Section 179: Radiology Equipment Tax Deduction for 2016

Section 179 offers radiology equipment tax savings for some small businesses

New radiology equipment and medical printing solutions have the potential to improve an imaging center’s bottom line through increased patient throughput. But did you know that there is also a possible radiology equipment tax deduction through Section 179 for small businesses?Magnifying glass higlighting the word tax

Under tax legislation passed by the federal government to help small businesses purchase capital equipment and spur economic growth, you might be able to write off (i.e. deduct) the entire amount of a purchase at one time (subject to certain limitations), rather than its depreciated value over time.

Under current tax law, this year’s Section 179 deduction allows business owners to write off up to $500,000 on overall property. However this amount is limited if total purchases exceed $2,000,000 during the year.

Additional details can be found at https://www.irs.gov/publications/p946/ch02.html and http://www.section179.org.

To understand the potential radiology equipment tax deductions that might apply under Section 179, refer to the following table: Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #8: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Top news: multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; and public clouds not secure

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: NIH study shows multimedia reports enhance tumor tracking; cloud survey finds patient data might not be protected; what providers can learn from the hospitality industry; radiology as a business is becoming increasingly complex; and patient engagement reduces readmission from chronic conditions.

Multimedia radiology reports enhance tumor tracking – Auntminnie

Multimedia radiology reports that provide hyperlinks to annotated tumor measurements and include graphs that show treatment response can improve how these lesions are tracked over time, according to recently published research. In a retrospective study involving nearly 500 lesions, a team from NIH found that multimedia reports significantly improved concordance between Tumor Cellsradiologists and oncologists in selecting and measuring target lesions, compared with text-only radiology reports. The result is fewer discrepancies between what radiologists are measuring and what oncologists are using to evaluate how tumors are responding to therapy.

Cloud survey: quarter of healthcare organizations put patient data at risk in public cloud – Health Management Technology

A recent cloud survey analyzes healthcare organizations’ use of public cloud, the utilization of public cloud implementations, and how data is protected in these cloud environments. The survey of 51 healthcare and biotech organizations found that 25% of healthcare organizations using the public cloud do not encrypt their data. The survey also found that 63% of healthcare organizations say they intend to use multiple cloud vendors, and 38% of organizations with data in a multi-cloud environment are not using any form of encryption. Continue reading

White Paper: What to Look for in an Enterprise Image Viewer

Enterprise image viewers aren’t all equal; get the guide

An enterprise image viewer is your organization’s connection among stakeholders, linking radiologists with referring physicians, patients with doctors, and clinicians at home with specialists across the country.

It’s understood that the most crucial aspect of every radiology diagnostic report is the image. Yet referring physicians and other clinicians typically see only words—the written reports and conclusions dictated by radiologists.doctor looking at images on tablet

An enterprise image viewer – also known as an universal image viewer – bridges the gap, displaying images of many types—not just DICOM—and other clinical data such as JPEG photos, videos, ECGs, and scanned PDF clinical documents.  A new white paper, “Enterprise Access Viewer”, explores and explains the requirements for an effective universal image viewer.

Enterprise image viewer – easy access helps minimize cost and dose Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #7: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

Machine learning in radiology and Federal Health Pavilion at HIMSS17 are in the news

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: the HIMSS17 federal health IT solutions pavilion; first hospital in Canada to embrace medical 3D printing for surgical planningFederal Health IT Solutions Pavilion exhibit; machine learning in radiology targets efficiency; the barriers to interoperability; and radiology learns lessons from the Ebola crisis.

HIMSS17 Federal Health IT Solutions Pavilion to put population health, interoperability, and value-based care on display – Healthcare IT News

ONC, HRSA, the Defense Health Agency, and other government entities will be featured in the special Federal Health IT Solutions Pavilion exhibit on the show floor (Booth 230, Hall A). Attendees can find 22 educational sessions and other resources focusing on government initiatives to advance healthcare. Continue reading

Radiology Room Requirements for Medical Imaging

Balancing patient populations with changes in procedures and equipment

Radiology room requirements are a paradox. Imaging rooms require solid construction to support 1,000 pound overhead tube cranes as well as lead linings to contain x-ray scatter. Yet they must be somewhat fluid to accommodate advances in imaging technology and new procedures that have a host of associated equipment.

Winthrop University Hospital is a 591-bed university-affiliated medical center that offers sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic care in virtually every specialty and subspecialty of medicine andRadiology room requirements surgery. Located in Mineola, NY, we offer a full complement of inpatient and outpatient services.

To meet our population’s imaging needs, we have two fluoroscopy rooms, a general imaging room, and two imaging rooms for our emergency department. In addition, we have a CT, MRI, and ultrasound system. Continue reading

Diagnostic Reading #6: Five “Must Read” Articles on HIT and Radiology

This week’s articles include: EHRs and HIEs lacking, and post-processing in radiology

Diagnostic Reading summary includes: radiology in the era of payment reform; making the most of EHRs is easier said than done; exposing reasons for the difficulties in connecting patient information; brain MRI might help diagnose vascular cognitive disorder; and post-processing can fix problems with contrast uptake without re-imagingBusinessman Giving Money To Doctor patients.

Radiology in the era of payment reform – Diagnostic Imaging

The MACRA Act of 2015 is a quality payment program. Starting this year, there are two tracks for practices that bill Medicare patients: the advanced payment model and the merit-based incentive program. The statute recognizes two categories, patient facing and non-patient facing physicians. Many radiologists believe they are a patient-centered specialty; however there are advantages to the statute that classifies radiologists as non-patient facing. Continue reading

Cloud Strategy: An Enterprise Imaging White Paper from Carestream and HIMSS

What is your cloud strategy for medical imaging? Two large hospitals see it differently

Cloud strategies for storing and accessing medical images across the enterprise are front and center in healthcare IT these days. The increasing sophistication of imaging technology has resulted in substantial increases in imaging data.

The upside of this evolution is that clinicians have more imaging information available to aid in diagnosis and treatment. The downside is that the vast increase in imaging data is putting pressure on provider data centers everywhere.

As storage requirements increase with every new modality, the cloud is no longer an optional part of your enterprise imaging strategy. It is rapidly becoming an essential component. Our new cloud strategies white paper shares the experiences of two different imaging providers with a cloud strategy. Continue reading

Guess the X-ray: February Image Challenge

Can you guess the image in the X-ray?

It’s February, and with a new month comes a new “Guess the X-ray Image Challenge”. Here’s a hint: there are 2 items in the image and you likely have them on or near your desk!

We welcome radiologists, technicians, RAs, MDs, PAs – or anyone who thinks they’re up to the challenge – to guess the subject in this X-ray. Please leave your answer in the comment section below or on our Facebook page. The challenge will stop at the end of the month.

Congratulations to those who correctly guessed the January image challenge!  The correct answer was — tea bag and a wine bottle cork!

Happy guessing and good luck!