a CD, but before attempting to open it, they asked which hospital she had been at. Edward was already in a health information exchange, so outlying offices such as this one from a different medical group could access her records remotely in less than a minute. They were able to call up her images and see what meds she was prescribed, which made the office visit go much faster.

She had surgery on Dec. 1, the Tuesday of RSNA 2015. The orthopedic surgeon practiced at Elmhurst Hospital in Elmhurst, Ill., across the county from Naperville. But, thanks to the remote image viewing system, they could get the ED images for reference and planning. The surgeon’s post-surgery DR image showing the reconstruction of the fibula also was available via my mom’s patient portal.

She did what most patients today do with this type of access and posted her X-rays on Facebook. Leveraging the Facebook form of patient engagement, the result was lots of sympathy, flowers and friends volunteering to help her with things around the house and groceries since she cannot walk or drive for at least two months.

While an unfortunate incident and a horrible thing to have happen to my mom, from a professional standpoint, I was happy to see the technology I cover working in the real world as it was intended. The speed in workflow efficiency, speed and ease of access to her imaging at the point of care and remotely, and access to a patient portal are all examples of how the healthcare system should work. In this case, the technology and imaging integration was flawless.

David_FDave Fornell, ITN Editor

Dave Fornell is the editor of Diagnostic & Interventional Cardiology magazine and assistant editor for Imaging Technology News magazine.

 


Imaging Case Study: Carestream Mobile DRX-Revolution

 

To learn more about the CARESTREAM DRX-Revolution, click here.

Top Five Health IT Blogs of 2015 from Everything Rad

As we near the end of 2015, it is a popular time of year to take a look back at the blogs that generated the highest interest throughout the year. In this summary, we look at some of the most popular Everything Rad healthcare IT blogs of 2015 covering value based healthcare, radiology reporting, meaningful use and clinical collaboration.

  1. Four Reasons Multimedia is the Future of Radiology Reporting – We have been touting the power of multimedia-enhanced radiology reporting for some time. We have shown the history of reporting in our industry, as well as showcased the important business cases multimedia reporting provides to departments via referrals from physicians. In brief—multimedia-enhanced radiology reporting is the future.
  1. What Does Clinical Collaboration Really Mean? – Clinical collaboration was born out the use of our vendor-neutral archive (VNA). The VNA served as a housing mechanism for medical images across a variety of –ologies, not just limited to DICOM images. With the VNA, the images remain safe and accessible when necessary, however, to enable intelligent, user-based sharing, more than just storage is needed.
  1. Imaging’s Place in Value-Based Healthcare – The answer to a question asked in a SIIM 2015 Friday morning session was clear–medical imaging needs to make further progress to be in a position to provide value-based care.
  1. White Paper: Metadata – Creating Meaningful Access to Clinical Images & Data – Metadata is explored in greater depth in an effort to truly uncover its value and importance not only medical imaging, but also in all patient clinical data.
  1. Video: The Value of Imaging Sharing in Clinical Collaboration – See how image sharing on the Clinical Collaboration Platform is able to give clinicians real time, on-demand access to imaging results, as well as how it can empower patients to share their images between facilities, physicians, and specialists. 

Radiology Insights #55: Five Must-Read Articles From the Past Week

This week’s articles focus on the move to personalized medicine, increased imaging use in the ED, an IDC reportCarestream, Radiology that predicts increased cyberattacks on patients’ healthcare data, the value of data stored in RIS and PACS systems for effective decision support, and a study that compared radiology findings with diagnoses provided by other clinical data sources.

Top 5 trends from RSNA 2015 in Chicago – AuntMinnie

This year, RSNA cast its gaze forward, looking at the trends that will shape medical imaging in the years to come. The move toward personalized medicine and data analytics will enable radiologists to find circumstances where imaging can be used most efficiently and economically. There is no doubt that the future of healthcare will be technology-driven, and it’s hard to find a medical specialty more grounded in technology than radiology.

Overall imaging use has slowed — but ED rates still high – AuntMinnie

Despite an overall slowdown in the rate of noninvasive diagnostic imaging in other settings, imaging use rates have continued to increase in the emergency department (ED), according to a study presented at the RSNA 2015 meeting by researchers from Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Why do imaging use rates in the ED keep climbing? It could be because emergency departments are a significant source of medical care in the U.S. In fact, nationwide ED visits increased from 95 million per year in 1997 to nearly 140 million in recent years, which translates into higher imaging use rates, Patel said. Other factors include defensive medicine, dependence on technology, and the difficulty of evaluating complex patients under tight time constraints, she said.

Cyberattacks will compromise 1-in-3 healthcare records next year – ComputerWorld

Consumers will see an increase in successful cyberattacks against their online health records next year. A new report from IDC’s Health Insights group claims that because of a legacy of lackluster electronic security in healthcare and an increase in the amount of online patient data, one in three consumers will have their healthcare records compromised by cyberattacks in 2016. “Frankly, healthcare data is really valuable from a cyber criminal standpoint. It could be 5, 10 or even 50 times more valuable than other forms of data,” said Lynne Dunbrack, research vice president for IDC’s Health Insights.

Too much Big Data may not be enough – Health Management Technology

The quest to mine and analyze meaningful, reliable, and useful data from the burgeoning plethora of electronic and online sources, healthcare organizations can allow the big picture to overshadow many underlying and valuable components contributing to patient care improvement. The clinical data and diagnostic images in radiology information systems (RIS) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) remain two examples. For clinical imaging and radiology executives, these visual clues and cues are necessary for effective, efficient decision support. Certainly a growing number of manufacturers and information technology companies recognize this. As a result, they’re offering providers a light at the end of the tunnel.

System compares radiology results with downstream clinical information – Health Imaging

A system comparing radiology findings with diagnoses provided by other clinical data sources was recently put to the test in a study published online in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.  Early indications are that it passed. Lead researcher William Hsu, PhD, of Medical Imaging Informatics Group in Los Angeles, and colleagues evaluated their system, which pulls data from electronic health records and examines clinical reports for imaging studies relevant to the diagnosis. They said the goal of their system was “to establish a method for measuring the accuracy of a health system at multiple levels of granularity, from individual radiologists to subspecialty sections, modalities, and entire departments.”