Diagnostic Reading #38: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Radiologist ethics training, equipment finance, and NHS Digital Academy are in the news

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles include: the recently launched NHS Digital Academy might be a key step in establishing informatics as a profession; radiologists and medical ethics training; a Canadian task force recommends AAA ultrasound screenings for men; equipment financing might help providers invest in new technology; and radiology residents improve skills after studying art.

NHS Digital Academy officially launched  – Digital Health

The recently launched National Health Service (NHS) Digital Academy is designed to create a change in the way the NHS develops digital leaders. It is also described as marking a key step in establishing informatics as a profession. NHS is the public health service of England, Scotland and Wales. Starting in 2018, the NHS Digital Academy aims to train 300 digital leaders over three years. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #37: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

A focus on IDoR2017 and capital budget planning are in the news

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles include: emergency radiology is the focus of the upcoming International Day of Radiology; the future of radiology and artificial intelligence; a recent study of NSCLC patients with radiotherapy treatment; advice for department chairs with capital budgets; and a new scientific model for tailoring pediatric CT dosage.

International Day of Radiology  – www.ACR.org

The sixth annual International Day of Radiology (IDoR) on November 8, 2017— jointly sponsored by the American College of Radiology, the Radiological Society of North America and the European Society of Radiology—will have international activities to mark the event, with more than 100 medical societies in 57 countries. This year, IDoR will focus on emergency radiology and the essential role that radiologists play in the emergency room, increasing the quality of care and treatment of patients. November 8, 2017, marks the 122nd anniversary of the 1895 discovery of the X-ray by German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #36: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: outside forces shape HIEs and outpatient imaging centers

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles include: cinematic rendering of medical images creates lifelike images; the benefits of teaching radiology to undergraduate students; HIEs and their growing importance; children receive more CT radiation at nonpediatric hospitals; and the state of outpatient imaging and its effect on both large and smaller providers.

AJR papers shine spotlight on cinematic rendering  – AuntMinnie.com

Cinematic rendering of medical images—also called “3D on steroids”—creates strikingly lifelike images from scans. Although many in radiology aren’t sure how it works, two recent papers in the American Journal of Roentgenology offer an explanation of this new technique. These two separate research groups describe their experiences with cinematic rendering and see its promising future as an improvement over both 2D images and 3D volume rendering. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #35: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: experts pitch cloud for cyber security; patient receives 3D printed skull bone

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

This week’s articles in Diagnostic Reading include: machine learning and how it helps radiologists; the rise of digital breast tomosynthesis; the benefits of cloud computing in cyber security; radiology trends in 2017; and successful surgery involving a 3D skull implant.

AI will augment rather than replace radiologists: How and why – Health Imaging

Despite projections of radiology’s demise due to algorithms, a recent article suggests that not only will machine learning not take radiologists’ jobs, it will become a routine component of their clinical practice—making their work more efficient, accurate, satisfying, and valued. The authors of the article, published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, state that most algorithms now being developed or refined provide computer-assisted diagnosis and detection (CADD) of discrete radiologic findings. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #34: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Articles include ways to increase patient satisfaction; and proper positioning can reduce radiologists’ injuries

This week’s articles in our Diagnostic Reading summary include: radiologists’ views of the imaging IT market today and where it’s headed; results of a recent study exploring CT exams and meningioma; how hospital administrators can increase patient satisfaction; advice on how to reduce work-related injuries for radiographers; and how to engage employees in cybersecurity training so they will practice what they learn.

Is enterprise imaging on a slow road to mediocrity?  – AuntMinnie.com

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

Diagnostic Reading keeps you up to date on current news

The imaging IT market is in a state of uncertainty and change as it slowly travels the path toward enterprise imaging. Previously clear definitions for PACS and RIS have blurred, and healthcare providers have struggled to keep up. However, recent research on the imaging IT and archiving and management IT software market gives a look at where we’re headed. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #33: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Making headlines: patient portals and radiologists have a role in patient centered care

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

Diagnostic Reading summarizes the week’s top news in health IT and radiology.

