Reno Diagnostic Centers Increase Efficiency in Radiology


Centers consolidate workstations with Carestream Vue RIS and Vue PACS

Imaging technology applications have the potential to provide many benefits – including increased efficiency. With this goal in mind, Reno Diagnostic Centers of Reno Nevada implemented Carestream’s Vue RIS and Vue PACS to help streamline workflow in radiology.

“We recognized the opportunity to use technology to our advantage to increase the efficiency of the entire operation with a primary focus on making the radiologist as efficient as possible,” said Ron Milbank, Director of IT at Reno Diagnostic Centers.

The pair of outpatient imaging centers does about 75,000 exams a year across all modalities. By implementing Carestream’s RIS and PACS solutions, they were able to eliminate multiple, disparate workstations including mammography and PET-CT fusion workstations as well as regular RAD workstations.

“When you add up the cost of those stations, plus the support contracts that go along with them, the training curve for the radiologists to learn all that software, and the opportunity to lose all those stations – there’s a big benefit to consolidation,” said Milbank.

The goal for 2017? More efficiency in radiology and continued high levels of patient care.

“We continue to look for ways to have the rads interact with the software as little as possible to accomplish their job at a complexity and quality level that exceeds the competitors, and is way above the minimum standard,” emphasized Milbank.

Hear more about Reno Diagnostic Centers in this video interview. #HCIS

White Paper: Interoperability of Health Information Systems

The challenges and pathways to creating a unified framework for capturing, distributing and accessing clinical information

What is interoperability in healthcare? Interoperability can be described as a well-functioning central nervous system, coordinating the enterprise’s many roles and tasks toward a common end: the well-being of each patient.

illustration depicting connection

But when communications are slow, incomplete, or missing between any two entities — patients and providers, primary-care physicians and specialists, central and remote locations, and so on — the timeliness and quality of patient care can suffer. Many other parts of the total healthcare ecosystem can be affected as well: costs can rise, resources can be allocated inefficiently, and opportunities for constructive collaboration can be lost.

Information generated by different systems, on different networks and for different purposes becomes far more useful when a unified framework is in place for capturing, distributing and using the information. Ideally, with the appropriate security credentials, any individual user or collaborative team should be able to interact with the information they need, in the format they prefer, on their choice of device.

Why is interoperability important to healthcare?

Every stakeholder in the healthcare delivery process stands to benefit from interoperable systems built on interoperability standards that deliver collaborative transparency and efficiency. These stakeholders include patients who want to take more active responsibility for their own health; primary care physicians and specialists who are seeking meaningful collaboration, without information gaps, delays, or redundancies that could compromise quality; and providers in remote and rural areas who need the ability to share clinical images and data with centrally located specialists. Continue reading

CIO eBook: A Healthcare IT Journey in 8 Chapters

CIO eBook chronicles healthIT migration from paper to electronic record keeping

Three years ago, when we embarked on our CIO eBook, the healthcare IT world was in a different place. EHR adoption was starting to rise, enabling more complete information access electronically within the enterprise.  Images were not typically available via a patient portal. They were hand-carried by the patient or sent by messenger to the referring physician. 3D studies were less prevalent, and study file size was smaller. Storage was a threat, but not a major obstacle. Cloud storage was commonplace for other industries, but not healthcare. Now look at how far we’ve come.

To understand the journey, read the eBook, “From Trust to Use and Beyond,” for a look at the major factors that have been driving clinical collaboration and change in healthcare IT. The interactive eBook takes a case study approach to the critical issues that are at the root of healthcare IT: trust, access, data, mobility, interoperability, integration and VNAs. Here’s a summary of what you’ll learn:

The issue of trust is at the heart of Chapter 1 in our CIO eBook. Clinicians are coping with change by placing trust in the things that have worked for them in the past. They know that when they spend time with patients, outcomes improve. Yet there is never enough time available. Meanwhile, adopting new procedures and a new workflow, no matter how promising the results might sound, is perceived as taking time away from patient care. So clinicians are skeptical. Chapter 1, “Building Trust”, is the story of Maureen Gaffney from Winthrop-University Hospital on Long Island, NY.  She is a clinician—physician’s assistant (PA-C) and RN who has ascended to Senior Vice President Clinical Operations and Chief Medical Information Officer (CMIO). image of Carestream CIOebook

