Clinical Collaboration—Are You Providing Access?

Health IT systems  shift from record keeping to access that enables clinical collaboration

Until the middle of the last decade, the primary goal of the EMR/EHR was actually to capture information, cine_rotating2not to provide access to it – impeding clinical collaboration. It was a reference for doctors—a way to capture patient notes. It has since evolved from an archival role to an active collaborative role, providing access to reports, records, and images for all stakeholders involved in patient care.

Availability of a useful, problem-focused medical record

The idea for a comprehensive, organized medical record was pioneered by Dr. Larry Weed in 1956, but it didn’t become well accepted in the U.S. until after 1968. Dr. Weed—known as the father of the Problem-Oriented Medical Record (PMD)—described the concept in his often cited NEJM articles.[1]

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Reno Diagnostic Centers Increase Efficiency in Radiology


Centers consolidate workstations with Carestream Vue RIS and Vue PACS

Imaging technology applications have the potential to provide many benefits – including increased efficiency. With this goal in mind, Reno Diagnostic Centers of Reno Nevada implemented Carestream’s Vue RIS and Vue PACS to help streamline workflow in radiology.

“We recognized the opportunity to use technology to our advantage to increase the efficiency of the entire operation with a primary focus on making the radiologist as efficient as possible,” said Ron Milbank, Director of IT at Reno Diagnostic Centers.

The pair of outpatient imaging centers does about 75,000 exams a year across all modalities. By implementing Carestream’s RIS and PACS solutions, they were able to eliminate multiple, disparate workstations including mammography and PET-CT fusion workstations as well as regular RAD workstations.

“When you add up the cost of those stations, plus the support contracts that go along with them, the training curve for the radiologists to learn all that software, and the opportunity to lose all those stations – there’s a big benefit to consolidation,” said Milbank.

The goal for 2017? More efficiency in radiology and continued high levels of patient care.

“We continue to look for ways to have the rads interact with the software as little as possible to accomplish their job at a complexity and quality level that exceeds the competitors, and is way above the minimum standard,” emphasized Milbank.

Hear more about Reno Diagnostic Centers in this video interview. #HCIS

Healthcare Providers Can Create 3D Anatomical Models from Radiology Images

Carestream Health integrates Materialise service that produces 3D anatomical models for medical applications

If a picture is worth a thousand words, how much is an actual physical anatomical model worth?

For some healthcare providers, the ability to see and touch a 3D visualization of pathology or a model of an organ prior to surgery could be priceless. That’s why Carestream is collaborating with Materialise NV to provide healthcare providers with a Web-based printing service to create 3D anatomical models.

AnatomyPrint ge3d anatomical modelnerates 3D anatomical models from STL files that originate with data in Carestream’s Clinical Collaboration Platform. Materialise can use the files to generate detailed 3D printed models for healthcare providers.

“Our printing service enables healthcare providers to quickly and effortlessly send imaging data to our company, which is a premier supplier of 3D models used in medical applications,” said Brigitte de Vet, Vice President of Materialise Medical Unit. “This technology can help a clinician visualize the anatomy in 3D, which can assist in providing improved patient outcomes.” Continue reading

Cloud hosted PACS Solutions Help Address Medical Staffing Shortages

Access to radiology reports can help eliminate barriers and enable collaboration

Close-up of surgeons hands holding surgical scissors

The number of new innovations in health IT can be overwhelming. Hospital CIOs and administrators must help evaluate new software for referral management, applications for improved transparency, and analytics software. How can HIT directors and hospital administrators decide which technologies are worth investing in? Answer: start with the ones – like cloud hosted PACS solutions – that solve a real problem – like radiology staffing shortages.

Nicola Strickland, head of the Royal College of Radiologists, made a convincing case to The Observer in 2016 for “how the crisis in radiology recruitment will break the entire NHS system in Britain”. And in January 2017, AuntMinnie Europe painted a dire picture of how a hard Brexit would further strain the lack of radiology resources.

Other parts of Europe, especially rural areas, face a similar problem. The shortage of radiologists and other health professionals is driving medical providers with no formal or previous affiliations to find ways to pool their resources and collaborate among their sites.

Fortunately, cloud based services and teleradiology are toppling the geographic barriers. An increasing number of medical health providers in Europe are installing PACS – Picture Archiving and Communication Systems – and hosting them in the cloud. For example, Spire Healthcare, one of the largest private healthcare groups in the UK, enabled cross site reporting using the Carestream cloud. Using different cloud services from Carestream, Spire Healthcare can store and archive data to enable cross site reporting and then distribution of the reports and associated images. Continue reading

Medical Device Decision Priorities—a Worldwide Look

Throughout the U.S. and worldwide, equipment decision criteria are not so different

There are clear advantages to having new, up-to-date medical devices; including gains in productivity and efficiency. Medical equipment can support the movement to reduce healthcare costs and increase its efficiency and effectiveness. This movement is worldwide, and nothing new, as a graphic on medical device prioritiesMcKinsey report[1] stated a few years ago. “Today, medical device companies operate in a different world. In developed countries, healthcare systems are under acute financial pressure…. Developing economies are transforming the environment, too…. Success in emerging markets requires a deep understanding of stakeholders’ needs.”

New stakeholders influence purchase decisions

And new stakeholders are changing the way organizations look at the purchase of medical equipment. “In the developed world, decisions that used to be the sole preserve of doctors are now also made by regulators, hospital administrators, and other non-clinicians…. The result of this phenomenon is a shift from individual outcomes to a focus on population-level effectiveness.” Also, big data is beginning to offer a new level of evidence-based data that helps us evaluate the true advantages of technology.