This week’s articles include: the importance of patient engagement and successful use of online tools; predicting no shows in radiology; radiologists and their part in effective physician-patient communication; what it takes to succeed in cybersecurity; and radiologists’ important role in a new Alzheimer’s treatment study.

What functionalities should patient portal tools have to succeed?  – HIT Consultant.net

Although most hospitals experience dismal usage of patient portals—due to lack of both EHR interoperability and patient-desired features—the growth of other engagement solutions such as remote patient monitoring has transformed healthcare for many people. Patient engagement, once considered a lower priority in healthcare IT, is increasing in importance. Consequently, our population’s comfort with online tools will likely increase patient portal usage more once robust features/functionalities, easy usability, and effective promotion become the norm. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #32: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news this week: articles for radiologists new to the profession as well as seasoned HIT professionals

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

This week’s articles include: radiation is not the only risk for pediatric patients; AI learns to predict schizophrenia from MRI brain scan; role of healthcare data governance in big data analytics; tips on how to select the right EHR replacement vendor and system; and Radiology Nation provides tools for radiologists in training.

Radiation not the only risk to consider when imaging pediatric patients – Radiology Business

When managing the care of pediatric patients, both referring physicians and radiologists know it’s important to consider the risks associated with radiation exposure. But according to a recent article in JACR, focusing too much on those risks and not considering other key factors can end up potentially harming the patient.

AI ‘learns’ to predict schizophrenia from brain MRI – Radiology Business

A collaborative effort between IBM and the University of Alberta in Canada has produced artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms that are able to examine MRI exams and predict schizophrenia with 74 percent accuracy. The retrospective analysis also showed the technology was able to determine the severity of symptoms by examining activity in various regions of the brain. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #31: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Medical record storage, over-recommended mammograms, and point-of-care ultrasound are in the news

Picture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

This week’s articles include: Kaiser EDs implement head CT trauma rules that reduce utilization; how long should healthcare providers save medical images; U.S. physicians over-recommend mammography; more point-of-care ultrasound is needed in ambulances and in ED; and the ACR launches a project that brings the brightest imaging informatics minds together with industry stakeholders and patient advocates to discuss who can use and own patient data, what methods of communication are best, and how AI can be used.

Community EDs cut needless trauma CT using Canadian rule – Health Imaging

After implementing an established rule for selecting head CT for trauma patients, 13 Kaiser Permanente community EDs in Southern California reduced avoidable head CT utilization by 5.3 percent while improving their performance on injury identification, according to a study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #30: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

AI’s influence on patient outcomes and phone interruptions to radiologists are in the news

Picture of radiographer dictating while reading a radiograph

This week’s articles include: dangers of phone interruptions for reading radiologists; use of AI can help physicians predict and improve patient outcomes; new heart imaging method might predict heart attacks; PET can accurately detect or exclude Alzheimer’s; and HIMSS Europe joins with Health 2.0 to coordinate 2018 digital health conference in Europe.

Phone interruptions can increase discrepancies – AuntminnieEurope

Both radiologists and referrers are far too quick to accept telephone interruptions. Telephone calls are one of the most frequent interruptions to reporting, and a call during the hour before completing a report may increase the chance of discrepancies by 12 percent. A study found that interruptions occur alarmingly often. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #29: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

New this week: the human role in AI and cybersecurity; sonographers’ role in the UKPicture of patient holding a wireless detector on his knee

This week’s articles include: artificial intelligence and the future of medicine; cybersecurity training strategies for employees; information technology tools assist daily radiology workflows; the increasing role of sonographers in the UK; and radiology residents lack training in patient communication.

Our health data—the most important medical discovery of our time – HIE Answers

Although the future of medicine includes artificial intelligence (AI), none of it will be possible unless we properly manage our medical data. Our own medical studies, pathology results, CAT scans, and lab values enable this medical revolution. This transformation in how we think about healthcare data poses many technical and ethical challenges. To enable breakthroughs, we must appropriately store, curate, and share immutable data.  Continue reading