Streamlining Clinical Workflows in Vascular Ultrasound

Automation increases efficiency and reduces stress on sonographers

Sometimes less is better than more. It’s certainly true for clinical workflows in vascular ultrasound.

For example, with Pulse Wave (PW /Spectral) Doppler imaging, it typically takes five steps to capture velocity profile and ten to capture volume profile. But CARESTREAM’s Smart Flow Assist technology reduces the steps to only two by eliminating the need for repeated manual adjustments.diagram showing reduced steps

Spectral Doppler imaging is commonly performed to quantify flow profiles in blood vessels. The measurement is displayed as a waveform trace, depicting the velocity distribution (profile) at the given spatial location as a function of time. Capturing the velocity profile requires five steps:

  1. Turn on Color Flow mode to obtain the orientation of the vessel
  2. Turn on PW Doppler mode
  3. Update the beam steering direction
  4. Move the gate to obtain the highest velocity, and
  5. Angle-correct the gate

Each step requires manual effort by the sonographer. Moreover, the typical clinical workflow in vascular ultrasound requires repeated manual adjustments each time the transducer is moved. Steps 3 to 5 must be repeated with each movement of the transducer.   Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #16: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Patient portals and outpatient imaging centers are in the newsRadiologist reading image

This week’s articles include: radiologists can play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis; education of  older patients is key to adoption of patient portals; including informal caregivers in discharge planning can cut readmissions by 25%; outpatient imaging centers are on the rise; and 83% of executives plan to invest in telehealth.

Cardiac findings in stroke: What radiologists need to know – AuntMinnie Europe

Advances in CT and MRI make it feasible to identify subtle cardiac pathologies responsible for strokes that used to remain unnoticed. This puts greater emphasis on the know-how of imaging professionals, according to Spanish researchers who received a prestigious magna cum laude award at ECR 2017. “Radiologists play a pivotal role in stroke diagnosis and management,” noted Dr. Flavio Zuccarino and colleagues from the thoracic radiology section in the department of radiology at Hospital del Mar in Barcelona, Spain. Continue reading

A Guide to Mobile Chest X-rays for Thoracic and Cardiac Care

Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital Shares their “O to U Approach” for capturing high quality diagnostic AP images

Mobile chest X-rays performed in the antero-posterior (AP) projection has always been considered an inferior examination to the more standard posterior-aneterior (PA) projection. However, for critically ill patients, at times an AP image is the only option.

By applying a structured technique – our O to U Approach – and with the aid of our four CARESTREAM DRX-Revolution mobile X-ray machines, we are able to achieve an optimum mobile chest image. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #15: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Rad salaries and assessments, and population health made headlines

This week’s articles include: radiologists rank 6th on salary survey; assessment tool gauges radiology resident competency; clinicians learn more from structured reports; discussion about whether IT managers or doctors should lead population health programs; and seven top growth models and their impact on physician-hospital partnerships.radiologist reading image

Radiologists rank 6th on Medscape salary survey – Auntminnie

Radiologists ranked sixth on a survey of physician salaries produced by Medscape, with an average annual compensation of $396,000. Orthopedic physicians stood at the top of the list as the highest paid with an annual average salary of $489,000. They were followed by plastic surgeons, urologists, and otolaryngologists. Radiology salaries grew about 5% last year. Only 62% of radiologists felt they were fairly compensated. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: April Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

Hello April! We are welcoming April with open arms and a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge!”

We welcome radiologists, technologists, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

No one correctly guessed the March image challenge!  The correct answer was — a portable reading light!

Happy guessing and good luck!

 

Understanding the Impact of Cone Beam Imaging on Orthopaedic Practices

Modality enables capture of low-dose 3D extremity exams on site

Orthopaedic specialists can streamline workflow and productivity by capturing onsite exams with new 3D cone beam technology. The capability to do image capture, diagnosis, and discussion of treatment options with patients in a single visit is getting the attention of orthopaedic and sports medicine practices.

Here are some helpful studies and articles to help you understand the benefits and implications of on site 3D imaging.

Clinical studies: Researchers from theJacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo have been performing institutional IRB-approved clinical trials and basic sciences studies with CARESTREAM’s OnSight 3D Extremity System. Based on early data, they are convinced that many imaging studies should be acquired with subjects in positions that represent true human function, such as weight bearing on the lower extremities. And they found that Carestream’s system produced 2D images with equivalent diagnostic image quality to the predicate system for a range of exams. Also, 3D images were rated equal or better when compared to the predicate device for a range of exams on cadaveric specimens and human subjects.

Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #14: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

In the news: imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; and rads might need to update their CVs

This week’s articles include: HHS is on track to transfer 41% of its data to the cloud; imaging providers need to improve services for disabled adults; Italians report 30% drop in breast cancer due to screening; MRI might help determine treatment for patients with depression; and radiologists might want to update their CVs.

HHS goes from reluctant to eager cloud adopter – Health Management Technology

In 2015 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reported just 1% of all systems in the cloud. If all goes as planned, the agency will have almost 41% of all investments moving “in some way” to the cloud. One of the key turning points came when IT staff and mission owners tested tools and software. Moving the HHS financial management system to a shared service provider’s cloud also helped.

image of a cloud

cloud computing

Imaging providers need to do a better job of reaching disabled adults – Radiology Business

Adults with disabilities undergo colon cancer screening at a lower rate when compared to the general population. Studies have found adults with disabilities utilize less preventative care in general, but colorectal cancer screening is especially troublesome. It’s an easily treatable disease with an intensive exam—which can create additional barriers to care. The recent uptick in colon cancer in young Americans underscores the need for widespread screening. Continue reading

Healthcare Cloud Solutions: Evaluating 4 Key Components of Data Security

A technical brief for assessing cloud solution providers

The use of healthcare cloud solutions is on the rise. Research firm MarketsandMarkets predicts that healthcare spending on cloud services will reach $9.48 billion by 2020, a big leap from $3.73 billion in 2015.

Several drivers are fueling the surge including addressing medical staffing shortages. Other drivers are cost efficiency, patient facing tools, access to information, telemedicine, and necessary computing power for big data analysis, according to CloudTech. Also, new modalities for diagnostic imaging bring with them increased storage requirements, making the cloud an essential part of an enterprise imaging strategy, according to Winthrop-University Hospital in NY.image of lock on a cloud Continue reading