Preparing for the next-generation of medical imaging data and analytics

Today, the cloud is a grownup with a seat at the IT table. The major issues around the cloud (security, access and speed) have been satisfactorily resolved by industries outside of healthcare: technology, software, financial services, Cloud_imageand retail have been using the cloud for years.

Of course, healthcare does have its own unique issues of privacy, security and access that make it slow to adopt any new technology, and the cloud has been no exception. But progress has been made. In a recent annual study of 125 large and small cloud users, for the first time in 2016, security was not the first concern mentioned. Technology has jumped ahead to meet the challenges of healthcare’s journey to value.

The cloud is an essential part of the healthcare industry’s IT structure/restructure to reduce costs, increase clinical collaboration and speed up clinicians’ access to information. As larger study files boost storage requirements, Intel and Carestream have partnered in Intel’s Storage Builder Program. The purpose of the collaboration is to blend Carestream’s expertise in healthcare information systems with Intel’s technological prowess to increase the performance of Carestream’s PACS and RIS systems and to make them more useful to clinicians.  For example, Carestream recently deployed the new Intel® Solid-State Drive (SSD) Data Center (DC) Family for PCle® P3700 featuring Non-Volatile Memory Express™ (NVMe™) and observed a threefold increase in throughput in that portion of the Carestream Vue workflow.

Radiology journalist says new developments will support goals of improved accuracy and reduced risks

Miguel Ángel de la Cámara is one of the most active Spanish journalists in the field of radiology. With a goal of constantly increasing knowledge in radiology between professionals and patients, he combines his daily work as a radiology technician at Talarrubias Hospital (Extremadura Health Service) with his curiosity as a multi-skilled Illustration-of-mobile-phone-and-radiographyreporter. His work has distinguished him as one of the top influencers in healthcare in Spain . Everything Rad asked his opinion about the 33rd Congress of the Spanish Radiology Society held in Bilbao and the future of radiology.

What would you highlight at the Bilbao Congress from the viewpoint of professional radiology?

I think some important developments are emerging, such as the collaborative construction of knowledge. In radiology, everything is connected. Although radiology reports are the main value, we’re also creating value in many processes that were previously not so visible, such as the security culture or complex post-processing. I think we’re going far beyond radiology reports, although we’re forgetting, for example, about the enormous amount of radiology activity within primary care. Radiology is not only used in hospitals.

In the news: medical devices might pose HIT risk; increase in radiology jobs

Articles include: medical devices offer risks for authorized access; ACR projects 16% job growth for radiologists in 2016; Stanford’s radiology department uses patient input to improve processes; FDA issued updated requirements Image of Healthcare Network Access

regarding 510(k) submissions for medical devices and software changes; and RSNA teams with The Sequoia Project to support the electronic exchange of medical images and related diagnostic reports.

Medical devices offer new risks for network access – Health Data Management

Hospitals typically have hundreds of medical devices, which represent an easy gateway for hackers. Newer medical devices might be more robust in the types and amounts of data they collect, and they might connect not only to the core network but also through Wi-Fi networks. A security consulting firm recommends healthcare facilities use “network segmentation,” so that devices are linked to a separate network.

ACR projects 16% job growth for radiologists in 2016 – Auntminnie

The number of new jobs available for radiologists in 2016 will be 16% higher than those available in 2015, according to the fifth annual workforce survey by the Commission on Human Resources at the American College of Radiology (ACR). The study was published online August 3 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Reliability, redundancy and mobility help provider keep pace with imaging needs Many radiology departments are feeling the pressure of “doing more with less”. For Columbus Regional Health in Indiana, the pressure was literal: the medical provider had to eliminate three RAD rooms yet maintain the same

Advisory Board Company’s Imaging Performance Partnership research offers insights for imaging leaders

Recent years have seen transformational change occur in the American health care market. Keegrowth-strategies-for-imagingping up with each development is daunting, but equally challenging is identifying the implications of these changes on the future of health care delivery and payment. Below are three major takeaways for imaging leaders, courtesy of the Advisory
Board Company’s Imaging Performance Partnership research team. This outlook can serve as a guide for forging a successful radiology strategy in 2016 and beyond.