Ms. Gaffney’s approach to transforming her hospital was clear from the start. She began by enlisting the buy-in of senior management at the hospital, ensuring resources and transparency. Most of the actions taken on behalf of her project were guided by multidisciplinary committees which always included a clinician and an informatics specialist as members. The starting place was to ensure data integrity, coupled with an understanding of how the data would be used, and how the electronic version would fit into the clinical workflow. Continue reading

The Next Generation of Multi-Media Reporting in Radiology

Interactive features can boost referrals, and foster collaboration and communication

For decades, radiology reports have been limited to a short paragraph that describes a radiologist’s findings. If key images were available, they were often difficult Survey shows physicians prefer multi-media reportsfor clinicians to access and were not part of the report content.

The next generation of reporting contains hyperlinks as part of the radiologist’s findings so clinicians can easily view key images, measurement tables and graphs. These interactive reports can be easily accessed from the EMR using a zero-footprint viewer that delivers rapid access to key findings and data from multiple “ologies,” and provides side-by-side display of DICOM and non-DICOM images. It is so intuitive that users can be proficient within minutes of use.

EMR-driven access also offers a single point of entry to the entire patient folder including clinical data in multiple formats such as images, video, waveforms and PDF-formatted interactive multi-media reports with embedded hyperlinks to key findings that provide secure access to images from mobile devices and computers.

A paper authored by physicians at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that radiologists and oncologists preferred having hyperlinks to key data in reports. In a pilot study presented at RSNA 2015, NIH researchers found that the use of quantitative interactive reports led to an average of nearly nine minutes in time savings for the oncologist to assess tumor burden when compared to traditional text-only reporting.

Facilities that offer multi-media reporting also could gain increased referrals from physicians, according to a study conducted by the Emory University School of Medicine. This study found that 80 percent of physicians would preferentially refer patients to a healthcare provider with multi-media reporting—and 79 percent of physicians are more likely to recommend that their peers refer patients to a facility with multi-media reporting.

Equipping patients to access their own medical images is also becoming an important ingredient for increased patient satisfaction. A recent study of 1,000 U.S. adults conducted by IDR Medical, an international healthcare marketing company, confirmed two compelling benefits for delivering a patient portal: 79 percent of patients said they would return to the imaging facility and 76 percent of patients reported they would recommend the provider’s services to others.

Enabling patients to access and manage their own images also has the potential to reduce overutilization of imaging procedures since patients can easily send studies to providers or bring prior studies with them to appointments. And patient care can be enhanced by sharing diagnostic, procedural and evidence-related images, video, waveform and multi-media clinical content directly from the EMR.

The adage that an image is worth a thousand words still holds true. Actually it’s worth more than that. Efficient and contextual access to medical images can help improve care by expediting second opinions while simultaneously building referrals and increasing physician and patient satisfaction. #SIIM16 #enterpriseimaging #healthIT

Kiran Krishnamurthy, Worldwide Product Line Manager, HCIS, CarestreamKiran Krishnamurthy is Carestream’s Worldwide Product Line Manager for Healthcare Information Solutions. He participated in a panel at SIIM16 on Communication and Collaboration Using Enterprise Viewers in the EMR

Big Data : l’avenir de l’imagerie réside-t-il dans les chiffres?

L’application d’algorithmes va faire progresser les soins de santé préventifs

Arrêtez-vous un instant et prenez le temps d’observer les images que les radiologues sont en train de consulter. Elles pourraient bien disparaître complètement.

Dans un avenir proche, il se peut que les radiologues analysent des “nombres” plutôt que des images. Ce changement radical permettrait non seulement de faire un grand pas vers l’objectif fixé en matière de médecine préventive mais il pourrait surtout modifier le système de soins de santé dans son ensemble. Voici les explications.radiologue, visualisation, image

De nos jours, les médecins prescrivent des examens d’imagerie afin de déceler la présence d’une cause ou d’une maladie spécifique et généralement caractéristique. Les données de pixel acquises à l’aide de la modalité d’imagerie sont assemblées (ou reconstruites / affichées) pour former une image compréhensible par le cerveau humain. Les radiologues sont formés pour reconnaître, comprendre et analyser les formes, les ombres et les couleurs présentes sur cette image afin de poser un diagnostic.

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CIO eBook Chapter 7: Planning the Information Archive of the Future

The image archive: today through 2020

One of the most challenging aspects of healthcare is planning for the future. In particular, information systems that include images require an understanding not just of the most useful information for today, but also a vision of the projected needs of our many stakeholders in five, 10 or even 20 years from now.

While wPlanning VNA of the Futuree don’t claim to know it all, it is clear that the stakeholders in an information system of the future will include many more collaborators than it does today. Also, the role of the patient will become even more critical as more patients take responsibility to report their own clinical data through wearable devices that send data directly to the electronic health record (EHR). Meanwhile, our clinicians grow in appreciation of the value of access to a complete patient record, including images. And we haven’t yet mentioned the need to provide access to genomic data to inform clinical decision support.

Our CIO eBook chapter on this topic is a good “thought starter”, whether you’re a CIO, a clinician or a professional engaged in healthcare.  Here are a few highlights from the chapter.

To help scope the discussion of planning the archive of the future, we called on two experts—Dr. Mark Blatt, MD, now retired, formerly Worldwide Medical Director, Intel; and Dr. Marco Foracchia, Medical IT Systems Manager, Santa Maria Nuovo Hospital in Reggio Emilia, Italy. Dr. Blatt talked about the trends and developments in technology that enable an institution to organize and access the growing amounts of data that the future will require. Dr. Foracchia gave us an extremely practical view of the experience of planning and implementing an enterprise-wide image-enabled information system. vna_image_input_sources

At Reggio Emilia, the Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) enables intelligent storage of data to support collaboration. The VNA supports storage of various types of images including radiology DICOM data, multi-frame cine loops and images from other sources. This year, they will add genomic information to the VNA.

In his interview, Dr. Blatt describes the amount of data that can go into the VNA as “enormous”. It includes radiology of course, but also dermatology, cardiology including cath, echo, nuclear, GI labs, ophthalmology, pathology, wound care, otorhinolaryngology, neurosurgery and oncology, including the genomic data that’s now stored as image data.

LISTEN NOW: Dr. Mark Blatt on source data for the VNA.

Where do you start with archive planning? At the beginning by surveying the data sources. Dr. Foracchia’s audit of Reggio Emilia revealed 534 data sources, many of which were not apparent prior to the audit.

For more detail on the planning of an archive of the future, along with interviews of Dr. Foracchia and Dr. Blatt, read the CIO eBook, Chapter 7.

What’s in your enterprise archive?  What have you left out and why?  Please comment!

About the CIO eBook: Carestream publishes an eBook based on issues of importance to CIOs and often based on webinars facilitated by the Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT2) Online Thought Leadership Series. It is made possible through an unrestricted grant from Carestream. Read blog posts summarizing earlier chapters of this eBook on Everything Rad.

#EHR #VNA

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Jeff Fleming is Carestream’s Vice President of Sales and Services for Healthcare Information Systems

 

CIO Perspective: The IT Value Proposition of Healthcare Technologies

HealthIT technologies that are flexible provide more value to organizations

The right technology solution can be a catalyst for healthcare providers to achieve their goals. That point is not lost on today’s HealthIT leaders who ranked IT Value Proposition Carestream Vue Clinical Collaboration Platform among their top concerns for 2016 in the annual IT Trends Study from the Society for Information Management (SIM).

Not only was IT Value Proposition in the top 10 of the most important IT management issues for the organization, it was also in the top 10 of the personally most important IT management issues, coming in at No. 6 and No. 8, respectively. Their personal concern for IT’s value proposition “demonstrates that IT leaders not only consider themselves technology leaders, but also recognize the significant role they play in the achievement of organization goals,” according to the study.

Carestream’s Vue Clinical Collaboration Platform (CCP) is a great example of a technology solution with a strong health IT Value Proposition, equipping those responsible for providing, receiving and reimbursing care with the ability to share and manage clinical data in ways that can help reduce costs and improve care.  Additionally, CCP manages images with a standards-based modular platform, which means an organization can implement the programs it needs in the short term, and add additional modules at a later time as needed.

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White Paper: Functional Requirements for Enterprise Clinical Data Management

Defined requirements lay the path for future growth and change2016-03-18 13_31_20-Functional_Requirements_Enterprise Data Management.pdf - Adobe Reader

As healthcare organizations plan for the future growth and integration of clinical data into their IT ecosystems, it’s crucial to start with clearly defining the functional requirements that span the needs of users across the enterprise. Why? Because well-defined functional requirements specify exactly what IT systems need to accomplish in each department and across the healthcare organization, and delineate the metrics for success. Also, functional requirements help frame the core questions posed in Requests for Proposals (RFPs) or tenders and define for vendors the capabilities that must be provided to advance interoperability and accessibility. Lastly, if your organization wants to plan for growth and change, functional requirements define the standards that must be met to ensure future compatibility and minimize disruption.

This white paper provides an overview of the key functional requirements that must be built around four distinct modules:

  • Data capture and ingestion
  • Clinical management
  • Enterprise repository/archive
  • Collaboration

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Libro Blanco : Estrategias de Empresa de Imagenologia para Fusiones y Adquisiciones

Enterprise Imaging Strategies for M&AsTres estrategias para minimizar la interrupción de servicio después de una fusión

Como consultor de las TI en el Cuidado de la Salud, tengo la oportunidad de reunirme con altos ejecutivos en hospitales a lo largo del país. Debido a la tendencia de adquisiciones por la fuerte afiliación al cuidado de la salud hoy en día, no me sorprende que este sea un tema principal para altos ejecutivos y líderes de los departamentos que se verán afectados. Una preocupación particular es asegurarse de que los servicios de imagenologia no se vean interrumpidos durante o después de la adquisición. Esto requiere que la protección y accesibilidad a través de ajustes de cuidados. Para poder hacer frente a este desafío se requiere una estrategia de imagenologia robusta a lo largo de la empresa posterior a la fusión. Recientemente, El Instituto para la Transformación de Tecnología para la Salud (iHT2) llevo a cabo un proyecto de investigación, del cual fui participe. De esta investigación resultaron un detallado libro blanco y un seminario que exploró tres estrategias clave de integración:

  • Estrategia Centrada en el Departamento de PACS
  • Estrategia Centrada en la Empresa de Almacenaje
  • Estrategia a lo Largo de la Empresa

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Study: Dual-Energy Imaging and Digital Tomosynthesis

Innovative X-ray-based imaging technologies for rapid and accurate diagnosis of thoracic disease in critically ill patients

My most recent research at Toronto General Hospital explored the value of dual-energy (DE) imaging and digital tomosynthesis (DT) as solutions to the limitations of conventional radiographic thoracic imaging (chest radiography). Both DE and DT have been around for a few decades, but  recent advancements in digital detectors have made this technology increasingly promising in clinical use.

To this end, I conducted a study in collaboration with Ali Ursani, BEng, Fatima Ursani and Narinder Paul, MD, from Toronto General Hospital. Dr. Paul, who is the Site Chief, Toronto General Hospital – Joint Department of Medical Imaging, was the principal investigator in the study. In addition, four imaging experts from Carestream Health – Samuel Richard, PhD, Xiaohui Wang, PhD, Nathan Packard, PhD, and Levon Vogelsang PhD – were key participants. Additional support for patient recruitment consisted of the research coordinator and the team of technologists trained on the system with DE and DT functionalities.

Among the study’s many objectives were these:

  • Understand the gap between the performance of state-of-the-art chest radiograph (CXR) and computed tomography and the current needs of imaging facilities and patients.
  • Explore the concepts of dual-energy  imaging and digital tomosynthesis  as viable solutions to address these needs.
  • Examine the potential benefits that might be offered by a combined DE and DT system.Carestream DE and DT imaging

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