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White Paper: Interoperability of Health Information Systems

The challenges and pathways to creating a unified framework for capturing, distributing and accessing clinical information

What is interoperability in healthcare? Interoperability can be described as a well-functioning central nervous system, coordinating the enterprise’s many roles and tasks toward a common end: the well-being of each patient.

illustration depicting connection

But when communications are slow, incomplete, or missing between any two entities — patients and providers, primary-care physicians and specialists, central and remote locations, and so on — the timeliness and quality of patient care can suffer. Many other parts of the total healthcare ecosystem can be affected as well: costs can rise, resources can be allocated inefficiently, and opportunities for constructive collaboration can be lost.

Information generated by different systems, on different networks and for different purposes becomes far more useful when a unified framework is in place for capturing, distributing and using the information. Ideally, with the appropriate security credentials, any individual user or collaborative team should be able to interact with the information they need, in the format they prefer, on their choice of device.

Why is interoperability important to healthcare?

Every stakeholder in the healthcare delivery process stands to benefit from interoperable systems built on interoperability standards that deliver collaborative transparency and efficiency. These stakeholders include patients who want to take more active responsibility for their own health; primary care physicians and specialists who are seeking meaningful collaboration, without information gaps, delays, or redundancies that could compromise quality; and providers in remote and rural areas who need the ability to share clinical images and data with centrally located specialists. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #29: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology from the Past Week

In the news: reducing inappropriate imaging and archiving POC ultrasound studies

Articles include: a study that finds radiologists can work with referring physicians to significantly reduce inappropriate imaging; the topic of deconstructed PACS is creating controversy; telehealth initiatives are beginning to gain ground; a study reports it’s relatively easy to increase the number of ED point-of-care ultrasound studies being archived on PACS; and functional MRI might help settle an open question over “second impact syndrome” in child and teen football players.

Radiologists’ expertise cuts inappropriate imaging

Radiologists who participate in a radiology benefits management program (RBM) by consulting with referring physicians can help reduce inappropriate imaging by at least 20%, according to a new study published in the July edition of the American Journal of Roentgenology. This finding is good news for a specialty long considered to be behind the scenes in patient care.

Deconstructed PACS: 12 Tidbits on Hype, Reality, Caveats, ProspectsModule Image

There are few topics that create more controversy in the imaging informatics marketplace than the topic of deconstructed PACS, which could alter revenue flow in imaging IT while yielding a profound impact on vendors’ go-to market strategy.

 

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Online User Communities Help Companies and Customers Innovate Together

Join the Carestream health IT forum

Everyone has social networks; some online and others offline. These social networks are built around interpersonal relationships among friends, family and acquaintances. In contrast, the foundation of online communities is mutual Picture of the logo for Carestream’s VIBE communityinterests rather than personal relationships.

In healthcare IT, the common interest is using technology solutions to their fullest and sharing ideas for innovations to improve productivity and patient care. The online community becomes even more powerful when users of technology are connected to the provider of the solution, giving everyone a comfortable forum to learn and benefit from each other. As a result, new and deeper relationships can be formed, and a greater level of trust can be achieved.

Carestream has a worldwide virtual community for users of its health IT product portfolio, Carestream Vue.  The group, called VIBE (Very Important Board of End Users) is a forum for our IT customers to communicate, collaborate and educate each other – and with Carestream. Direct collaboration between Carestream and our end users is essential to making sure that our products are in synch with the market’s changing needs. Our users are very active in the online forum, with a 40% engagement rate – much higher than the industry benchmark of 15%. Here’s why they participate:

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Big Data : l’avenir de l’imagerie réside-t-il dans les chiffres?

L’application d’algorithmes va faire progresser les soins de santé préventifs

Arrêtez-vous un instant et prenez le temps d’observer les images que les radiologues sont en train de consulter. Elles pourraient bien disparaître complètement.

Dans un avenir proche, il se peut que les radiologues analysent des “nombres” plutôt que des images. Ce changement radical permettrait non seulement de faire un grand pas vers l’objectif fixé en matière de médecine préventive mais il pourrait surtout modifier le système de soins de santé dans son ensemble. Voici les explications.radiologue, visualisation, image

De nos jours, les médecins prescrivent des examens d’imagerie afin de déceler la présence d’une cause ou d’une maladie spécifique et généralement caractéristique. Les données de pixel acquises à l’aide de la modalité d’imagerie sont assemblées (ou reconstruites / affichées) pour former une image compréhensible par le cerveau humain. Les radiologues sont formés pour reconnaître, comprendre et analyser les formes, les ombres et les couleurs présentes sur cette image afin de poser un diagnostic.

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Big Data in Radiology: Is The Future of Imaging a Number?

The application of algorithms will advance preventative healthcare

Radiologists, stop and savor the images you are reading. They might disappear from view.

In the not-so-distant future, radiologists might analyze ‘numbers’ rather than images. This radical change has the potential to change not only the role of radiologists, but also to advance the goal of preventative care. Radiologist viewing imageHere’s how big data in radiology might change the future.

Today, physicians order imaging exams to detect the presence of a specific and usually singular cause or disease. The pixel data that is captured by the imaging modality is assembled (or reconstructed / displayed) in an image that is meaningful to the human brain. Radiologists are educated to recognize, understand, and analyze the shapes, shades, and colors within that image in order to render a diagnosis.

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