  1. Explore screening and interventional radiology programs as growth opportunities

Recent years have seen low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening and CT colonography (CTC) receive approval from the United States Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF) as essential health benefits. These decisions open the door for radiology providers to provide these potentially life-saving services to patients in an affordable way, while also demonstrating radiology’s value proposition as a gateway to the health system. Many providers also are exploring mobile mammography and partnerships with employers as a way of growing their programs. In order to ensure the success of these new initiatives, it is vital to deploy marketing strategies to referring physicians about the benefits and potential harms of these services.

Similarly, interventional radiology (IR) has had new life breathed into the specialty as pioneers advance the list of procedures outside of vascular services. Additionally, IR is attractive to both patients and health systems due to its noninvasive nature, its low cost compared to surgical approaches and the great outcomes results. Institutions with existing IR programs should align their growth with non-procedural specialties like oncology, pediatrics and primary care. Several programs have also seen success marketing IR directly to patients who are seeking an alternative to invasive surgeries.

Articles include: healthcare providers need multiple firewalls to protect patient data; radiologists need to establish a role on cancer treatment teams; a HIMSS/SIIM paper offers key features to consider when selecting an enterprise image viewer; 3D imaging helps diagnose 1.7-million-year-old cancer; and an Alzheimer’s vaccine could be available Image-illustrating-a-data-breachin five years.

Hack of Banner Health highlights the need for more firewalls – Health Data Management

A cyber attack at Banner Health that provided access to the information of 3.7 million individuals is a wake-up call to other provider organizations. Many hospitals only have a perimeter firewall used to provide protection for moving in and out of the core network. At Banner, the food and beverage system in the cafe that was used to ring up sales (often made with a credit or debit card) was attacked, and that opened the gate to the system’s network. This demonstrates the need for multiple firewalls across the organization.

Cuts in reimbursement and imaging, new Joint Commission standards and increasing patient expectations were top topics at AHRA2016.

A “sea change” in the environment of care, cuts in reimbursement and new standards from the Joint Commission were among the topics causing heartburn for radiology administrators at the AHRA2016 annual meeting.Image of person showing stress to AHRA updates

Sarah Hostetter of the Advisory Board Company opened her presentation by saying that “the changes in healthcare are enough to induce the need for an imaging stress test”. She then delivered an informative presentation on the “Key Forces Shaping Imaging Economics” that include volume, growth and regulatory outlooks for imaging, and the impacts of consumerism and value-based care.

Added stressors came in the form of updated standards from the Joint Commission that were presented by Judith Atkins, RN, MSN, McKenna Consulting. “For most providers, most of their reimbursement comes from Medicare. So Medicare has the power and they drove the Joint Commission to change its diagnostic standards,” Atkins said. “The new parameters will dramatically decrease imaging numbers.”

Patient portals and growth of the X-ray detector market are in the news

Articles include: the X-ray detector market is expected to reach $2.9 billion by 2021; experts call for a national medical device evaluation system in the U.S.; a court decision could potentially change the role radiologists play Image of an x-raywhen it comes to determining the medical necessity of a study ordered by a referring physician; patient portals offer access to imaging exam results quickly while also helping patients track their own care and communicate with their doctors; and the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Million Veteran Program now has the distinction of being the largest genomic database in the world.

X-ray detector market to reach $2.9B by 2021 – AuntMinnie

The global xray detector market will reach $2.9 billion by 2021, growing at a compound annual growth rate of 5.5%, according to a new report from MarketsandMarkets. The growth will be prompted by technological advances, an increasingly elderly population, government and venture capital funding, volume growth of orthopaedic and cardiovascular procedures and reimbursement cuts for analog systems, MarketsandMarkets said.

Image of Carestream’s Dan Monaghan

Dan Monaghan, Carestream Health, Introducing the AHRA Keynote Speaker

Before introducing the keynote speaker Monday at AHRA 2016, Carestream’s Dan Monaghan asked the radiology administrators in attendance three questions:

  1. Do you need more hours in the day?
  2. Do you wish you had more time and more energy?
  3. Could you use less stress and more fun in your life?

With hands raised and heads nodding, there was agreement that medical imaging directors are feeling the pressure of increased demands from hospital administrators, reimbursement changes and cost controls.

Speaker and author Christine Cashen took to the stage and used a mix of humor and relatable storytelling to compel AHRA attendees to change their perspectives and join her in the “Campaign to Stop Global Whining.”  Her message was simple: conflict is inevitable; different personalities require different approaches; only you can control your emotional state; and as a leader in your department, your positive energy will fuel your team’s success.

This shift in mindset can start with a few simple changes: