Diagnostic Reading #12: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Dose reduction and new ultrasound application make headlines

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: new technique uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs; monitoring software that can reduce dose for pediatric patients; a “digital pathologist” can improve cancer detection; variation in imaging utilization impacts practicing radiologists; and a decade of improvements in CT innovation are not reaching patients in some European countries.

Fluid in the lungs being measured by a new technique using ultrasound – Health Imaging

Medical researchers and engineers from North Carolina State University have found a new approach that uses ultrasound to measure fluid levels in the lungs. The noninvasive approach can track progress in treating pulmonary edema, which is common in patients with congestive heart failure.lung filled with fluid Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #10: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: the chatbot will answer you now; and IR can improve clinical outcomes

This week’s articles include: study shows more follow-up ultrasound exams performed when non-radiologists provide initial interpretation; interventional radiology can help improve clinical outcomes and recovery times; ACA replacement bill contains provisions beneficial to radiologists; AI chatbot can answer interventional radiology questions; and trial takes a different approach to classifying cancer treatment.

More follow-up ultrasounds performed when non-radiologists interpret – Diagnostic Imaging

Follow-up imaging after an initial ED ultrasound is significantly reduced when the ultrasound examination is interpreted by a radiologist rather than a non-radiologist, according to a study published in the JACR. Results showed that of 200,357 ED ultrasound events, 163,569 (81.6%) were interpreted by radiologists and 36,788 (18.4%) by non-radiologists. Across all study years, ED patients undergoing ultrasound examinations interpreted by non-radiologists underwent additional diagnostic imaging studies compared with patients whose examinations had been interpreted by a radiologist.

Interventional radiology can improve clinical outcomes and recovery times – American College of Radiology

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) have created downloadable resources to help local interventional radiologists educate hospital executives and radiology group officers about the clinical and economic benefits of starting a full-fledged, in-house IR practice. Clinical IR can help improve clinical outcomes, recovery times and patient satisfaction – key factors in new delivery and payment model reimbursement. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #9: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Topics presented at ECR2017 and HIMSS2017 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: how radiology departments can help ensure patient safety; why more radiologists are suffering from burnout and dissatisfaction; patients expect their physicians to be able to easily share their medical data with other providers; a progress report on data mobility and analytics; and why big data must be used in the fight against cancer.

How can radiology departments help ensure patient safety? – AuntMinnieEuropePatient safety

A presentation at ECR 2017 described potential risks from radiology procedures that include a missed abnormality due to technical issues as well as perception and communication errors.  Other errors include the wrong procedure being performed, studies performed on the wrong patient, or on the wrong side of the patient. Radiation exposure has risks including the potential for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. The presenter urged everyone working in radiology areas to act responsibility to ensure optimal patient treatment and outcomes. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

News update: health IT boosts economy; radiologists get high ratings from patients

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data; radiology’s role as a value center; HIMSS survey shows health IT is boosting the U.S. economy; a report from the first HIMSS Cybersecurity Forum describes different types of attacks being launched on healthcare facilities; and patients gave high ratings to U.S. radiologists in study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Overcoming hurdles to sharing patient data – Radiology Today

Recent advances in imaging technology deliver benefits for radiologists as well as healthcare providers and their patients. Enhanced interoperability has enabled off-site nighthawk radiology coverage.images of 24 7 clock

Also, large radiology practices can now serve rural as well as metropolitan areas—delivering access to subspecialists in all markets. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Top news: multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; and public clouds not secure

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: NIH study shows multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; cloud survey finds patient data might not be protected; what providers can learn from the hospitality industry; radiology as a business is becoming increasingly complex; and patient engagement reduces readmission from chronic conditions.

Multimedia radiology reports enhance tumor tracking – Auntminnie

Multimedia radiology reports that provide hyperlinks to annotated tumor measurements and include graphs that show treatment response can improve how these lesions are tracked over time, according to recently published research. In a retrospective study involving nearly 500 lesions, a team from NIH found that multimedia reports significantly improved concordance between Tumor Cellsradiologists and oncologists in selecting and measuring target lesions, compared with text-only radiology reports. The result is fewer discrepancies between what radiologists are measuring and what oncologists are using to evaluate how tumors are responding to therapy.

Cloud survey: quarter of healthcare organizations put patient data at risk in public cloud – Health Management Technology

A recent cloud survey analyzes healthcare organizations’ use of public cloud, the utilization of public cloud implementations, and how data is protected in these cloud environments. The survey of 51 healthcare and biotech organizations found that 25% of healthcare organizations using the public cloud do not encrypt their data. The survey also found that 63% of healthcare organizations say they intend to use multiple cloud vendors, and 38% of organizations with data in a multi-cloud environment are not using any form of encryption. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #7: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Machine learning in radiology and Federal Health Pavilion at HIMSS17 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: the HIMSS17 federal health IT solutions pavilion; first hospital in Canada to embrace medical 3D printing for surgical planningFederal Health IT Solutions Pavilion exhibit; machine learning in radiology targets efficiency; the barriers to interoperability; and radiology learns lessons from the Ebola crisis.

HIMSS17 Federal Health IT Solutions Pavilion to put population health, interoperability, and value-based care on display – Healthcare IT News

ONC, HRSA, the Defense Health Agency, and other government entities will be featured in the special Federal Health IT Solutions Pavilion exhibit on the show floor (Booth 230, Hall A). Attendees can find 22 educational sessions and other resources focusing on government initiatives to advance healthcare. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #6: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

This week’s articles include: EHRs and HIEs lacking, and post-processing in radiology

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: radiology in the era of payment reform; making the most of EHRs is easier said than done; exposing reasons for the difficulties in connecting patient information; brain MRI might help diagnose vascular cognitive disorder; and post-processing can fix problems with contrast uptake without re-imagingBusinessman Giving Money To Doctor patients.

Radiology in the era of payment reform – Diagnostic Imaging

The MACRA Act of 2015 is a quality payment program. Starting this year, there are two tracks for practices that bill Medicare patients: the advanced payment model and the merit-based incentive program. The statute recognizes two categories, patient facing and non-patient facing physicians. Many radiologists believe they are a patient-centered specialty; however there are advantages to the statute that classifies radiologists as non-patient facing. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #4: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Algorithms, on-the-job-training, and confidence are topics in radiology this week

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: radiologists face pressure to consolidate; an algorithm can extract and characterize findings in radiology reports; a year of clinical practice dramatically improves competency among radiologists; The Journal of the ACR outlines reasons why radiologists should not hedge when there is certainty; and a new health management service charges $149 a month to tend to patients’ primary care needs.image of pigs being squeezed

Squeeze play: Radiologists face pressure to consolidate – Radiology Business

Radiology has consolidated at a slower pace than other specialties, but rapid advances in technology and a pressure to reduce costs have made joining a large physician practice group an attractive option for some radiologists. Additionally, as hospitals face higher standards for value-based reimbursement, they expect more from radiologist practice groups. Services such as subspecialty or 24/7 reads might be difficult for small groups to offer. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #3: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Forbes healthcare predictions for 2017; rads less susceptible to vendor perksglass ball with the word future on it

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: Forbes healthcare predictions for 2017; can EHRs offer personalized care; why radiology is less susceptible to enticements from healthcare vendors;  exercise might help men (but not women) stave off Alzheimer’s disease; and out with Obamacare and in with Trumpcare.

Seeing the future? 9 predictions in healthcare technology – Clinical Innovation+Technology (Forbes)

With the New Year comes a new load of predictions, from football to politics to medicine. A Forbes article by Reenita Das takes a look at healthcare technology. Whether it’s connecting patients to physicians, reconstructing the foundation of healthcare or the introduction of robots, Das believes this year will see the pros outweighing the cons. In her article, she discusses topics such as artificial intelligence, Apple’s operations in healthcare, and behavioral health. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #2: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: ‘radiologist’ a top career; healthcare created most jobs in 2016

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: ‘radiologist” landed at No. 45 on CNN’s list of the top 100 careers; many YouTube videos designed to educate patients don’t address important quality and safety concerns; radiology journals have limited articles on patient-centered care; tort reform might reduce defensive imaging; and healthcare created more jobs than any other industry in 2016.image of radiograph

CNN: ‘Radiologist’ among best jobs in U.S. – Auntminnie

What’s so great about being a radiologist? The career scored “A” grades in three of the four categories CNN used to rate careers: personal satisfaction, benefit to society, and telecommuting. It scored a “B” grade under the “low stress” category. Those factors earned “radiologist” the No. 45 spot on CNN’s list of the top 100 careers in the country.

How well is radiology using YouTube to educate patients? – Auntminnie

Imaging facilities have found YouTube to be a useful social media platform for educating patients about radiology procedures they are about to undergo. A new study published in the JACR reports all of the videos the team studied showed a patient undergoing the exam. Researchers reported the videos did a reasonably good job presenting content related to the patient experience but did not address important topics such as quality and safety concerns. Continue reading